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Articles Tagged Hideki Matsui 

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04-26

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1

Transaction Analysis: Can't Spell Depth Without DH
by
R.J. Anderson

02-09

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8

On the Beat: The Best of the Rest of the Free Agent Market
by
John Perrotto

09-20

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13

The Asian Equation: The Future of the NPB Import Market
by
Michael Street

08-24

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57

The Lineup Card: 11 Disastrous Acquisitions
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-21

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0

Tater Trot Tracker: Trot Times for July 20
by
Larry Granillo

06-08

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5

The Asian Equation: The Futile Quest for the Next Ichiro
by
Michael Street

05-27

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9

Fantasy Beat: The DH Conundrum
by
Jason Collette

12-22

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24

Prospectus Perspective: Athletic Ambitions
by
Christina Kahrl

04-05

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0

Fantasy Beat: Hot Spots: First Base, Third Base, and Designated Hitter
by
Michael Street

11-05

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22

Prospectus Hit and Run: Anatomy of a Championship
by
Jay Jaffe

03-19

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14

Team Health Reports: New York Yankees
by
Brad Wochomurka

03-06

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Team Health Reports: New York Yankees
by
Will Carroll

02-20

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Prospectus Today: Putting the Right Pegs in the Right Holes
by
Joe Sheehan

04-10

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Impact Talent in Japan
by
Mike Plugh

03-01

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Clutch Performers, 2006
by
Dan Fox

11-11

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0

Prospectus Notebook: Orioles, Yankees
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-13

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Prospectus Game of the Week: Cleveland Indians @ New York Yankees, 7/10/05
by
Jonah Keri

03-01

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Prospectus Today: Post-Hype Syndrome
by
Joe Sheehan

07-14

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Mid-Season Baseball Awards
by
Ryan Wilkins

06-10

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Prospectus Triple Play: Florida Marlins, New York Yankees, Pittsburgh Pirates
by
Baseball Prospectus

03-23

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The View from Florida
by
David Cameron

10-28

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Internet Baseball Awards
by
Ryan Wilkins

07-15

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Mid-Season Baseball Awards
by
Greg Spira

03-25

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Surveying the Authors
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-31

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Prospectus Feature: Top 40 Prospects Roundtable
by
Baseball Prospectus

11-11

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The Week in Quotes: November 4-10
by
Ryan Wilkins

02-21

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0

Japanese Baseball, Pt. 2
by
Clay Davenport

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Joe Girardi is sifting through his lineup options, but that's the lesser of two major challenges he faces.

The Yankees appear to have come around to the only proper solution to their convoluted outfield/first base/DH situation: Jason Giambi at first, Hideki Matsui at DH, and Johnny Damon in left field. This is far and away the best of the available options, largely because the non-Giambi choices at first base resemble little more than the stuff available in the reserve rounds of the AL LABR draft.

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April 10, 2007 12:00 am

Impact Talent in Japan

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Mike Plugh

A review of who might come to the States as free agents, through the posting system, and names you just want to know.

Why the sudden interest in who's next? It wasn't all that many years ago that people scoffed at the idea of a Japanese player making an impact in the major leagues. There were a lot of reasons given for the lack of interest, but I believe the lack of high-profile Asian athletes on the American sports scene perpetuated some old ideas about the size, strength, and durability of East Asian players. Misconceptions remain until someone gives us a reason to change our minds.

In the year 2000 I was living and working in New York. That was when the name "Ichiro" began to make the rounds, as the Orix Blue Wave was getting ready to send the outfielder to the Mariners. Many people I spoke with at the time rolled their eyes at the move. The big money the M's were spending on a little slap hitter from Japan was widely questioned. I vividly recall my shock at the rationale behind these journalists' opinions. "Japanese players are too small, lack power, and won't stand up to the grueling Major League routine. Major Leaguers are much bigger, stronger, and likely to dominate the average Japanese position player. They don't throw as hard as we do. The parks are smaller. How can we expect to believe in the quality of Japanese baseball when minor league wash outs go over there and succeed?"

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Dan examines where research on clutch hitting is now, and ranks the best in 2006.

Clutch hitting is one of those issues that just won't go away. Ever since Dick Cramer's famous study titled "Do Clutch Hitters Exist?" was published in the 1977 Baseball Research Journal there has been no end to the discussion of just what is and what isn't clutch hitting, and how it can or can't be measured.

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The Orioles and Yankees have some crucial offseason decisions ahead of them.

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Jonah witnesses the Randy Johnson of old turning into the Randy Johnson who's just old.

Time and again during Sunday's tilt between the Indians and Yankees, Johnson got into trouble. The Indians started each of the first five innings with a runner on base. Johnson's fastball kept catching the middle of the plate, leading to several booming hits into the gaps. But just when the Tribe looked ready to blow the game open, they'd blow it by hacking at fastballs up and out of the zone, the only kind Johnson could throw by anyone. That impatience, along with Johnson's still-lethal slider, some Indians base-running blunders and some Yankee luck, combined to keep the Bombers in a game they should have lost early on. Here's what transpired:

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Finding the guys who broke hearts the year before is a good way to run over your fantasy league.

Two of the biggest reasons for their dance with contention were Travis Hafner and Victor Martinez, both of whom destroyed the ball in the first half before slipping slightly in the second. Both players were in their second full season in the majors, each having been something of a disappointment in their rookie campaigns. Hafner hit .254/.327/.485 for the Tribe in 2003, struggling to command the strike zone (22 walks, 81 strikeouts in 291 at-bats) after coming over from the Rangers in an offseason trade. Martinez, a Rookie of the Year candidate coming into '03, hit a very empty .289 (.345 OBP, .333 SLG) while spending part of the year at Buffalo and another part on the DL with a bum right ankle.

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Welcome all to the results of the Baseball Prospectus Mid-Season Awards. The points system is 10-7-5-3-1 for the MVP and Cy Young Awards, and 5-3-1 for the Rookie Awards. BP authors' picks, with all-too-clever comments, are included here, below the awards standings. Hitters: Ballots, Points (1st Place Votes), (Avg/OBP/SLG/RARP/VORP) Pitchers: Ballots, Points (1st Place Votes), (ERA, IP, SNWAR or ARP, VORP)

Welcome all to the results of the Baseball Prospectus Mid-Season Awards.

The points system is 10-7-5-3-1 for the MVP and Cy Young Awards, and 5-3-1 for the Rookie Awards. BP authors' picks, with all-too-clever comments, are included here, below the awards standings.

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The Marlins have spent the whole year exceeding expectations. Can they keep it up? Hideki Matsui has turned into a different type of hitter. And the Pirates' two best hitters share the same last name, but little else in terms of ability. All this and much more news from Florida, New York, and Pittsburgh in your Thursday edition of Prospectus Triple Play.

  • I'm So Glad I Spent It With You: Like Lou Reed in the song "Perfect Day," the Florida Marlins just keep hangin' on. Despite being picked by no more than one BP author--Steven Goldman, resident staff Jester and Orson Welles lookalike--to take the division in our Preseason Predictions Spectular™, the Fish continue to set the tone in the National League East, currently leading the second-place Phillies by two full games.
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    March 23, 2004 12:00 am

    The View from Florida

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    David Cameron

    Matsui's impressive career across the Pacific has people comparing him to Barry Larkin in his prime, and there is no doubt that he had a phenomenal season in 2002, and a pretty good one in 2003. According to Clay Davenport's translations Matsui posted a line equivalent to a .291 EqA in 2002, putting him near Derek Jeter offensively among shortstops, clearly among the best in the game. He slipped to .267 last year, approximately the same production Angel Berroa gave the Royals in his debut season. PECOTA pegs Matsui as a rebound candidate in 2004, projecting a weighted-mean EqA of .279 with a VORP of 39.0, again putting him in the upper tier of major league shortstops. However, a significantly large portion of his value is tied directly to his power, and the translation of power numbers from Japan to MLB may be the area we know the least about.

    The New York Mets became the most recent team to invest heavily in this market, giving Kazuo Matsui a three-year, $20 million contract to lure him to Queens. However, no one is really quite sure what to expect from the Mets' new shortstop, and even general manager Jim Duquette referred to the signing as a "calculated risk." That is not the usual propaganda being thrown about at press conferences, and serves to illustrate that some of the concern about the move from Japan to MLB still lingers, even in the minds of those with millions invested in a player's success.

    Matsui's impressive career across the Pacific has people comparing him to Barry Larkin in his prime, and there is no doubt that he had a phenomenal season in 2002, and a pretty good one in 2003. According to Clay Davenport's translations--Clay wrote an in-depth essay on translations ranging from Japan to the Mexican leagues in BP 2004--Matsui posted a line equivalent to a .291 EqA in 2002, putting him near Derek Jeter offensively among shortstops, clearly among the best in the game. He slipped to .267 last year, approximately the same production Angel Berroa gave the Royals in his debut season. PECOTA pegs Matsui as a rebound candidate in 2004, projecting a weighted-mean EqA of .279 with a VORP of 39.0, again putting him in the upper tier of major league shortstops. However, a significantly large portion of his value is tied directly to his power, and the translation of power numbers from Japan to MLB may be the area we know the least about.

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    October 28, 2003 12:00 am

    Internet Baseball Awards

    0

    Ryan Wilkins

    As many of our readers were submitting their ballots for the annual Internet Baseball Awards, 11 Baseball Prospectus authors went into the polling booths themselves, voicing their opinions on who should win the major baseball awards this year. Here are the results...

    As many of our readers were submitting their ballots for the annual Internet Baseball Awards, 11 Baseball Prospectus authors went into the polling booths themselves, voicing their opinions on who should win the major baseball awards this year. Here are the results:

    National League Player of the Year

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    The BP Staff weighs in with their mid-season ballots, showing who they think deserves an MVP, Cy Young Award, and Rookie of the Year.

    The points system is 10-7-5-3-1 for the MVP and Cy Young Awards, and 5-3-1 for the Rookie Awards. BP authors' picks, with occasional comments, are included below the awards standings.

    Hitters: Ballots, Points (1st Place Votes), (Avg/OBP/SLG/RARP/VORP)
    Pitchers: Ballots, Points (1st Place Votes), (ERA, IP, SNWAR or ARP, VORP)

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    Well, it's that time of year again--the time for Baseball Prospectus authors to emerge from out of their respective caves, and provide readers with further evidence that they know absolutely nothing about this game they call "base ball." In other words, it's time for the annual set of Preseason Predictions. For this survey, 13 members of the Baseball Prospectus staff submitted their predictions in time for publication, covering--among other things--divisional standings, postseason standings, and end-of-season awards. Later this week, a Roundtable discussion will run in this space, discussing the predictions seen below, and probably a bunch of other topics as well. Enjoy.

    For this survey, 13 members of the Baseball Prospectus staff submitted their predictions in time for publication, covering--among other things--divisional standings, postseason standings, and end-of-season awards. Later this week, a Roundtable discussion will run in this space, discussing the predictions seen below, and probably a bunch of other topics as well. Enjoy.

    National League

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