CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Articles Tagged Henry Rodriguez 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives
<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

November 8, 2012 5:00 am

Minor League Update: Games of November 7

1

Jason Martinez

Notes on prospects in the Arizona Fall League, Dominican Winter League, and Venezuelan Winter League.

It was great to see some baseball news back on my Twitter feed, even though the only significant roster-altering move on Wednesday (Padres catcher Yasmani Grandal suspended 50 games after testing positive for elevated testosterone) hurts the team that I've been cheering for since I was a kid. Rumors are always fun, though, and there were some interesting names, including Justin Upton), mentioned as potential trade candidates and a few teams (Mariners, Orioles) being named as possible favorites in the Josh Hamilton sweepstakes. Speaking of which, make sure you're getting caught up on all things Hot Stove with Daniel Rathman's Rumor Roundup here at Baseball Prospectus. Now for notes around the AFL, DWL, and VWL.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

A wild pitch costs a man his beer.

I was sitting behind home plate with two scouts once when a foul tip came back to the screen. I flinched. The scouts informed me that the rule is if I flinch I have to buy them a beer. They were just joking. But this guy does have to buy a beer. To replace the one he lost. 

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

January 17, 2012 12:27 am

Future Shock: Cincinnati Reds Top 11 Prospects

48

Kevin Goldstein

The Reds depleted their farm a bit for Mat Latos, but he contributes to one of the top under-25 lists in baseball

Previous Rankings: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

December 12, 2011 9:00 am

Pebble Hunting: These Pitches Three

13

Sam Miller

Javier Lopez, Brad Lidge, and Henry Rodriguez all have unusual offerings you should be aware of.

When writers make lists of the best pitches in baseball, the list usually goes something like this:

1. (Go-to pitch of best pitcher in baseball)
2. (Mariano Rivera’s cutter)
3. (Go-to pitch of second-best pitcher in baseball)
4. (Go-to pitch of third-best pitcher in baseball)
5. (Go-to pitch of fourth-best pitcher in baseball)





The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Taking an in-depth look at a two-inning stint by Francisco Rodriguez in order to understand why he threw certain pitches.

What follows is a story of a pitcher who lost command of his fastball, and a hitter who approached him as if he could throw it to a teacup. The Mets were clinging to a 3-1 lead over the Giants on July 18 as their game entered the late innings at AT&T Park. After another eight-frame master class from Johan Santana, Mets manager Jerry Manuel called on Francisco Rodriguez to lock down a victory. It was a game the Mets desperately needed; they opened the second half of the season by scoring just four runs in their first three games, and if the week following this game is any indication, they aren’t good enough to waste Santana’s brilliance and still make a run at the postseason.

Now that we’ve set the scene, let’s think along with its principal players, and observe how Rodriguez and his opponents adapt—or fail to adapt—to the Mets closer’s uncharacteristic lack of a reliable fastball. We’ll follow K-Rod’s two innings in hopes of learning a thing or two about the mysterious art of pitch sequencing, and see how the information Rodriguez sends with each pitch of this outing may be more predictive of what he’ll throw next than simply relying on his overall tendencies.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 23, 2009 12:09 pm

Lies, Damned Lies: Chasing Bonds

43

Nate Silver

It's A-Rod, not John Law, with a look at whether he will set the all-time mark for career home runs.

We're less than two full years removed from Barry Bonds' somber, strange, and soulless quest to break Henry Aaron's lifetime home-run record. It was a spectacle that most sports fans-even the few like me who were relatively sympathetic towards Bonds' plight-would go to great lengths to avoid having to experience again.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 22, 2009 12:22 pm

On the Beat: Hopped Up or Hopping Mad?

6

John Perrotto

The latest PED-related scandals, politicking in the Windy City and with the WBC, plus other news from around the majors.

You don't need to know exactly what 's available over the counter at the corner Walgreen's in the Dominican Republic to understand that performance-enhancing drugs have been used in Major League Baseball. The past two weeks of non-stop coverage of Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez's admitted steroid use has reminded us hourly of that, and the media, the fans, and even many people inside the game now routinely refer to the period from the mid-1990s until MLB began enacting penalties for PED use in 2004 as baseball's "Steroids Era."

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

January 20, 2009 12:17 pm

Future Shock: Giants Top 11 Prospects

30

Kevin Goldstein

A system topped up with high-upside prospects might field the single most talented squad at any level in any organization next season.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

December 10, 2007 12:00 am

Future Shock: Athletics Top 11 Prospects

0

Kevin Goldstein

A glance at the Oakland prospect crop reveals why Billy Beane is thinking about restocking through a trade of ace Dan Haren.

Five-Star Prospects
1. Daric Barton, 1B
Four-Star Prospects
2. Trevor Cahill, RHP
Three-Star Prospects
3. James Simmons, RHP
4. Henry Rodriguez, RHP
5. Andrew Bailey, RHP
6. Corey Brown, OF
7. Jermaine Mitchell, OF
8. Javier Herrera, OF
9. Jerry Blevins, LHP
Two-Star Prospects
10. Josh Horton, SS
11. Sean Doolittle, 1B















The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

In our last report, the Round Robin playoffs were in the first week of action and the surprising Cibao Gigantes led the pack with a 4 and 1 record, with the weakening Azucareros in last place with a reversed record of 1 and 4. Meanwhile, the heavily-favored Aguilas and Licey were 3-2 and 2-3 respectively, but both were seemingly moving in opposite directions at the time. The Aguilas had won their last two games against Licey, and Licey had lost their last three, looking flat on the field and on the verge of a prolonged losing streak. But on January 9th, second baseman Luis Castillo (Marlins) rejoined the club and D'Angelo Jimenez (Reds) was moved to shortstop for the injured Cristian Guzman (Twins), and that night Licey started a nine-game winning streak that virtually catapulted the team to the final series. The streak tied the longest in the history of the Round Robin playoffs, also established by Licey in 1998. The team had solid offensive performances from Eric Byrnes (Athletics) (.375/.434/.563, and a new playoff record 20 RBI), Jos Offerman (.338/.423/.500), Castillo (.442 OBP), Jimenez (.403 OBP), Timo Perez (Mets), Izzy Alcantara, and at the end of the series, Carlos Pea (Tigers) and Henry Rodriguez, each hitting key home runs in the middle of the winning streak. On the pitching side, Jos Jimenez (Indians) won his four starts with a 1.13 ERA, Vladimir Nuez (Rockies) had a 1.35 ERA in 21 innings, and veteran Rafael Roque was moved from the bullpen to the starting rotation and didn't allow a single run in two starts. These three pitchers were key, because the Tigers lost Juan Cruz (Cubs) after just two starts with an injured non-throwing hand, and Salomn Torres (Pirates), who battled a severe case of the flu, and managed to pitch just two innings in the semifinals.

In our last report, the Round Robin playoffs were in the first week of action and the surprising Cibao Gigantes led the pack with a 4 and 1 record, with the weakening Azucareros in last place with a reversed record of 1 and 4. Meanwhile, the heavily-favored Aguilas and Licey were 3-2 and 2-3 respectively, but both were seemingly moving in opposite directions at the time. The Aguilas had won their last two games against Licey, and Licey had lost their last three, looking flat on the field and on the verge of a prolonged losing streak.

But on January 9th, second baseman Luis Castillo (Marlins) rejoined the club and D'Angelo Jimenez (Reds) was moved to shortstop for the injured Cristian Guzman (Twins), and that night Licey started a nine-game winning streak that virtually catapulted the team to the final series. The streak tied the longest in the history of the Round Robin playoffs, also established by Licey in 1998. The team had solid offensive performances from Eric Byrnes (Athletics) (.375/.434/.563, and a new playoff record 20 RBI), Jos Offerman (.338/.423/.500), Castillo (.442 OBP), Jimenez (.403 OBP), Timo Perez (Mets), Izzy Alcantara, and at the end of the series, Carlos Pea (Tigers) and Henry Rodriguez, each hitting key home runs in the middle of the winning streak.

Read the full article...

December 19, 2003 12:00 am

The A-Rod Negotiations

0

Doug Pappas

Rather than just adding another thousand-or-so words to the million which have been written this week about Alex Rodriguez' negotiations with the Boston Red Sox, the Texas Rangers, the MLBPA, Scott Boras, Bud Selig, and a bunch of angry Red Sox fans, I'll focus on a few specific issues which often seem to be misunderstood.

Why is the MLBPA involved?

To protect its rights under the CBA. Under the CBA, the union negotiates virtually all terms and conditions of employment on behalf of the players. Individual players may only negotiate (1) a salary above the minimum, and (2) special terms which actually or potentially provide additional benefits to the player. Any term inconsistent with these provisions is void even if the club and player agree to it, unless the MLBPA approves the term. Here are the key provisions of the CBA:

Read the full article...

This deal validates the notion that the Rangers were somehow ruined by the signing of Alex Rodriguez, when in fact, Rodriguez has been worth the money. The Rangers' problems have more to do with wasted money on non-contributors, the failure of some B and C pitching prospects, and the absence of a center fielder for years on end. We've reached a point in the trade negotiations between the Rangers and Red Sox where the issues aren't players, but money. Money as in "how much less can the Red Sox pay Rodriguez?" The Sox have been negotiating that point with Rodriguez for some time, and the two sides appear to have an agreement that satisfies both sides, one in which he gets much less guaranteed compensation and assumes a lot more risk. Conceding that we don't yet know exactly how much money he might be giving up to make this happen, I think it's entirely possible that Rodriguez would be doing himself a disservice. Is it reasonable for someone to pay, for the sake of argument, $40 million just to change employers and base cities?

Today, I want to address the Alex Rodriguez mess. I haven't to date, in part because I really don't want Rodriguez to be traded. I joked about it last week, but the relentless flow of top players to a few teams isn't good for the game. This is exactly what didn't happen in the free-agent era until the last two years, when the luxury-tax structure and increased revenue sharing went into effect. Go wait for that to be a sound bite from Bud Selig's next press conference on the success of the newest Collective Bargaining Agreement.

Read the full article...

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries