CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Premium and Super Premium Subscribers Get a 20% Discount at MLB.tv!

Articles Tagged Hearings 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

No Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

July 3, 2012 10:15 am

Overthinking It: Does Arbitration Drive Players Away?

7

Ben Lindbergh

Is a team that takes a player to arbitration really running the risk of driving him toward another team down the road?

​"Why did they trade for me if that's what they think?"Yankees left-hander Jim Abbott, after losing a 1993 arbitration case in which the team used a "very negative" presentation

Imagine, for a moment, that you’ve just accepted a job that requires you to join a union. This union is pretty powerful, but there are limits to its power. The main downside of your new deal is that you can’t control your own fate: for your first several years, you won’t get to choose which company you work for or where you spend most of your time.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 20, 2012 3:00 am

Bizball: Inside the 2012 Salary Arbitration Class

5

Maury Brown

Taking a deeper look at the players who went through (or threatened to go through) the arbitration process this winter

Salary arbitration is a funny thing. In an era when club owners and COOs are more honed in on cost certainty with contracts than ever, few clubs fully know what player payroll for the upcoming season will be until approximately a month and a half before the season begins. Until each player has reached a contract or gone to hearing in the salary arbitration process, you don’t know what each player will ultimately be paid.

This year, I went diving deeper than ever before in salary arbitration, and for the time, I am making all my data for the 2012 salary arbitration season available for download. Here’s the details, plus an explanation as to why the increases, while large, shouldn’t be too surprising on a certain level.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 7, 2012 3:00 am

Bizball: Salary Arbitration Picture Postcards

16

Maury Brown

A look at why salary arbitration is an important and overlooked part of the off-season and which players and teams are involved this year

I’ve been informed (more than once, mind you), that “readers are not interested in salary arbitration.” Which I find stupefying; I can’t believe those watching the game closely aren’t paying (close) attention. Saying that there is no interest in salary arbitration in MLB is kind of like saying there is no interest in free agency. After all, Marvin Miller has said that salary arbitration, not free agency, has likely had a larger impact on the game.

Maybe it’s because the majority of the players involved are rank-and-file. Or, unlike free agency, salaries are (mostly) constrained within certain confines of “comping” to other players and their salaries. Maybe, it’s just that salary arbitration isn’t “sexy.” Whatever. That seems bogus. Readers should care for the same reason that owners, GMs, and MLB organizations care: it influences roster outcomes.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

As teams and players settle in arbitration or avoid it entirely, refresh your memory on how the process works.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

July 28, 2009 12:27 pm

You Could Look It Up: Exhuming McCarthy, Burying Omar

49

Steven Goldman

The controversy over who's been saying what to whom in New York doesn't obscure a problem with accepting responsibility.

If you're a student of Cold War politics, or perhaps just a fan of early R.E.M., Monday's Omar Minaya press conference announcing the termination of Mets Vice President of Player Development Tony Bernazard might have had a familiar ring to it. The moment came when Minaya deviated from his "I'm not going to get into the details" stance to accuse New York Daily News beat writer Adam Rubin of writing reports on Bernazard's inappropriate behavior because, "Adam, for the past couple of years, has lobbied for a player development position."

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 25, 2009 2:01 pm

The Ledger Domain: Salary Arbitration Beats Free Agency

4

Maury Brown

Big scores were struck for the players through the arbitration process this winter.

"Honestly? What's to like about it?"
-Anonymous MLB executive, on the subject of salary arbitration


The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 15, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Smoked

0

Jay Jaffe

Roger Clemens didn't do himself any favors on Capitol Hill, despite his intentions.

I viewed the entirety of Wednesday's Congressional dog-and-pony show from within Fox News Radio's studio, where I was a guest commentator for the proceedings, a situation similar to two months ago when the Mitchell Report was released. Along with host Dave Anthony, I pecked out notes on a computer, oohed and aahed at the revelations, groaned at the grandstanding and waited to get a word in edgewise. The payoff in terms of time spent watching to time spent talking wasn't great, but the chance to talk with fellow guest Jim Bouton, who joined us via telephone from his Massachusetts home, was a treat.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 14, 2008 12:00 am

What We Learned

0

Will Carroll

However much drama there was, yesterday's action on the Hill left most questions unanswered.

All documents referred to in this piece are available at this link. I will try to be as detailed as possible in referring to the documents when possible.

Ignore, if you can, the hearings themselves. For that, you could use the phrase that some Congressmen found so inexplicable: "It is what it is." There was what appeared to be a clear, partisan divide on the Oversight Committee, with the Democrats, led by Rep. Henry Waxman (D-CA) tending to side with Brian McNamee, and with the Republicans tending to side with Roger Clemens. While the questions tended to be focused on credibility rather than policy, about divining truth rather than evidence, the documents that the Oversight Committee collected between their last hearing and this one are stunning in their breadth and openness. In direct opposition to the Mitchell Report, the Congressional collection comes with such a degree of transparency that it's almost startling. At one point, C.J. Nitkowski is promised that they would attempt to keep his conversation confidential; it wasn't much of an attempt, because his statement in full is available without even the slightest redaction. Whether it was the relatively predictable and unenlightening statements, questions, and answers that are now part of the record, the documents published after the hearing are anything but.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 26, 2007 12:00 am

The Ledger Domain: The 2007 Salary Arbitration Results

0

Maury Brown

Summing up the totals on the more than 100 players who filed for arbitration this offseason.

It was the foresight of Marvin Miller, just after Curt Flood lost his challenge of MLB's antitrust exemption in the Supreme Court, that set the stage for the creation of salary arbitration. Miller understood that trying to achieve free agency for players immediately after the Flood ruling was not going to be fruitful, so salary arbitration was offered as an alternative. With the exception of Gussie Busch and Charlie Finley, the owners accepted the process as part of the new deal. Miller saw this as one of the greatest achievements of his early career as executive director of the MLBPA. He correctly anticipated that even though some players would lose their arbitration cases, they would still see a boost to their salaries as compared to not having the process.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

January 31, 2005 12:00 am

The Arbitration Process

0

Thomas Gorman

Over the next three weeks, hearings will be held to determine salaries for dozens of ballplayers. These hearings are the culmination of a process that begins in December, but has its roots in the early 1970s.

Salary arbitration had humble beginnings. The owners were exhausted by holdouts who refused to show up for spring training. The players were sick of having that refusal to play as their sole leverage in contract negotiations. With Flood v. Baseball failing to force a change in the reserve clause, arbitration seemed a reasonable solution.

Ed Fitzgerald, the Milwaukee Brewers Chairman and head of the owners' Player Relations Committee (PRC) in the early 1970s, embraced the idea as a way to neutralize the MLBPA's push for free agency. The Association's arguments against the owners would be weakened if the Lords showed a willingness to submit to binding and independent salary arbitration. Other owners, in particular the A's Charlie Finley and the Cardinals' Dick Meyer (who had experience with binding arbitration when he was labor chief of Anheuser-Busch), were suspicious, claiming that arbitration would drive salaries up. Which it would, compared to the status quo.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

No Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries