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Articles Tagged Hatchet 

Articles Tagged Hatchet

Will Carroll's Under The Knife is called the "industry standard" by Peter Gammons and that's good enough for us. Carroll's groundbreaking work on injuries have led to it becoming a standard part of the discussion in baseball. Whether you're a fantasy fan or checking out how your team will be without a star, there's simply no other place to get this kind of daily information.

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July 15, 2003 12:00 am

Under The Knife: Watching and Waiting

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Will Carroll

Well, we've made it through the Futures Game and Home Run Derby without anyone getting injured. There's still tomorrow's game--the one that "counts"--however, and I'm halfway expecting somebody to go all Pete Rose on some catcher. Let's just hope that the players aren't buying into the hype as much as the entire Fox network seems to be. That said, as expected, it was a quiet day on Monday, which gave people more time to check out the archive of Baseball Prospectus Radio and email me. People were equally divided on whether it was good interview with Jim Palmer or a blindside hatchet job. Let me assure you the truth lies somewhere in the middle, and that Mr. Palmer had more than one opportunity to speak for himself, and he declined each opportunity. I've given his agent the message that he has an open invitation for a full hour on BPR to discuss the game in whatever format he wishes, so I've done all I can to be fair despite my desire to go Paul Teutel on him. Let's hope he does all he can to educate himself about the game he played so well.

That said, as expected, it was a quiet day on Monday, which gave people more time to check out the archive of Baseball Prospectus Radio and e-mail me. People were equally divided on whether it was a good interview with Jim Palmer or a blindside hatchet job. Let me assure you the truth lies somewhere in the middle, and that Mr. Palmer had more than one opportunity to speak for himself, and he declined each opportunity. I've given his agent the message that he has an open invitation for a full hour on Baseball Prospectus Radio to discuss the game in whatever format he wishes, so I've done all I can to be fair despite my desire to go Paul Teutel on him. Let's hope he does all he can to educate himself about the game he played so well.

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July 2, 2003 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: June 26-30, 2003

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Christina Kahrl

Brad Fullmer's down in Anaheim, setting back the defending champs just that much more; the Indians are beginning their youth-movement; Mike Sweeney is taking some time off in Kansas City just when the Royals need him most; Brandon Claussen finally makes it back after the long road through surgery; and BP favorite Kevin Young gets shown the door in Pittsburgh. All this and much more news from around the league in your Wednesday edition of Transaction Analysis.

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March 28, 2002 4:34 pm

Prospectus Feature: .Baseball In Seattle

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Derek Zumsteg

The Seattle Mariners are currently one of baseball's most successful franchises, playing in a beautiful, expensive stadium they didn't pay for, and fielding a well-funded team that won 116 games last season. According to Bud Selig's Guaranteed Accurate 2001 Financial Statement, they paid $18.8 million into the revenue sharing pool, a figure that matched the Florida Marlins' withdrawal from same.

The Seattle Mariners are currently one of baseball's most successful franchises, playing in a beautiful, expensive stadium they didn't pay for, and fielding a well-funded team that won 116 games last season. According to Bud Selig's Guaranteed Accurate 2001 Financial Statement, they paid $18.8 million into the revenue sharing pool, a figure that matched the Florida Marlins' withdrawal from same. They still cleared a cool $14.8 million in profits that the best accountants baseball could hire couldn't cook off the books.

This is an astonishing turnaround for a franchise that as late as 1995 had owners who claimed they would have to move the team to Tampa Bay, a city with a smaller metro population than Seattle (and now, with a team that claimed $21 million in revenue-sharing money last year). For a decade, the Mariners suffered under one of the most deceitful poor-mouthing owners in all of baseball, George Argyros, who ran the team on a shoestring, alienated fans, and cried poor while swimming in money vaults that made Scrooge McDuck quack with envy.

Argyros bought into the Mariners in 1981, purchasing an 80% share for $10.5 million. As part of his takeover, he traded Ticketmaster (then a two-man company with $1 million in revenues) the exclusive contract to sell Mariners tickets in exchange for a 50% share in the Ticketmaster NW franchise. Argyros constantly bad-mouthed his own product, and refused to spend money on players or player development. After just two years, Peter Gammons came after him with a hatchet ("Blame the Owner for Mariners' Woes," The Sporting News, 1983). Argyros threatened to move the team, got a new, even more advantageous lease negotiated, and all the while he booked profits on the team most years.

When he sold the team in 1989 to Jeff Smulyan, his original 80% share of the team made him $50 million, approximately a 20% annual increase in value. Ticketmaster had grown into a dominant company with $600 million in revenue, and even without being able to untangle Ticketmaster's corporate history, I think it's safe to say that Argyros made a huge sum of money there, too.

From 1990 to the middle 1992 season, Smulyan did the same whining about the team that Argyros had done, and made a more serious attempt to move it out of town. At the same time, manager Jim Lefebvre had started to bring the team out of the cellar, a welcome change after years of the worst managers in the game, from the insane Maury Wills to utterly apathetic Dick WilliamsKen Griffey Jr. came up and became the team's best player, and they fielded one of the league's best pitching staffs. In 1991, the Mariners had the first .500 season in their 14-year history.

Even weirder, fans started to turn out. After 14 years pioneering the kind of anti-marketing baseball pushes today, the team won and fans came to one of ugliest multi-purpose stadiums in the league to watch games and cheer their team.

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March 28, 2002 12:00 am

Baseball in Seattle

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Derek Zumsteg

This is an astonishing turnaround for a franchise that as late as 1995 had owners who claimed they would have to move the team to Tampa Bay, a city with a smaller metro population than Seattle (and now, with a team that claimed $21 million in revenue-sharing money last year). For a decade, the Mariners suffered under one of the most deceitful poor-mouthing owners in all of baseball, George Argyros, who ran the team on a shoestring, alienated fans, and cried poor while swimming in money vaults that made Scrooge McDuck quack with envy.

Argyros bought into the Mariners in 1981, purchasing an 80% share for $10.5 million. As part of his takeover, he traded Ticketmaster (then a two-man company with $1 million in revenues) the exclusive contract to sell Mariners tickets in exchange for a 50% share in the Ticketmaster NW franchise. Argyros constantly bad-mouthed his own product, and refused to spend money on players or player development. After just two years, Peter Gammons came after him with a hatchet ("Blame the Owner for Mariners' Woes," The Sporting News, 1983). Argyros threatened to move the team, got a new, even more advantageous lease negotiated, and all the while he booked profits on the team most years.

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