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Articles Tagged Hall Of Nearly Great 

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01-09

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0

Wezen-Ball: Through the Years: Jack Morris
by
Larry Granillo

07-19

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2

BP Announcements: The Hall of Nearly Great Ebook is Available Now
by
Ben Lindbergh

03-07

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Don Mincher, Part 2
by
David Laurila

02-17

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17

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Greatness of Gary Carter
by
Jay Jaffe

01-17

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76

The Lineup Card: 10 Favorite Baseball Movies of All-Time
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-13

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61

Heartburn Hardball: Jack Morris in Motion
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

01-02

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21

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Outfielders, Part I
by
Jay Jaffe

12-30

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41

Prospectus Hit and Run: Morris on the Ballot, Smith to Close
by
Jay Jaffe

12-28

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42

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The First Basemen
by
Jay Jaffe

12-19

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18

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: Middle Infielders
by
Jay Jaffe

11-22

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27

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Golden Era Ballot for the Hall of Fame
by
Jay Jaffe

10-31

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11

Baseball ProGUESTus: Silly Goose: Mariano Rivera and the Myth of the Seven-Out Save
by
Kevin Baker

10-26

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40

The Lineup Card: 13 Bad Players Who Are (or Were) Still Fun to Watch and Root For
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-16

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29

The BP Broadside: "Compiler" Jim Thome for the Hall of Fame
by
Steven Goldman

07-22

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23

Prospectus Hit and Run: Cooperstown's Backhanded Compliment
by
Jay Jaffe

07-20

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22

The Lineup Card: The Top 13 Veterans Committee Selections That Weren't THAT Bad
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-12

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19

The BP Broadside: Memento Mori, Clarence Budington Kelland and Joe Crede
by
Steven Goldman

05-25

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17

The BP Broadside: The Annotated WARP Leaders II: Did Ernie Banks Write the Book of Love?
by
Steven Goldman

02-28

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14

Prospectus Hit and Run: Duke Snider, 1926-2011
by
Jay Jaffe

01-21

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Jack O'Connell, Part II
by
David Laurila

01-14

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3

Prospectus Q&A: J.T. Snow
by
David Laurila

01-12

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32

Another Look: The All-Non-Hall of Fame Team
by
Bob Hertzel

01-06

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28

Prospectus Hit and Run: Blyleven in '11 and Other Tales from the Ballot
by
Jay Jaffe

12-31

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Best of Q&A 2010
by
David Laurila

12-31

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77

Prospectus Perspective: Bagging on Bagwell
by
Christina Kahrl

12-23

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2011: Bagwell and Baggage
by
Jay Jaffe

12-20

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: Class of 2011: Starting Pitchers
by
Jay Jaffe

12-02

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4

Prospectus Q&A: Jimmy Wynn
by
David Laurila

11-30

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2

On the Beat: Tigers on the Off-Season Prowl
by
John Perrotto

11-22

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35

Prospectus Hit and Run: Billy and George
by
Jay Jaffe

09-27

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10

Prospectus Q&A: Ken Burns
by
David Laurila

09-10

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4

Prospectus Q&A: Dave Niehaus and Rick Rizzs
by
David Laurila

08-20

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16

Seidnotes: What Did Brown Do for You?
by
Eric Seidman

08-13

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8

Prospectus Q&A: On Trammell and Whitaker
by
David Laurila

08-10

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32

Checking the Numbers: '90s Nine, Meet the '00s Ten
by
Eric Seidman

06-30

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6

Transaction Action: Disorderly Conduct
by
Christina Kahrl

02-15

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8

Prospectus Q&A: Frank Howard
by
David Laurila

02-02

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19

Transaction Action: Thome, Taveras, and 10,000
by
Christina Kahrl

01-22

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22

Prospectus Hit and Run: O-Dog Waits, Edmonds Campaigns
by
Jay Jaffe

01-13

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77

Prospectus Hit and Run: 10 Men Out
by
Jay Jaffe

01-11

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8

The Week in Quotes: January 4-10
by
Alex Carnevale

01-07

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57

Prospectus Hit and Run: Hawk, Rock, and a Couple of Shocks
by
Jay Jaffe

01-06

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41

Prospectus Hit and Run: Hall of Fame Cases for Pitchers
by
Jay Jaffe

12-31

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8

Prospectus Hit and Run: Hall of Fame Cases for Outfielders
by
Jay Jaffe

12-30

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19

Prospectus Today: Virtual Hall-Worthy Selections
by
Joe Sheehan

12-27

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76

On the Beat: Weekend Update
by
John Perrotto

12-23

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14

Prospectus Hit and Run: Hall of Fame Cases at Third and Short
by
Jay Jaffe

08-23

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8

Prospectus Q&A: Jack Cust
by
David Laurila

08-19

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13

Prospectus Hit and Run: Vlad and the Right Fielders
by
Jay Jaffe

06-28

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Rudy Jaramillo
by
David Laurila

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Looking at the controversial Hall of Fame candidate through contemporary accounts from his early career.

With the Hall of Fame announcement scheduled for this week, now is a good time to look back at the early careers of some of this year's most talked-about nominees. (And with the early exit polls looking as they do, it might be nice to remember just how great some of these players were.)

Jack Morris, longtime anchor of the Detroit Tigers pitching staff, winningest pitcher of the 1980s, and author of one of the most memorable World Series games of all-time, is now in his fourteenth year on the Hall of Fame ballot. Only three years ago, Morris was barely receiving 53% of the vote. Five years ago, it was merely 44%. Today, however, he sits on the verge of election, receiving 67% in the 2012 voting and returning to the ballot as the lead vote-getter. To be honest, the arguments over Morris's Hall worthiness have gone on so long now that it feels nearly impossible to even remember what he was like as a player. For both sides of the debate, "Jack Morris" has turned into a stone idol, representing all that is beautiful and romantic of old-school baseball on one side and all that is vile and oppressive of outdated thinking on the other. His year-to-year and day-to-day strengths and weaknesses have been mostly forgotten or ignored, except when useful in proving a point. Morris, more than any other candidate on the Hall of Fame ballot, may benefit most from a look back at contemporary accounts of his early career.

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Announcing an opportunity to buy an excellent book and support BP in the process.

Four months ago, BP alum Marc Normandin wrote an Unfiltered post about an ebook project that he and fellow BP alum Sky Kalkman were hoping to have funded on Kickstarter. At the time, it was called ​The Hall of Very Good. Now it's called ​The Hall of Nearly Great​. That's not important. What is important is that the project got its funding. And now it's out, and it's excellent. 

Here's an excerpt from the ebook's sell page:

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Remembering the late Don Mincher with a look back at the second part of his BP interview from last year.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

First baseman Don Mincher died on Sunday at age 73. In his memory, we're re-running David Laurila's two-part interview with him, which originally ran as a two-part "Prospectus Q&A" column on January and 11th and 12th, 2011.



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One of the catching greats lost his battle with brain cancer on Thursday.

"It's a man's game, but you have to have a lot of little boy in you to play it." —Roy Campanella

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A look at some of the best (or simply most enjoyable) baseball movies ever made

1) Field of Dreams
To be perfectly honest—and when discussing a movie sewn through with themes of simplicity and the supposed erosion of classic American values, honesty should be required—not only isn’t Field of Dreams my favorite baseball movie, it’s not even my favorite Kevin Costner baseball movie. That, of course, would be Bull Durham, and as both films arrived in theaters when I was in my twenties, Bull Durham’s irreverent comedy was far more likely to strike a nerve than the overwrought sentimentality of Field of Dreams. Enjoying Field of Dreams at that point in my life would have been akin to copping to a fondness for Steel Magnolias. Sure, I made the two hour pilgrimage to the Field of Dreams film location at Dyersville—after all, there’s not much else to break up the drive from Madison to Iowa City—but when I ran the bases and smacked a few batting practice lobs into the left field corn, I did so with a practiced smirk. I rolled my eyes when I overheard comments about how “peaceful” and “pure” the experience was, chuckling at the ongoing squabbles over commercialization between the two families that then owned portions of the site.  I enjoyed myself, reveling in my ironic detachment… until my girlfriend asked me if I wanted to play catch, shattering all my pretension and reminding me that I hadn’t been immune to the film’s melodramatic charms after all.

You see, Field of Dreams may be a Capra movie without Capra, burdened with Costner’s sub-replacement-level Jimmy Stewart, but you can’t deny the power of its Capital M Moment. After ninety minutes of fully ripe Iowa cornball, it’s hard to believe that the appearance of Ray Kinsella’s father and their game of catch could pack such an emotional wallop. It seems completely unearned, but when I saw it in the theater, I teared up—one of only five times a film has done that to me. This was despite (or perhaps because of) the fact that I had a very happy, baseball-filled childhood and didn’t suffer from Paternal Catch Deficiency. What’s more, I’ve had at least a dozen friends or acquaintances tell me they had the same experience of not particularly enjoying the film but welling up during the game of catch. I can’t explain it, and in many ways it’s completely counterintuitive, but it’s true. It happened, and even now I get a little misty just writing about it. Whatever your opinion about Field of Dreams as a whole, it’s hard to deny its ability to get under your skin, and while that doesn’t make it the best baseball movie of all time, it certainly makes it one of the most memorable. —Ken Funck


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A writer who never saw Jack Morris pitch watches him in action for the first time and comes away even less convinced that the traditionalist case for his candidacy should earn him a call to Cooperstown.

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Bernie Williams burned it up with the Yankees during his career, but did the Puerto Rican do enough to blaze a trail to the Hall?

Before Derek Jeter, there was Bernie Williams. As the Yankees emerged from a barren stretch of 13 seasons without a trip to the playoffs from 1982-1994, and a particularly abysmal stretch of four straight losing seasons from 1989-1992, their young switch-hitting center fielder stood as a symbol for the franchise's resurgence. For too long, the Yankees had drafted poorly, traded away what homegrown talent they produced for veterans, and signed pricey free agents to fill the gaps as part of George Steinbrenner's eternal win-now directive. But with Steinbrenner banned by commissioner Fay Vincent and the Yankees' day-to-day baseball operations in the hands of Gene Michael, promising youngsters were allowed to develop unimpeded.

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December 30, 2011 3:23 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Morris on the Ballot, Smith to Close

41

Jay Jaffe

Jay Jaffe and JAWS examine the starting pitchers on this year's Hall of Fame BBWAA ballot, starting with the inevitable Jack Morris.

After delivering the JAWS piece on first basemen earlier this week, I had planned to tackle the outfielders—Tim Raines, Bernie Williams et al—next. The sad news of Greg Spira's untimely passing on Wednesday presented me with a reason to change course, however. In the service of working on a chapter on Jack Morris’s Hall of Fame case for Extra Innings: More Baseball Between the Numbers in November, I had called upon the Internet Wayback Machine to unearth Greg's seminal research piece questioning whether Morris "pitched to the score." a piece that was published in Baseball Prospectus 1997, predating Morris’s arrival on the BBWAA ballot by a three years and Joe Sheehan's own outstanding Morris research by five years. I suggested to Dave Pease that we republish it on our site to run alongside yesterday’s article in tribute to our fallen colleague and friend, a fine example of his intellectual curiosity and dogged research efforts, particularly as the work dated to a time when Retrosheet was in its infancy and the relevant data not easily compiled. This piece is dedicated to his memory.

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December 28, 2011 3:30 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The First Basemen

42

Jay Jaffe

The new JAWS runs up against players from the Steroid Era to determine their Hall worthiness.

As with comedy, timing is everything in baseball. "Hitting is timing," Hall of Famer Warren Spahn said famously, finishing the thought with the complementary observation, "Pitching is upsetting timing." A good chunk of both the game's traditional and advanced statistics, the ones that we spurn and those that we celebrate, owe plenty to being the right man in the right place at the right time—wins, saves, and RBI from the former camp, leverage, run expectancy, and win expectancy from the latter. ERA owes everything to the sequence of events. For better or worse, MVP votes are won and lost on the timing of a player's productivity, or at least the perception of it that comes with being labeled "clutch." Timing is a major part of how we measure the game, so it should matter when we look over the course of a player's career in evaluating his fitness for the Hall of Fame.

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December 19, 2011 1:45 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: Middle Infielders

18

Jay Jaffe

Only one middle infielder passes the revamped JAWS' standards for Hall of Fame induction.

The past year has been a great one for JAWS, the Hall of Fame evaluation system whose creation marked my first contribution to Baseball Prospectus back in 2004 (I didn't name it until the next go-round). In 2011, two overly qualified candidates for whom I've advocated for the better part of a decade were finally elected. In January, Bert Blyleven received 79.7 percen tof the Baseball Writers of America vote, becoming the first player ever to gain entry on his 14th ballot. In December, the late Ron Santo received 93.8 percent of the vote from the Golden Era committee, a bittersweet result given his passing just a year ago but a vindication of what we've known here for years, that he too was worthy of a bronze plaque.

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How well do the players on the Golden Era ballot stack up to Hall of Fame standards?

The Hall of Fame's Golden Era ballot has been out since November 3, offering 10 familiar names from the 1947-1972 era for Cooperstown consideration. This isn't the Veterans Committee anymore; when last year's reforms were announced, the words "Veterans Committee" were conspicuously omitted from all press releases. Rather, it's the second of three Era Committees to get its turn at bat, following last year's Expansion Era Committee, which voted on players from the 1973-1989 period and managers, umpires, and executives from 1973 to the present. Theoretically, next year’s panel will consider candidates from the Pre-Integration period (1871-1946), but the Hall has changed the rules so often lately that all bets are off.

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Is Goose Gossage right to say that Mariano Rivera has it "easy?"

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Kevin Baker is a novelist and historian who is currently at work on a social history of New York City baseball, to be published by Pantheon.


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