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Articles Tagged Hall Of Fame 

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01-12

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7

Baseball Therapy: Put Russell In the Hall of Fame
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-06

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3

Players Prefer Presentation: The Seattle Fan's Guide To HOF Happiness and Heartbreak
by
Meg Rowley

01-06

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: The Case for Tim Raines
by
Rany Jazayerli

01-06

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7

Daisy Cutter: On the HOF Voters Who Take It Seriously
by
Sahadev Sharma

12-10

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2

BP Unfiltered: The Piazza-but-not-Bagwell Voter
by
Sam Miller

11-18

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0

Prospectus Feature: Commence Retirement Tour
by
Alex Skillin

05-20

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7

The Lineup Card: Seven Memories of Randy Johnson's Hall of Fame Career
by
Baseball Prospectus

04-29

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3

The Lineup Card: Memories of Craig Biggio's Hall of Fame Career
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-09

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9

Daisy Cutter: Candidate Obituaries for the Zero Percenters, Part 2
by
Sahadev Sharma

01-07

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22

Ninety Percent Mental: Are Secret Ballots Ruining Cooperstown?
by
Lewie Pollis

01-07

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7

Daisy Cutter: Candidate Obituaries For the Zero Percenters
by
Sahadev Sharma

01-07

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5

Skewed Left: An Astro for the Ages
by
Zachary Levine

01-06

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19

Moonshot: The Changing Hall of Fame Criteria
by
Robert Arthur

12-31

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70

BP Hall of Fame Voting
by
Baseball Prospectus

12-30

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34

Baseball Therapy: How to Vote Strategically for the Hall of Fame
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-21

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11

Pebble Hunting: Hank Aaron's Hypothetical Fortune
by
Sam Miller

09-29

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: So long Abreu; Farewell, Willingham
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-28

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 501: News from the Hall of Fame Front
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

07-28

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21

The HOF Rule Change
by
Mike Gianella

07-28

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0

The Week in Quotes: July 21-27, 2014
by
Nick Bacarella, Morris Greenberg, Chris Mosch and Nick Wheatley-Schaller

07-25

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4

The View from the Loge Level: Ode to Joe
by
Daron Sutton

01-24

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19

Raising Aces: Classic Deliveries: Fade to Black and White
by
Doug Thorburn

01-17

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9

Raising Aces: Classic Deliveries: Hall of Fame Inductees 1980-89
by
Doug Thorburn

01-16

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0

TINSTAAPP: TINSTAAP Episode 17: Offseason Chatter
by
Paul Sporer and Doug Thorburn

01-10

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: The Old You're In, You're Out
by
Joe Sheehan

01-10

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9

Raising Aces: Classic Deliveries: Hall of Fame Inductees of 1990-94
by
Doug Thorburn

01-09

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23

Baseball Therapy: The Hall of Fame Ballots By the Numbers
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-09

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1

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 361: Jay Jaffe on the Top Takeaways from the Hall of Fame Election Season
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

01-09

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22

A Vote for Transparency
by
Lewie Pollis

01-08

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9

Overthinking It: What Scouts Said About 2014's Top Cooperstown Candidates
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-08

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13

The Lineup Card: Seven Pioneers Worthy of Hall of Fame Induction
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-08

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1

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 360: Scouting 2013 Hall of Fame Candidates
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

01-07

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21

Skewed Left: What the 1936 Hall of Fame Ballot Tells Us About Today's
by
Zachary Levine

01-06

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 358: Is Hall of Fame Balloting Really Broken?
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

01-05

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46

BP Hall of Fame Voting
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-28

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14

Baseball ProGUESTus: Rethinking Hall of Fame Standards in Expansion Eras
by
Kevin Whitaker

01-03

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2

The BP Wayback Machine: The Nose Knows
by
Steven Goldman

01-02

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25

Skewed Left: Better Versions of Bad Hall of Fame Arguments
by
Zachary Levine

12-18

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4

Baseball ProGUESTus: The (Ad) Age of Heroes: Judging the 2014 Hall of Fame Candidates by Their Commercials
by
Michael Clair

12-12

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11

Skewed Left: A Cooperstown Party Like it's 1999
by
Zachary Levine

11-27

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3

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 338: Giving Thanks for Your Emails
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

11-19

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26

Pebble Hunting: The Hall of Fame 50 Percent Probability Test
by
Sam Miller

11-15

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4

BP Unfiltered: Things the Hall of Fame is Not the Hall of, According to a Quick Search
by
Ben Lindbergh

11-14

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 329: The Debate About Buying a Hall of Fame Vote
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

09-23

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 292: Scott Boras' World Series Plan/A-Rod, Manny, Pettitte and the Hall
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

09-16

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3

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 287: Preparing for Postseason Narrative-Building/Guerrero, Helton, and the Hall of Fame
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-19

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 268: Clayton Kershaw and Cooperstown/Xander Bogaerts and Historic Years for Young Talent
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-08

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5

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 261: Mike Trout and Becoming the Best Ever/Chase Utley's Aging Outlook
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

07-02

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3

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 236: Analysts as General Managers/Hall of Fame Probabilities
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

04-23

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1

BP Announcements: Cooperstown, SABR Team Up to Create New Scouts Interactive Database
by
Joe Hamrahi

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Start the bandwagon: The next criminally underrated HOF candidate is today's criminally underrated superstar.

I might be a little biased, but I think that if there’s something that last week’s Hall of Fame results needed, it was more inductees named Russell. With Russell Branyan not eligible for election (and in legal trouble), things have been looking kinda bleak. But something else happened in last week’s results that gives me hope. Other than that guy who’s going in with a backwards cap, catcher Mike Piazza finally got his spot in the Hall of Fame.

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Ken Griffey Jr. will get inducted. Edgar Martinez will not.

The 2016 Hall of Fame inductees will be announced later today. Ken Griffey Jr. will be voted in; Edgar Martinez will not be. Other ballots have included former teammates, of course, but rarely have two figures up for simultaneous consideration been as thoroughly, undyingly beloved by their fan base as Griffey and Martinez. Especially interesting is how they occupy tail ends of the fan Bell curve now that each one’s place in history is legislated.

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How has the argument changed in the last 15 years? Let's go back to the time of his retirement and find out.

Later today we'll find out just how close Tim Raines came to the Hall of Fame in his second-to-last year on the ballot. Until then, we take a look back at what the case for him looked like at the time of his retirement. This article originally ran on March 31, 2000.

Last Friday, The Daily Prospectus contained a short sermon on the Hall of Fame worthiness of just-retired Tim Raines. Judging by the results of an ESPN.com poll that same day, not everybody was paying attention.

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Today, you will see many a bad ballot go viral. Focus instead on the hundreds of voters who make the HOF what it is.

The drive from Utica to Cooperstown is a bit of a fog. The anticipation of what awaited me and my family is not. It’s what my summer had revolved around for weeks. I don’t remember much else from our trip to upstate New York, but our trek to the National Baseball Hall of Fame will forever be etched in my mind. My dad buying my brother a wooden crimson baseball bat with a Cincinnati Reds insignia on it. (My brother had a few baseball-player obsessions back then, with Eric Davis being first and foremost.) The three of us laughing at a picture of Amos Otis when we walked through the museum—it was an inside joke that I don’t fully remember the origin of. And of course, finally seeing all the plaques of the many legends about whom I’d heard so much—being still too young to have any playing-day memories of any enshrined players. Jim Palmer and Joe Morgan stand out the most, having both been inducted just a few weeks prior. I was 9.

***

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What one small decision might tell us about the people who make it.

Over at Fox Sports, I wrote about the patterns that show up in different HOF voter types. Like, people who vote for Bonds almost always also vote for Clemens. That’s the obvious one, but there are all sorts of other interesting ways you can predict who a voter will vote for based on who else they voted for. Go read The Three People You Meet In Hall of Fame Voting.

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David Ortiz announces this will be his final season. His accomplishments are plentiful.

On January 22, 2003, the Red Sox signed David Ortiz to a one-year, $1.25 million contract. At the time, the deal hardly triggered any attention at all, even among the most obsessed baseball fans in Boston. Our Transaction Analysis on the move dedicated half a sentence to noticing it.

The Red Sox were Ortiz’s third different organization, and having turned 27 that offseason he was well past the point of being considered a noteworthy prospect. Ortiz had shown some intriguing power up to that point in his career and even slugged .500 over 125 games for the Twins in 2002. Still, he hadn’t made enough of an impression to stick around, and Minnesota released him that offseason after six years with the team. Few could imagine him serving as more than a bench bat in Boston.

That he became so much more is the reason why, over 13 years later, the news that Ortiz will retire after the 2016 campaign sparked dismay among Red Sox fans and immediate debate regarding what his ultimately legacy will be. But any arguments over whether a designated hitter belongs in the Hall of Fame should take a back seat for the time being, for Ortiz’s career, regardless of whether he ends up in Cooperstown, is one worth marveling at.

For the first half of that 2003 season, Ortiz was battling for playing time with Jeremy Giambi and Kevin Millar. After Giambi suffered a shoulder injury, a regular spot opened up for Ortiz, and he’s been Boston’s starting DH ever since. Ortiz batted .288/.369/.592 with 31 home runs in 128 games that year, the type of sterling numbers he’s produced nearly every summer for over a decade.

Back in 2003, the Red Sox didn’t just sign a hitter who improved their lineup; they signed one of the more prolific sluggers of his generation. In an era of immense success in Boston, the club’s good fortune in signing Ortiz is as responsible for the franchise’s three World Series titles as the front office Theo Epstein put in place or the deep pockets of John Henry.

Of course, what is so remarkable about Ortiz is how long he’s excelled against big league pitching. Over the past 13 years, Ortiz has averaged 34 home runs per season with a .288/.385/.566 line during that time span. The fact he has sustained such tremendous numbers while approaching his 40th birthday only adds to how impressive his career has been. In 2015, Ortiz became just the third hitter since 1901, after Barry Bonds and Steve Finley, to belt more than 35 home runs in his age-39 season, according to Baseball Reference’s Play Index tool. He also became just the third hitter during that span to slug over .550 in his age-39 season after Bonds and Ted Williams.

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The second in a four-part series honoring this year's inductees.

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The first in a four-part series honoring this year's inductees.

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Saluting the even better players who didn't make it to next year's ballot.

I’ll never forget when I decided to pursue my dream of becoming a sports journalist. I was driving home from another boring day at my internship and talking on the phone with my brother. He asked me if I was excited to be graduating from college in a few months and I admitted that I wasn’t too thrilled about it. He pressed and I told him that I didn’t want to be an engineer, I wanted to work in sports. He then laughed at me when I pointed out that there was no point, because I was too old to try to switch careers—I was 24, my brother five years my senior. He simply said, “If that’s your dream and you think you’re good enough, just go and do it.” It was the push I needed, the support I was looking for to take a crazy leap. I can’t thank my brother enough for doing that for me. There have been numerous other people I’ve befriended along this journey, many of whom I looked up to either personally or professionally, who said or wrote me something that helped keep me going when I was ready to give up.

I tell this story because it was brought to my attention that veteran Reds reporter Hal McCoy gave Aaron Boone one of the two votes Boone received for the Hall of Fame. On its face, that seems a bit odd, but, according to this column, it turns out McCoy had a pretty nice reason to give Boone a vote.

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January 7, 2015 6:00 am

Ninety Percent Mental: Are Secret Ballots Ruining Cooperstown?

22

Lewie Pollis

Identifying the discrepancies between public and private ballots from yesterday's vote.

There are a lot of things wrong with the Hall of Fame vote. There’s the fact that the recent bar for enshrinement is set far higher than it’s been in the past (especially for pitchers). There’s the 10-vote-per-ballot limit, even in a year when there are probably 18 candidates I’d vote for if I could. There’s the belated moral panic about PEDs that holds back anyone who is remotely suspected of having used them (no matter how baseless or arbitrary the rumors) even though there are plenty of both dopers and cheaters already in Cooperstown. And then there’s the fact that Kenny Lofton fell off on his first ballot.

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January 7, 2015 6:00 am

Daisy Cutter: Candidate Obituaries For the Zero Percenters

7

Sahadev Sharma

Saluting the players who didn't make it to next year's ballot.

It’s likely that much of the discussion currently going on in the baseball world is of who got in the Hall of Fame, if they were deserving, and the travesty of those who didn’t make it but should have. I enjoy that discussion to an extent, but I also don’t see much value in debating people who have a fundamentally different view on things, especially when it comes to PEDs. I, and I’m assuming many of you, have heard all the arguments for or against allowing players suspected of or who have admitted using PEDs into Cooperstown. Other than time, I don’t really see what’s going to change the mind of anyone who has done the proper amount of research* on the subject.

*Apparently to some, doing actual research instead of just trusting our eyes and often-flawed memories is something to be mocked.

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January 7, 2015 6:00 am

Skewed Left: An Astro for the Ages

5

Zachary Levine

Craig Biggio is a well-deserving Hall of Famer and the first Astro to be enshrined, but it's odd that he may not even be the best player eligible for Cooperstown on his Astros teams.

Fifty-three years into a lifespan that’s included—to various degrees of infuriation—one decade of infantile ineptitude, two more of talent and teases, another of almost-excellence and a most recent of putridity, the Houston Astros have their first Hall-of-Famer.

Other Hall of Famers have played for the Astros – Nolan Ryan and Joe Morgan, who had significant time in Houston, did, as did some forgotten Astros and Colt .45s like Robin Roberts, Nellie Fox and now Randy Johnson—he of two months service.

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