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Articles Tagged Gutty 

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02-06

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35

Western Front: Scrappy Rain, Scrappy Rain
by
Geoff Young

11-06

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0

Transaction Analysis: May 12-15, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

10-04

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1

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Game Three: Not Such a Pitchers' Duel
by
Jay Jaffe

03-31

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10

The BP Broadside: Questions, Predictions, Worries, Distractions, and Other Mysteries of Opening Day, National League
by
Steven Goldman

03-25

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What You Missed: 3/21-3/25
by
Stephani Bee

01-13

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11

Transaction Analysis: AL Central Moves, Picking Up a Penny, and More
by
Christina Kahrl

09-01

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51

Under The Knife: The Toughest Month for Injury News
by
Will Carroll

04-09

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21

Under The Knife: Rewind and Forward
by
Will Carroll

03-11

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4

Team Health Reports: San Diego Padres
by
Will Carroll

05-16

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0

UTK Wrap: Not Just the Usual Suspects
by
Will Carroll

05-14

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Under The Knife: Thumbs Down
by
Will Carroll

10-27

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World Series Prospectus: Game Four Diary
by
Christina Kahrl

06-30

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Transaction Analysis: June 27-29
by
Christina Kahrl

06-19

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0

Under The Knife: Money Not Well Spent
by
Will Carroll

06-12

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Under The Knife: Heads Will Roll
by
Will Carroll

10-05

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Under The Knife: Playoff Health Report: AL
by
Will Carroll

06-24

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Breaking Balls: Framing the Debate
by
Derek Zumsteg

05-25

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Transaction Analysis: May 20-24, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

05-04

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Teams: A Critical Guide
by
Jonah Keri

02-04

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Team Health Reports: Philadelphia Phillies
by
Will Carroll

01-28

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Under The Knife: Goin' South
by
Will Carroll

08-28

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Under The Knife: A Rush of Blood to the Head
by
Will Carroll

04-16

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Testing the Nexus
by
Lee Sinins and Will Carroll

09-06

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Transaction Analysis: August 31-September 4, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

06-17

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Transaction Analysis: June 12-14, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

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June 30, 2006 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: June 27-29

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Christina Kahrl

In today's Transaction Analysis, Christina comments on the Brett Myers situation, watches another team turf Tony Womack, and doesn't exactly shower Ned Colletti with praise for his latest manuever.

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June 19, 2006 12:00 am

Under The Knife: Money Not Well Spent

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Will Carroll

A more forward-looking approach is the best way to address baseball's PED issues, according to Will. That plus updates on Mark Prior, Dave Roberts and lots of Dodgers.

Powered by my dad--if a day late--on to the injuries:

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June 12, 2006 12:00 am

Under The Knife: Heads Will Roll

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Will Carroll

After catching up with the Jason Grimsley story, Will has bad news for A's and Cubs fans, and tries to make sense of the Red Sox' rotation woes.

It's interesting to see the reactions around sports to this, including comparisons of baseball's policy to those of other sports (short version: baseball's is stronger) and for the reaction to Congressional calls for blood testing (short version: baseball may end up being the only union that may not fight it). This week's BP Radio heartened me. After spending the first hour focused on the draft, our local call-in hour centered on the Grimsley case. Not one call came in, an unusual occurrence. I'd normally be bothered by that, but I think we've gone past the point of most people caring. Absent big names or more solid evidence, I doubt my statement that "This is the big one."

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October 5, 2004 12:00 am

Under The Knife: Playoff Health Report: AL

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Will Carroll

Every AL playoff team has at least moderate health questions as the postseason kicks off.

That's one hundred million dollars (and xx/100 cents.) It's the admission price to the American League playoffs. The Twins are the lone representative of fiscal conservatism to make it into October. Billy Beane is looking for his next advantage, J.P. Ricciardi is scouting the wires, and the rich are getting richer.

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June 24, 2004 12:00 am

Breaking Balls: Framing the Debate

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Derek Zumsteg

If you watch the home team broadcast, almost every start by a home pitcher isn't just good, it's great. No, it's outstanding. Just plain fantastic. It was a gritty, gutty start. And that's for a six-inning, 9-hit, 4-walk, 2-strikeout start where the pitcher sees four runs cross the plate. He worked himself out of some tough jams. He literally put out some fires (the use of literally to mean figuratively causing writers and English majors across the country to literally grind their teeth). That's to be expected. After all, the broadcasts are, first and foremost, marketing tools for the team. I shouldn't get frustrated when baserunning gaffes are excused, or a hitter's awful hacks are ignored. I do, but I shouldn't. When we find nuggets of serious analysis, or discussions that aren't flattering to the team, or even criticism of botched plays, it's a bonus.

If you watch the home team broadcast, almost every start by a home pitcher isn't just good, it's great. No, it's outstanding. Just plain fantastic. It was a gritty, gutty start. And that's for a six-inning, 9-hit, 4-walk, 2-strikeout start where the pitcher sees four runs cross the plate. He worked himself out of some tough jams. He literally put out some fires (the use of literally to mean figuratively causing writers and English majors across the country to literally grind their teeth).

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May 25, 2004 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: May 20-24, 2004

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Christina Kahrl

Zack Greinke finally gets the call in Kansas City. Jason Giambi hits the DL for the Yanks. Richie Sexson comes off and returns to the DL for the D'backs within a matter of days. Ben Petrick retires after revealing he's been battling a horrible disease for the past three years. And Dennis Tankersley gets another shot in San Diego. All this and much more news from around the league in your Tuesday edition of Transaction Analysis.

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May 4, 2004 12:00 am

Teams: A Critical Guide

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Jonah Keri

Lost in the glitz of Sosa, Wood and Prior among Cub stars is the club's All Star-caliber third baseman, Aramis Ramirez. Jim Hendry pulled off a steal of a deal last July, snagging Ramirez, Kenny Lofton and enough cash to cover a big chunk of Ramirez's leftover '03 salary for the forgettable Jose Hernandez, B-level pitching prospect Matt Bruback and player to be named later Bobby Hill, who while possessing the most upside of the trio, also had ample holes in his game and is now a 26-year-old semi-prospect, still waiting to click. The beauty of the deal wasn't just the Cubs' ability to land two key contributors for last year's playoff run. It was securing Ramirez for the affordable rate of $6 million in 2004. While he'd struggled badly in 2002 and early '03, much of those struggles stemmed from injuries, including a bad ankle injury that took him far longer to overcome than most expected. Still, this was the same Ramirez who hit .300./350/.536 in his first full big league season at age 23, the same Ramirez who showed huge power as he climbed the minor league ladder. He could stand to ratchet up his plate discipline a bit, but you're still talking about an elite player at a key defensive position who turns 26 this season, won't break the bank this season and could be the rare free agent worth paying to retain long-term. Railing against Pittsburgh owner Kevin McClatchy and his money-hoarding reign of error won't win any pennants. Having the presence of mind to fleece the Pirates in their stupor just might.

I know that's a disappointment to many of you, what with a lowly Canadian such as myself summoned from the pen to relieve Steve Goldman and his many and wondrous obscure literary references. It's like Randy Choate getting called in to relieve Roger Clemens after 14 Rocket strikeouts, or even Tex Clevenger taking over for Whitey Ford in his prime, vying to protect a no-hitter like some tragic Yeatsian figure:

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Today BP debuts the second season of Will Carroll's Team Health Reports. Over the next few weeks, Will will cover all 30 teams, rating each team's lineup, starting rotation and closer on a three-color scale: red light for significant injury risk, yellow light for light to moderate injury risk, green light for minimal injury risk. First installment: the Philadelphia Phillies.

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January 28, 2004 12:00 am

Under The Knife: Goin' South

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Will Carroll

It seems there's one case like this every year, but I can't remember one that had the potential to be as significant. With Aaron Boone down and likely out for the season due to a significant tear to his left ACL, the Yankees are scrambling to not end up with Drew Henson at the hot corner. The Yanks will be calling all the usual suspects looking for some help, but Brian Cashman seems ready to play hardball to get some financial recompense. According to the AP, Cashman is ready to invoke a clause in the standard player contract that specifically cites basketball as a prohibited activity. The Yankees are reportedly waiting for final results, but since Boone damaged his knee nearly two weeks ago, this sounds like a stall. While I'll leave the fallout to the Yankees lineup to others in this site, I'll look to the injury itself. The most similar injury I could find was the near complete tear of the ACL suffered by B.J. Surhoff in the early days of 2002. Surhoff missed the entire season, but was able to return for spring training 2003. Expect a similar timeframe for Boone. The Yankees got better news on Steve Karsay. After shoulder surgery last year, Karsay was able to throw from a mound over the winter, but won't throw breaking balls until pitchers and catchers report. That will be his big test and will determine whether Karsay will be immediately penciled in as one of the Yanks top set-up men or whether he'll miss the start of spring training. Even if healthy now, Karsay remains one of the bigger risks in pitching.

Powered by more of that great Peet's coffee, on to the injuries...

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August 28, 2003 12:00 am

Under The Knife: A Rush of Blood to the Head

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Will Carroll

So there I was, sitting at Victory Field, ready for the last three-hour baseball talk-fest of the season, ready with facts, opinions, and data at my fingertips. I expected calls and debates and excitement for one of the best "pennant chases" of recent memory. And Larry Bird had to go and screw the whole thing up. You see, I live in a state where basketball is king and one legend pink-slipping another is big, big, big news. Baseball was pushed aside and for about 40 minutes, and I had to talk hoops. It was an ugly scene. Tonight, let's stick to baseball. Oh, and how cool is it that Julio Franco finally admitted his age?

Oh, and how cool is it that Julio Franco finally admitted his age?

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April 16, 2003 12:00 am

Testing the Nexus

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Lee Sinins and Will Carroll

One of the glaring weaknesses in the injury analysis game is the lack of data. As the injury database is built and populated, we are left with spotty research and anecdotal knowledge, especially when it comes to the crossroads of sports medicine and pitcher workloads. Adding to the problem is the lack of data for both minor league and college pitching. Since pitching is pitching, opponents of workload limitations often bring this up. In one of the first systematic studies of early pitching workload, Lee Sinins, creator of the Sabermetric Baseball Encyclopedia, studied 135 pitchers who threw 175 innings or more before the age of 22.

In one of the first systematic studies of early pitching workload, Lee Sinins, creator of the Sabermetric Baseball Encyclopedia, studied 135 pitchers who threw 175 innings or more before the age of 22. Age 22 is equivalent to the age-point found in Nate Silver's study on pitcher injury and age--the Injury Nexus--but was selected by Lee prior to the publication of Nate's study. Lee selected the pitchers from The Sporting News 1997 Baseball Register, giving us a distant enough perspective on many of the pitchers and allowing objective analysis on the possible effects of heavy workloads at such a young age. Unfortunately, innings thrown in winter leagues or in spring training could not be counted in this study as the data were not available. Innings were not adjusted for level and the totals are a sum for all levels in a season.

There were a few basic theories being tested in this study. First, the injury nexus would be tested. Despite the strong correlations between age and injury found by Nate Silver, real world numbers should match up closely. Second, while somewhat arbitrary, the 175-inning threshold seems to be a point where fatigue sets in for almost all pitchers. Young pitchers usually have not reached this threshold in their careers and the first test of this level often results in injury, massive failure, or a survivor effect.

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