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Articles Tagged Greg Maddux 

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12-14

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22

Raising Aces: The Good Old Days: Greg Maddux
by
Doug Thorburn

05-18

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20

Raising Aces: All About Injuries
by
Doug Thorburn

05-15

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5

Painting the Black: Living Low and Away
by
R.J. Anderson

04-22

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9

Wezen-Ball: The Cubs, the A's, and a Music Video
by
Larry Granillo

12-09

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8

On the Beat: Santa Jerry Comes to Town
by
John Perrotto

10-14

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20

Spinning Yarn: The Glavine Line
by
Mike Fast

07-08

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8

Seidnotes: The K/BB Ratio
by
Eric Seidman

02-17

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: Tom Glavine
by
Jay Jaffe

12-09

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13

On the Beat: The Winter Meetings
by
John Perrotto

09-01

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11

Prospectus Preview: Labor Day's Games to Watch
by
Caleb Peiffer

08-21

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0

Transaction Analysis: Senior Circuit Shuffling
by
Christina Kahrl

08-19

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Prospectus Toolbox: WHIP-ping Through the Mailbag
by
Derek Jacques

05-18

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Every Given Sunday: Lightning in a Bottle, Thunder in the Bronx
by
John Perrotto

04-29

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Prospectus Preview: Tuesday's Games to Watch
by
Caleb Peiffer

02-07

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Prospectus Hit and Run: Tandemonium
by
Jay Jaffe

08-31

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Prospectus Matchups: Grab Bag
by
Jim Baker

08-24

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Prospectus Matchups: Voting Oddities and Reinventing the Iron Man
by
Jim Baker

07-03

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Prospectus Today: Relative Virtue
by
Joe Sheehan

08-15

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Prospectus Game of the Week: San Francisco Giants @ Los Angeles Dodgers, 8/13/06
by
Derek Jacques

03-23

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2006--Setting the Stage
by
Keith Woolner

09-15

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Breaking Balls: More on Greatness
by
Derek Zumsteg

02-20

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Transaction Analysis: February 17-19, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

02-20

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Prospectus Today: Sweet Home Chicago?
by
Joe Sheehan

04-10

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Prospectus Today: www.reallygoodrighthandedpitchers.com
by
Joe Sheehan

03-25

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Surveying the Authors
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-22

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6-4-3: Maddux vs. Atlanta - Son of Big Exciting Contest
by
Gary Huckabay

10-25

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From The Mailbag: Pete Rose, Mike Marshall, and K-Rod
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-20

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Greatest Living Pitcher
by
Keith Woolner and Jonah Keri

08-02

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The Daily Prospectus: Angels, Umpires and Legends
by
Joe Sheehan

11-07

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0

Staff Ballots
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-12

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0

Prospectus Awards Balloting
by
Baseball Prospectus

11-20

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0

1999 Internet Baseball Awards Results
by
Greg Spira

10-29

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1998 Internet Baseball Awards Results
by
Greg Spira

10-08

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Playoff Preview - Atlanta vs. San Diego
by
Christina Kahrl

06-19

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Pitcher Abuse Points
by
Rany Jazayerli

11-10

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1997 Internet Baseball Awards™ Results
by
Greg Spira

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December 14, 2012 9:31 am

Raising Aces: The Good Old Days: Greg Maddux

22

Doug Thorburn

Perhaps no modern pitcher has had mechanics, or results, as consistent as Greg Maddux.

The legend of Greg Maddux already has a life of its own, and he has been retired for only four years.  The widely held perception of the bespectacled right-hander centers on his reputation as “the smartest pitcher who ever lived,” and the prevailing wisdom tends to overlook the raw talents that he brought to the mound. Maybe it's the glasses, with the clichéd connection between poor vision and intelligence. It could be the K rate, which hovered around the major-league average through his career, or maybe it was the indelible impression of a 42-year old Maddux retiring massive sluggers with an 85-mph fastball, but this was not a pitcher who survived only on guile while mentally calculating triple-integrals for every pitch thrown.

Maddux's reputation for intelligence was well-earned, as he had a cerebral approach to pitching and advanced knowledge of his craft. Maddux understood the concept of Effective Velocity long before Perry Husband had conducted his extensive research on the subject, thanks to Maddux's recognition of the relationship between pitch location and batter timing. He knew that a hitter had to begin his swing earlier in order to hit the ball squarely on a pitch located up and in, but that the hitter had a longer time to react to a pitch that was low and away. He also followed the words of Warren Spahn, who said, “Hitting is timing. Pitching is upsetting timing.”

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May 18, 2012 3:00 am

Raising Aces: All About Injuries

20

Doug Thorburn

What are the real mechanical precursors of pitcher injury? And what is the real lesson of Mark Prior's injury history?

Pitching mechanics are a bit like long-snappers in football, in the sense that we hear about them only when something goes horribly wrong. Mechanics rarely enter the discussion until a pitcher gets hurt, but when an ace succumbs to injury, the village folk grab their torches and pitchforks to go on the hunt for blame.

Experience has taught me that there is rarely an isolated cause for a pitcher's injury, with confounding variables that include mechanics, conditioning, workloads, genetics, and plain old luck. The pitching delivery is a high-performance machine, with a multitude of moving parts that must work efficiently in concert for the system to perform at peak levels, and any weak link in the system can lead to a breakdown.

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May 15, 2012 3:00 am

Painting the Black: Living Low and Away

5

R.J. Anderson

Kyle Drabek has found his quadrant.

Writing that Kyle Drabek is no stranger to great expectations oversimplifies things. Drabek is the son of one Cy Young award winner, and he was traded for another before he had thrown a pitch in the majors.  Those bloodlines are invaluable in baseball. Good genes can ensure athleticism, yes, but they can also prevent a player from wilting under the hot stadium lights. The physical stuff is easy for Drabek—his hammer curve, and a fastball that can touch the mid-90s, can get big-league hitters out, thanks for asking. The mental stuff is supposed to be, too—scouts labeled him a bulldog multiple times during last spring; this tells you about his mindset (and excuses his occasional barking at hitters). Yet last season, both the physical and mental parts of Drabek fell apart.  

For a time, Drabek made pitching in the bigs look easy. His first start in 2011 was a one-hitter spread over seven innings against an incumbent division winner. He would allow four runs over his next two starts. From that point on, Drabek met the wrath of major-league hitting. He would complete 60 more innings as batters hit .314/.416/.508 against him; Joey Votto, your sixth-place finisher in National League MVP voting, hit .309/.416/.531 last season. Back to the mental part of baseball: the idea is that failing in baseball is unavoidable and difficult. You need to be cut from a special psychological cloth to persevere and, more importantly, to adjust. In summation: failure is nature’s best educational tool. Drabek took this lecture seriously and spent the offseason working on his mechanics. Shi Davidi chronicled Drabek’s transformation:

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An amazing music video featuring a World Series game between the Cubs and the A's was unearthed recently.

It was 1992. The Oakland A's, behind Tony La Russa, Rickey Henderson, Dennis Eckersley, and the Bash Brothers, were only a year removed from a three-year run in the World Series. The Cubs, meanwhile, had been to the playoffs once in eight years, and Greg Maddux was only just beginning his stretch as the greatest pitcher alive. Away from sports, Garth Brooks had friends in low places, Pearl Jam was destroying the charts, and Uncle Jesse was breaking little girls' hearts all over the world. Not to be forgotten, Chicago Cubs fan Richard Marx was dreaming of a World Series win for the North Siders.

From this early-'90s potpurri, a music video was born. No, it wasn't "Jeremy" or even that silly Beach Boys video that had Uncle Jesse up on stage drumming. Not even close.

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December 9, 2010 9:00 am

On the Beat: Santa Jerry Comes to Town

8

John Perrotto

Owner Jerry Reinsdorf writes another check to keep the White Sox competitive, along with other news and notes from around the major leagues.

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Florida—Santa Claus was roaming the lobby of the Swan and Dolphin Resort for a good chunk of Wednesday afternoon. However, few people seemed to notice. Perhaps it was because this Santa was not wearing a red suit and a white beard. Instead, White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf wore business casual.

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Attempting to plot the career path of those who may reach the 300-win plateau.

I’m excited to join Baseball Prospectus. If you’ve read any of my previous work, you may know me as something of a PITCHf/x guy. I’ve been learning about and writing about PITCHf/x since the pitch-tracking system was installed in major-league ballparks in 2007, so that description is apt. My interests extend beyond PITCHf/x to the physics of baseball and the details of the pitcher-hitter confrontation.

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Cliff Lee's number of strikeouts opposed to walks is at record-setting proportions this season.

Most of the time when I begin writing or researching an article, the spark comes from seeing something noteworthy on MLB Tonight or in the box scores while checking to see how my fantasy team is performing. At the beginning of the week, Jered Weaver’s strikeout rate piqued my interest, which led to a rather long-winded but informative article on the reason for his vast spike in the rate as well as whether or not it held precedent. Today, the story is a bit different, but along similar lines, as after watching the last couple of innings of Cliff Lee’s most recent start—one in which he issued a walk and whiffed 11 hitters—I could not help but think about his extremely impressive strikeout-to-walk ratio. The guy has walked just six batters in 103 2/3, innings, while striking out 89, leading to a K/BB ratio of 14.83 that, yes, leads the entire sport.

It wasn’t exactly Lee’s ratio that got the motors in my mind churning, however, but rather the actual rate itself. I mean, the rate is used so frequently these days and has essentially been imprinted—no, not imprinted like in the Twilight movies… wait, did I just implicitly reveal I’ve seen all three?—into our statistical vernacular, but can anybody tell me who is credited as its inventor or when its rise to prominence began? I rummaged through my library, re-read most of Alan Schwarz’ The Numbers Game, and even Googled like a madman and still turned up nothing discussing the origin of the rate. It is a perfect example of a number that makes so much sense to use for several different purposes, yet whose origin has somehow managed to elude us. That isn’t to say that knowing the creator or how it was derived is important, but as an analyst it is always interested to learn where stats come from.

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February 17, 2010 11:39 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Tom Glavine

16

Jay Jaffe

A look at the stylish left-hander's Hall of Fame chances through the prism of JAWS.

The other day I set out to write a piece covering the Hall of Fame cases of both Frank Thomas and Tom Glavine. Two thousand or so words in, I was neck deep into the Big Hurt's career, so I decided to spin the Glavine piece into a separate one. In parallel, Marc Normandin did a thorough job covering the ups and downs of Glavine's career, so rather than repeat what he's done, I'll skip to evaluating his Hall of Fame case and the context surrounding it.

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December 9, 2008 12:20 pm

On the Beat: The Winter Meetings

13

John Perrotto

An all-time great bids us farewell, while the Veterans Committee says "no" again to almost everyone.

LAS VEGAS-Greg Maddux is not a numbers guy, but Scott Boras is. It was no surprise when Boras, the most well-known agent in baseball, rattled off a string of statistics while recounting his client's accomplishments on Monday, as Maddux announced his retirement after 23 seasons to kick off the Winter Meetings at the Bellagio. Boras put Maddux' career neatly into perspective when he pointed out that to match the right-hander's career a pitcher would need to have 22 seasons' worth of 16 victories, 33 starts, and 226 innings pitched.

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September 1, 2008 12:10 pm

Prospectus Preview: Labor Day's Games to Watch

11

Caleb Peiffer

Mets and Brewers in a possible NLDS preview, Cliff Lee gets all historical, and the Orioles face the Byrd.

Today's Full Slate of Games

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August 21, 2008 11:25 pm

Transaction Analysis: Senior Circuit Shuffling

0

Christina Kahrl

Moving Maddux, muddling Mets, and wherever shall the illustrated man go next?

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Answering a few readers questions, and addressing the relative merits of a few metrics.

Yes, I know, another mailbag article. All I can say in my defense is that as long as folks send me thought-provoking e-mails, I'm going to get distracted and run a little off-course. So it's all your fault, really.

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