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Articles Tagged Good Process 

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09-18

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31

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Agony of Rational Rooting
by
Nick Piecoro

03-06

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24

Future Shock: Rangers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-29

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12

Prospectus Preview: AL West 2012 Preseason Preview
by
Jason Parks and Jason Wojciechowski

01-31

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23

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: What Could Go Wrong in 2012: Los Angeles Angels
by
Jason Parks

01-19

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Roger Abrams
by
David Laurila

12-20

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15

Overthinking It: Keeping Up with the Friedmans
by
Ben Lindbergh

12-12

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107

Prospectus Hit and Run: Braun Banned for PEDs [Version 9]
by
Jay Jaffe

08-16

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Going Over Slot
by
Kevin Goldstein

08-16

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27

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: Right Field
by
Jason Parks

08-11

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45

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: Center Field
by
Jason Parks

08-04

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32

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: Left Field
by
Jason Parks

07-19

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29

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Caught Up in the Complex League
by
Jason Parks

06-09

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21

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: Left-Handed Pitchers
by
Jason Parks

05-30

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10

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: U Got the Look: Fielding, Part II
by
Jason Parks

05-19

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11

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: U Got the Look: Fielders, Part I
by
Jason Parks

04-20

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Larry Rothschild
by
David Laurila

03-07

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2

Prospectus Q&A: The MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference
by
David Laurila

02-21

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0

The Week in Quotes: February 14-20
by
Alex Carnevale

02-14

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0

The Week in Quotes: February 7-13
by
Alex Carnevale

01-04

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Bob Kipper
by
David Laurila

12-21

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33

Future Shock: Milwaukee Brewers Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-14

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14

GM for a Day: Kansas City Royals
by
John Perrotto

08-29

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2

Between The Numbers: The PITCHf/x Summit Quasi-Liveblog
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-13

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8

Prospectus Q&A: On Trammell and Whitaker
by
David Laurila

07-21

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38

Transaction Action: ALtruisms
by
Christina Kahrl

06-16

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22

Under The Knife: Gain a Pitcher, Lose a Pitcher
by
Will Carroll

05-27

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Scott Kazmir
by
David Laurila

05-13

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Mark Shapiro
by
David Laurila

04-23

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5

On the Beat: Friday Update
by
John Perrotto

04-11

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13

Inside The Park: The Disparate Paths of Andy Marte and Michael Brantley
by
Bradford Doolittle

03-16

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5

Expanded Horizons: Don't Count Out The Diamondbacks
by
Tommy Bennett

01-26

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Terry Reynolds
by
David Laurila

01-25

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63

Prospectus Roundtable: Analyzing RoboPitcher
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-13

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5

Prospectus Q&A: Mark Rogers
by
David Laurila

01-06

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Pedro Grifol
by
David Laurila

12-31

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3

The Year in Quotes
by
Alex Carnevale

12-29

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61

Future Shock: A's Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

12-27

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2

Prospectus Q&A: Jim Riggleman
by
David Laurila

12-07

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35

Future Shock: Twins Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-22

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23

Prospectus Today: Infield Free Agents Review
by
Joe Sheehan

11-22

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1

Prospectus Q&A: Brian Butterfield
by
David Laurila

11-20

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34

Future Shock: Indians Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-12

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68

Future Shock: Red Sox Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

09-09

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5

On the Beat: Midweek Update
by
John Perrotto

08-17

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6

The Week in Quotes: August 10-16
by
Alex Carnevale

08-09

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14

On the Beat: Weekend Roundup
by
John Perrotto

05-20

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4

Prospectus Q&A: Toby Harrah, Part 2
by
David Laurila

01-28

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43

Future Shock: Red Sox Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-04

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Tony Blengino
by
David Laurila

12-07

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Dick Scott
by
David Laurila

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Can rational fans pull for fluky teams, or are we bound to support good process over unpredictability?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Nick Piecoro is in his sixth season as a beat writer covering the Arizona Diamondbacks for ​The Arizona Republic and azcentral.com. Once an all-glove, no-stick Little Leaguer, he grew up playing APBA games in the suburbs of Phoenix. If he’s not writing or talking or watching baseball, he’s probably listening to or watching or falling asleep to music, movies, or television shows. You can follow him on Twitter @nickpiecoro.

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March 6, 2012 3:00 am

Future Shock: Rangers Top 11 Prospects

24

Kevin Goldstein

Despite recently graduating or trading many of their top prizes, the Texas system still has plenty of intriguing names left.

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February 29, 2012 3:00 am

Prospectus Preview: AL West 2012 Preseason Preview

12

Jason Parks and Jason Wojciechowski

The two Jasons dissect the pressing questions facing the Rangers, Angels, A's, and Mariners this season.

PECOTA Team Projections
Record: 89-73
Team WARP: 45.7
Runs Scored: 719
Runs Allowed: 648​
Team FRAA: 37.6






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Genuflect, genuflect, genuflect to Mike Trout and his supernatural powers.

Prospect #1: OF Mike Trout
Background with Player: My eyes; industry sources.
Who: It’s a little cheap to include Trout in these rankings; after all, he belongs at the major league level in 2012 and already accrued 40 games there in 2011. But this is my series and I can do what I want, and what I want to do is wax poetic about Mike Trout. The 20-year-old prospect is not a mystery to man; he has been on the prospect landscape since a breakout debut campaign in 2009 put him on the map and an even greater sophomore season peeled back the layers of his superiority and left the baseball world with a top tier talent. Trout can do just about everything on a baseball field, with elite speed, a near-elite hit tool, plus power potential, a plus-plus glove, and enough arm to grade around average. That’s a legit five-tool talent, and while we are being honest here, if given a choice of any prospect in baseball to build a team around, I’d take Trout over Harper, I’d take Trout over Moore, and I’d take Trout over Profar. I’ve only seen the kid play five times in two years, but each time his performance triggered an internal existential debate: Is Mike Trout the archetype of the modern player? Is Mike Trout a baseball deity?

What Could Go Wrong in 2012: Trout’s physical skills are straight out of your favorite fables, but he’s only 20 and those post-biblical skills aren’t refined. As a right-handed hitter, Trout struggled with his first-taste of major league quality stuff, especially arm-side stuff on the inner half of the plate, be it sharp fastballs, benders with depth, or sequencing that kept him guessing on both. I fully expect to see more struggles of this variety in 2012, as Trout should pound lefties and remain inconsistent against the arm-side. To his benefit, Trout has lightning-fast hands and strong wrists which give him good bat control and contact ability. With those attributes, his contact rates should climb in 2012, but negotiating the difficulties associated with electric arm-side stuff is something you can only overcome through exposure, and setbacks are intrinsic to that process. In the end, Trout could be a perennial MVP candidate as a Gold Glove-caliber center fielder that is going to hit over .300, reach base at a high clip, slug 20 homers and a ton of doubles, steal bases, and change the fortunes of the Angels franchise more than their recent free agent additions. The Church of Trout starts here.



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Talking arbitration with long-time baseball arbitrator, professor, and author Roger Abrams.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

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If EVERYONE has a brilliant GM, does ANYONE have a brilliant GM? Or are standout GMs going the way of .400 hitters?

There is an industrywide understanding now—a lot of teams spend a lot of time on this. There is a constant understanding that you need to find the next area of opportunity.—Mark Shapiro

The ideas that at one time were innovative are now mainstream.—Sandy Alderson

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National League MVP has tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs and faces a 50-game suspension barring an unprecedented overturning of the result.

This story was initially published around 8:30 PM ET on Saturday night and has since been revised several times as new information has emerged. Please scroll down to see updates.


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The signing deadline for amateur draftees passed last night, but concerns about the system remain.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

Read the full article...

While Bryce Harper is the cream of the crop in right field, as it turns out, there are other legit corner outfielders in the minors.

Well, friends, this is it, the final installment in the series (although I am planning on doing a recap article, so I guess that’s not entirely true). It’s been an exercise within an exercise, and by this point in the minor-league season, the initial lists in the series are obsolete. I’d hang myself with the arbitrary noose of the process, but I thought it was fun to compile, and the constant [read: pestering] correspondence with my sources strengthened my willingness to correspond with my sources. Let’s call it professional growth.

Throughout the 11-part series, I’ve tried to put a spin on traditional rankings by mixing up the formula, either by manipulating the display or profiling players based on characteristics other than their present skill level. At times the waters were murky, but I’m a lake man, so I prefer the dangerous swill of that liquid to the pellucid waters of the norm. I wanted to create conversation and consternation, rather than consensus and contentment. One of my biggest pet peeves is the need to make everything black and white, right or wrong, good or bad. Baseballs might come in a box, but the end result should never fit comfortably back into one, so I try to encourage the debate that stems from dissatisfaction, even when the debate is firmly rooted in general ignorance and internet chest inflation.

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A rare breed of player can stay at an up-the-middle position, and many of these center fielders have loaded toolboxes.

The minor leagues are stacked with quality center-field prospects, and some might even end up being quality center fielders at the major-league level. But the truth is most minor-league center fielders lack the necessary skill set to play the position in the majors, making the value of said skill set even more, um, valuable.

This was a difficult list to compile, as I use a mixture of industry opinion and my own eyes to sketch the report, and opinions were extremely varied. I’m incredibly fortunate to have a national platform that encourages industry correspondence and reciprocation [read: people actually return my e-mail] more than discourages it, and I’m thankful because most industry types aren’t influenced by my 70-grade smile. For this article, I polled 10 people employed by major-league teams; some were scouting directors, some were scouts, some were even higher on the food chain. I asked them a simple question: Who are the top 10 center-field prospects currently in the minor leagues?

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Though left field may be where players head when they can't play anywhere else on the diamond, there are still some solid prospects at the position.

By the time my phone stopped ringing, and the text messages stopped being texted, and the e-mail stopped finding my inbox, I was left with over 100 outfield prospects with a vote of scout approval listed in my notes. That’s a sprawling canvas to work with, and the opinions were so varied that I needed to alter my approach to this article. So far in this sprawling prospect series, I’ve made every effort to narrow the positional class, usually starting with the “Leader of the Pack (Present),” continuing to the “Leader of the Pack (Future),” followed by the high-ceiling talents, the middle-tier talents, the sleepers, and finally the head-scratcher of the group, leaving a tally of 10-15 players, all of whom have legitimacy in their class. But the talent pool in left field is abstract, as it’s a position that is usually occupied with the deficient spoils of other positions, (center field, second base, etc.), and that opens the queue to a wide range of talent. That puts the onus of positional projection on those I asked, and those opinions were too varied to follow the established construct. So for this specific section of the Positional Primacy series, we have to take another road home.

Here’s my idea: Instead of trying to fit the collection of talent into the established tiers [read: those cute little aforementioned tiers], let’s just make it simple and present the prospects in two categories: “High-Ceiling Division” and “Not-Quite-the-Ceiling-of-the-‘High-Ceiling-Division’-but-Still-Packs-a-Prospect-Punch Division.” Let’s offer up the material in scouting snapshots rather than full-length scouting essays, and let’s free ourselves from the burden of listing every middle-tier prospect at the position, which would keep me here for the rest of my life, writing reports on players like Angelo Songco or Jake Smolinski, and basically drinking myself to death to dull the pain in my fingers. I had to make some choices.

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While you will burn your neck and suffer heat stroke watching prospects develop in the Arizona League, there is a small oasis of potential stars that makes the pilgrimage worth it.

It’s hard to sell complex league baseball to the masses: The talent is immature, the names are merely names, the jerseys are often vague and free of personal identification, the environment is isolated and empty, and the theater of the event is off-off-off-off Broadway. But I’m going to give it a try.

What will it take to get you to walk away with a piece of Arizona League baseball in your hand? Financing is available for those who qualify, and if you wilt under the weight of my smile, I might be able to throw in a refrigerator magnet, or a flavored lolly for the little ones. Let me know if I can be of any assistance. I think you would look great with some AZL action in your life. It makes you attractive to the sex of your choosing. Don’t be shy. Here at Baseball Prospectus, we offer the best package. Don’t be fooled. You can’t match our guarantees. Look around, and let me know if you have any questions. My door is as open as my saccharine smile. Let’s make a deal.

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