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Articles Tagged George W. Bush 

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After the 1991 season, Commissioner Fay Vincent used his annual State of the Game address to declare: "The present salary situation is out of hand and small-market franchises cannot compete in this environment." This in a year when the Minnesota Twins won the World Series, the Pittsburgh Pirates won their second of three consecutive NL East titles, and the Yankees finished 20 games under .500! In fact, of the four division winners, only Pittsburgh had even the third-highest payroll in its division. Toronto and Minnesota ranked fourth, while Atlanta ranked fifth.

Table 14. Marginal Payroll/Marginal Win, 1990

Team W L Pct Marg 8/31 MLB Marginal Marginal $/ Wins Payroll Payroll Marginal Win Baltimore 76 85 0.472 27.9 $8,087,702 $5,287,702 $189,713 Boston 88 74 0.543 39.4 $22,848,698 $20,048,698 $508,850 Cleveland 77 85 0.475 28.4 $15,394,298 $12,594,298 $443,461 Detroit 79 83 0.488 30.4 $17,848,737 $15,048,737 $495,024 Milwaukee 74 88 0.457 25.4 $18,453,999 $15,653,999 $616,299 NY Yankees 67 95 0.414 18.4 $20,592,948 $17,792,948 $967,008 Toronto 86 76 0.531 37.4 $18,193,500 $15,393,500 $411,591 California 80 82 0.494 31.4 $21,960,389 $19,160,389 $610,203 Chi WSox 94 68 0.580 45.4 $11,462,310 $8,662,310 $190,800 Kansas City 75 86 0.466 26.9 $23,617,090 $20,817,090 $774,854 Minnesota 74 88 0.457 25.4 $14,162,299 $11,362,299 $447,335 Oakland 103 59 0.636 54.4 $22,669,834 $19,869,834 $365,254 Seattle 77 85 0.475 28.4 $12,591,199 $9,791,199 $344,761 Texas 83 79 0.512 34.4 $12,803,035 $10,003,035 $290,786 Chi Cubs 77 85 0.475 28.4 $13,831,702 $11,031,702 $388,440 Montreal 84 77 0.522 35.9 $16,472,220 $13,672,220 $380,611 NY Mets 91 71 0.562 42.4 $22,229,333 $19,429,333 $458,239 Phldelphia 77 85 0.475 28.4 $14,156,000 $11,356,000 $399,859 Pittsburgh 95 67 0.586 46.4 $15,550,000 $12,750,000 $274,784 St. Louis 70 92 0.432 21.4 $19,647,498 $16,847,498 $787,266 Atlanta 65 97 0.401 16.4 $14,188,833 $11,388,833 $694,441 Cincinnati 91 71 0.562 42.4 $15,819,728 $13,019,728 $307,069 Houston 75 87 0.463 26.4 $18,229,781 $15,429,781 $584,461 LA 86 76 0.531 37.4 $20,943,107 $18,143,107 $485,110 San Diego 75 87 0.463 26.4 $16,718,332 $13,918,332 $527,210 San Fran 85 77 0.525 36.4 $22,456,224 $19,656,224 $540,006

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The White Sox may try and make a Juan Pierre out of Willie Harris. The Cardinals hope to shake off a rough Opening Day performance. The Rangers' early schedule won't do them any favors. These and other news and notes in today's Prospectus Triple Play.

  • Small-Ball Bugbear: "He told me to run, run, run," said Willie Harris about the green light given him by Ozzie Guillen this year, consequences be damned. "He told me if I get thrown out, who cares? Be aggressive."
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    June 20, 2003 12:00 am

    Lovable Losers

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    Steven Goldman

    Steven Goldman takes on the Tigers' and Padres' flirting with a .300 winning percentage with a history lesson on some of baseball's most renowned losing clubs.

    Since 1901 only 19 teams have crossed that great divide, nearly half of them from Philadelphia. From the 1935 Boston Braves--a team so bad it changed its name to get away from itself--to the 1952 Pirates "Rickey Dinks"--the mental misfire of a genius--to Casey Stengel's Amazin' Mets of 1962, the <.300 teams are always good for a chuckle. Hey, kids! It's Marvelous Marv Throneberry! Look, sports fans! A team so bad not even Babe Ruth can save it! Cue laugh track. Hilarity ensues.

    This column is not as much about hilarity as it is about honesty. Only one of these losing teams, the 1962 Mets, was up front about its chances. The disclosure came from the manager. "We are frauds," Stengel said, "but if we can make losing popular, I'm all for it." The rest of them purported to be making a game effort to win, but for various reasons they instead succeeded in losing.

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    April 25, 2003 12:00 am

    Bye Bye, Bud?

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    Doug Pappas

    Yesterday, Commissioner Bud Selig announced his intention to retire when his current five-year term expires on December 31, 2006. I'll believe it when I see it. Selig claims never to have wanted the Commissionership. Less than a month after becoming Acting Commissioner on September 9, 1992--after leading the insurgency which forced his predecessor Fay Vincent to resign in midterm--Selig told Hal Bodley of USA Today that he planned to remain in office "two to four months." In December 1992, he assured Claire Smith of the New York Times that he had "zero interest in the job."

    Selig claims never to have wanted the Commissionership. Less than a month after becoming Acting Commissioner on September 9, 1992--after leading the insurgency which forced his predecessor Fay Vincent to resign in midterm--Selig told Hal Bodley of USA Today that he planned to remain in office "two to four months." In December 1992, he assured Claire Smith of the New York Times that he had "zero interest in the job."

    Another baseball insider was very interested in the job: the managing partner of the Texas Rangers, one George W. Bush. As Fay Vincent relates in his autobiography, Bush called him several months after his ouster to say, "Selig tells me that he would love to have me be commissioner and he tells me that he can deliver it." Vincent responded that he thought Selig wanted the job for himself. Months passed. Selig continued stringing Bush along--"he told me that I'm still his man but that it will take some time to work out." Finally Bush had to choose between running for Governor of Texas or waiting for Selig to deliver on his promise. As Vincent told the Miami Herald earlier this year, "If it hadn't have been for Bud Selig, George W. Bush wouldn't be President of the United States."

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    If the Bartolo Colon trade was some big Selig conspiracy, how come Minaya offered Colon a $50-million, four-year extension? Bud had to approve that contract. Only after Colon rejected it, did Minaya trade him. Why wasn't that mentioned? Oh, I get it - if it's A FACT but it doesn't fit the conspiracy template/make Bud look bad in EVERY situation template - just ignore it. The end always justifies the means when it is Bud we are attacking. I don't mind opinionated journalists, but when you ignore important facts to make your argument look better, it destroys your credibility. Is BP's urge to bash Bud that strong that you must always embellish your pro-MLBPA side and ignore facts that might weaken your argument? --KS

    THE APPEARANCE OF MISCONDUCT

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