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Articles Tagged Game 1 

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01-30

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5

Wezen-Ball: The 1948 World Series, Game1: A Radio Diary
by
Larry Granillo

07-16

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19

Bizball: Playing the MLB All-Star Game Television Ratings Game
by
Maury Brown

04-06

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12

Pebble Hunting: The Pacers
by
Sam Miller

11-18

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15

Baseball ProGUESTus: Why Having a Quick Hook Helps
by
Mitchel Lichtman

11-03

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2

The Lineup Card: 9 World Series Heroes: The Year After
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-20

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: The Importance of Being 1-0
by
Rany Jazayerli

10-19

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23

World Series Prospectus: The Midwest Showdown
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-06

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4

The BP Wayback Machine: Is the Best of Five the Worst of Series?
by
Mike Carminati

10-05

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24

The Lineup Card: 10 Players Whose Careers Were Defined by Big Postseason Moments
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-15

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8

Prospectus Hit and Run: Fast Breakers
by
Jay Jaffe

08-04

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1

The Asian Equation: Finding Relief from NPB
by
Michael Street

07-12

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11

Spitballing: The Future is Now
by
Jeremy Greenhouse

06-23

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7

Resident Fantasy Genius: The Pursuit of Wins
by
Derek Carty

06-20

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0

Prospectus Hit List: AL: Sox Hanging On
by
Tommy Bennett

06-07

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0

Prospectus Hit List: NL: Something Brewin'
by
Jay Jaffe

06-06

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0

Prospectus Hit List: AL: The Colon Train Chugs Along
by
Tommy Bennett

05-23

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4

Prospectus Hit List: The Tighten Up
by
Jay Jaffe

03-04

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5

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Impact of World Series Starts (or How Much Was Jack Morris Really Worth?)
by
Sean Smith

03-02

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12

Spinning Yarn: How Accurate is PitchTrax?
by
Mike Fast

01-19

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41

Manufactured Runs: The Twilight of the Gods
by
Colin Wyers

11-11

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7

Spinning Yarn: Pitcher Release Points
by
Mike Fast

11-05

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13

Changing Speeds: The BSAT Answer Key
by
Ken Funck

10-27

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16

World Series Prospectus: Fall Classic Memories
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-26

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19

World Series Prospectus: World Series Preview
by
Christina Kahrl

10-15

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30

Playoff Prospectus: NLCS Preview: Phillies vs. Giants
by
Christina Kahrl

10-14

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17

Playoff Prospectus: ALCS Preview: Rangers vs. Yankees
by
Jay Jaffe

10-06

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46

Prospectus Hit List: The Finale
by
Jay Jaffe

10-05

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19

Playoff Prospectus: ALDS Preview: Twins vs. Yankees
by
Jay Jaffe

09-29

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11

Prospectus Perspective: Front Fours
by
Christina Kahrl

08-27

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3

Prospectus Hit List: AL: Over The Cliff Lee
by
Jay Jaffe

07-23

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28

Ahead in the Count: Buyers and Sellers
by
Matt Swartz

06-30

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9

Prospectus Hit and Run: Jacktastic!
by
Jay Jaffe

06-18

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2

Campus Notes: College World Series Preview
by
Charles Dahan

06-15

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9

Prospectus Hit and Run: Year of the Pitcher?
by
Jay Jaffe

06-11

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3

Campus Notes: Super Regionals Preview, Part 2
by
Charles Dahan

06-10

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1

Campus Notes: Super Regionals Preview, Part 1
by
Charles Dahan

03-14

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9

Circling The Bases: Cleaning Up the (Run-Scoring) Environment with EPA
by
Tim Kniker

03-09

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4

Prospectus Hit and Run: NL Central Competitive Ecology
by
Jay Jaffe

11-13

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8

Prospectus Hit and Run: Digging the Long Ball
by
Jay Jaffe

11-01

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8

You Could Look It Up: He Should Have Picked Lee
by
Steven Goldman

10-29

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6

Prospectus Hit and Run: From One to the Other
by
Jay Jaffe

10-28

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25

World Series Prospectus: Yankees versus Phillies Preview
by
Jay Jaffe

10-15

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33

Playoff Prospectus: Dodgers vs. Phillies LCS
by
Jay Jaffe

10-08

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7

Playoff Prospectus: Angels versus Red Sox LDS
by
Christina Kahrl

10-07

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5

Playoff Prospectus: Dodgers versus Cardinals LDS
by
Jay Jaffe

09-18

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6

Prospectus Hit List: Comebacks and Shutdowns
by
Jay Jaffe

09-01

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14

Ahead in the Count: Home-Field Advantage, Part Four
by
Matt Swartz

08-14

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23

Prospectus Hit List: Getting Their Money's Worth... Or Not
by
Jay Jaffe

08-07

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15

Prospectus Hit List: The Post-Shuffle Shuffle
by
Jay Jaffe

07-24

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5

Prospectus Hit List: Halladay to Holliday
by
Jay Jaffe

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A running diary of the two-hour radio broadcast of game 1 of the 1948 World Series, featuring Bob Feller and Johnny Sain.

Last week, Ben Lindbergh let us all in on the secret treasure trove of 50- and 60-year old radio broadcasts that Craig Robinson at Flip Flop Fly Ballin' recently uncovered. It's a pretty fantastic find, with games ranging from the 1948 World Series to a late summer game between the White Sox and Red Sox in the Impossible Dream season.

While Ben had a few things to say about Game 5 of the 1948 World Series, I recently listened to the full two-hour broadcast of Game 1 of the same series, a tight pitcher's duel between Bob Feller and Johnny Sain. Even for a game played when Jackie Robinson was the reigning Rookie of the Year, the game, at one-hour and forty-two minutes long, was a speedy affair. By contrast, Game 1 of the 2012 World Series between Justin Verlander and Barry Zito lasted three-hours and 26-minutes.

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Ratings for the MLB All-Star Game were up this year, but does that really tell the whole story?

Television ratings are a funny thing. The spin that can come out of the numbers can drive reports in wildly divergent directions. In sports, ratings can be spun to say that the popularity of a given league or club is high or low, depending on those feeding the information. Of course, leagues and clubs love to tout growth, while detractors can spin numbers negatively. For Major League Baseball, ratings have been used to show that the game’s popularity is on the rise, while others have pounded keys to say that it’s a “dying sport.”

So, which one is it? As is often the case in data analysis, the truth can lie in the middle. Before we get started, let’s give a quick primer on what the ratings numbers mean.

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On Opening Day, the action is new, but the jokes are old.

There’s a Robert Frost poem called “Icewater Puddles” that you’ve probably read. It’s about a young husband who walks slowly along a snowy path to his factory job each day but then races back home in the evening, because he’s so excited to see his wife. The closing couplet is, of course, this:

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You might not know it from watching the World Series, but it often makes sense for a manager to pinch hit for his starter before the late innings.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Mitchel Lichtman, or MGL, has been doing sabermetric research and writing for over 20 years. He is one of the authors of The Book: Playing the Percentages in Baseball, and co-hosts The Book blog, www.insidethebook.com. He consulted for the St. Louis Cardinals from 2004 to 2006, as well as other major-league teams. He holds a B.A. from Cornell University and a J.D. from the University of Nevada Boyd School of Law. Most of the time these days you can find him on the golf course.


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A look at how World Series icons performed after their October heroics

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Does dropping the first game of the World Series to the Cardinals mean Texas is in trouble?

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

In the wake of the Cardinals' Game 1 victory, revisit Rany's investigation of what it means to go down 1-0, which originally ran as a "Doctoring the Numbers" column on October 28, 2001.

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Sizing up every facet of each contender in this season's Fall Classic.

The Breakdown

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As three series head to Game Fives, we dig up an investigation of the five-game format's fairness.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

As we prepare for the three remaining Division Series to be decided, revisit Mike Carminati's case for switching to a longer series format, which originally ran on November 2, 2006.


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10 players who, regardless of how well or poorly they played during the regular season, experienced career-defining moments in the playoffs

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August 15, 2011 12:15 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Fast Breakers

8

Jay Jaffe

A look at the two players at each position that have been the most valuable to their teams since the All-Star Break.

Over the past week, Justin Upton has launched about 1,300 feet worth of home runs into the stratosphere while helping the Diamondbacks reel off six straight wins against the Astros and the Mets to take over first place in the NL West. The 23-year-old slugger has 10 homers since the All-Star break, tied for third in the majors, while the Snakes' overtaking of the Giants stands as the only major upheaval to the standings since the Midsummer Classic. At that recess, four of the divisions (all three in the AL plus the NL Central) featured leads of one game or less, with the widest division lead at 3.5 games and the NL Wild Card gap at four games. Now, just three races are closer than four games, and one Wild Card is practically sewn up, while the other is no closer than it was before.

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August 4, 2011 12:17 am

The Asian Equation: Finding Relief from NPB

1

Michael Street

In his fifth Asian Equation column, Michael looks at the relievers who have enjoyed modest success--and failure--making the move from Japan to America.

The last group in my analysis of the player’s who have migrated to MLB from Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) are the relievers, the least appreciated members of a successful baseball team. Yet, of all NPB imports, they have been the most numerous (explaining the length of this article, for which I apologize in advance) and the cheapest. Diminished quality is the most obvious reason for these extremes, since starters who don’t meet MLB standards get shifted to the bullpen, and lesser talents also keep salaries down. Additionally, the typical NPB pitcher’s arsenal matches well with an MLB reliever’s skillset.

As I discussed in my last Asian Equation article, NPB is a breaking ball league, which translates better to relief than starting. A good breaking ball might fool major league hitters the first or second time they see it in a game, but it probably won’t the third or fourth time. As an illustration, here’s how batter OPS rises against two of the biggest NPB starting-pitcher busts as compared with three current MLB pitchers: the best, the most mediocre, and an old junkballer. While MLB batters’ performance improves against each pitcher the more times they see him in a game, the change is far more dramatic with Matsuzaka and Kawakami.

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Evaluating each pitcher who appeared in the Futures Game and identifying the most similar current major-league pitchers and pitches with the aid of PITCHf/x.

Sample size or apple pies? You can choose only one. Apple pies—that’s what I thought. A quick glimpse of a prospect might not tell us all we need to know, but it’s still plenty tempting to draw possibly premature conclusions. With that in mind, I decided to watch the Futures Game for the second straight year and make snap judgments on every single pitcher, even though none of them threw more than a couple dozen pitches. Last year, my main takeaway was that Zach Britton was the man. He still is. This year, I came to the conclusion that the only way to top a Bernie Williams rendition of the national anthem is to catch a Sal Fasano first-base coach sighting.

The following table lists every pitcher who appeared in the game, in order of appearance. I’ll tackle them one by one, offering comps to current major leaguers where applicable, as well as links to videos of similar pitches.

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