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Articles Tagged Front Office 

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11-20

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3

Overthinking It: Baseball's New Kind of Coach
by
Ben Lindbergh

11-20

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1

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 333: How Teams Are Bridging the Gap Between Front Office and Field Staff
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

11-01

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36

Manufactured Runs: Moments of Transition, Moments of Revelation
by
Colin Wyers

08-29

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 31: Davey Johnson, How Much Managers Matter, and the Ideal GM-Manager Relationship
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

03-01

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16

Prospectus Preview: NL Central 2012 Preseason Preview, Part I
by
Stephani Bee and Larry Granillo

02-29

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12

Prospectus Preview: AL West 2012 Preseason Preview
by
Jason Parks and Jason Wojciechowski

01-31

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25

Overthinking It: Managing Expectations: Baseball's Next Big Inefficiency
by
Ben Lindbergh

11-11

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10

Baseball ProGUESTus: The Language of the Hot Stove League
by
Ted Berg

10-12

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9

Manufactured Runs: Curse to Curse
by
Colin Wyers

09-01

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4

Divide and Conquer, AL West: The Deals And The Deal-Makers
by
Joey Matschulat

03-22

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50

Prospectus Hit and Run: I Don't Wanna Go Down to the Basement
by
Jay Jaffe

06-28

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12

Top 10 Week: General Manager Candidates
by
Will Carroll

01-25

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63

Prospectus Roundtable: Analyzing RoboPitcher
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-03

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2

Prospectus Q&A: A.J. Hinch
by
David Laurila

12-06

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Jim Beattie
by
David Laurila

06-18

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0

The Next Ten
by
Will Carroll

09-25

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0

6-4-3: Weighin' in at 19 Stone, Part One of Two
by
Gary Huckabay

04-11

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0

BP Kings Update
by
Ben Murphy

05-11

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Mark Johnson
by
Thomas Gorman

02-23

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Jon Daniels
by
Jonah Keri

04-11

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0

The Daily Prospectus: The Daily Prospectus: The Future
by
Derek Zumsteg

04-11

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0

The Daily Prospectus: The Future
by
Derek Zumsteg

03-29

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0

6-4-3: Road Map
by
Gary Huckabay

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An exercise in thinking theoretically about player value.

The following is an edited transcript of an in-house discussion among the Baseball Prospectus team about a hypothetical pitcher capable of delivering a guaranteed performance.

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The Diamondbacks manager talks about his unorthodox path to managing, playing defense in a hitter's park, and where he'll be ten years from now.

A.J. Hinch isn't your typical big-league manager, but he just might be the perfect fit for an information-driven Diamondbacks organization. Named to the position last May, the 35-year-old Stanford product is well schooled in not only statistical analysis, but also the ins and outs of the D'backs' system, having served as the club's farm director prior to assuming his current role. Hinch talked about his first season on the bench, and the vision he shares with GM Josh Byrnes and the rest of the front office, during MLB's Winter Meetings last month.

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The former general sits down to talk about guiding a cash-strapped team, trading Pedro Martinez, and how much front offices have changed.

Jim Beattie won't be in Indianapolis for this year's Winter Meetings, but the erstwhile Expos and Orioles General Manager knows what goes on behind closed doors when his former brethren convene to talk trade. It was at the meetings 12 years ago that Beattie, then in charge of a financially-strapped Expos franchise, reluctantly laid the groundwork for trading Pedro Martinez to the Red Sox.

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June 18, 2008 12:00 am

The Next Ten

0

Will Carroll

Names you should know, whether you're a Mariners fan or simply curious about who the head honchos of tomorrow might be.

In a post-Moneyball world, a new generation of baseball minds have ascended to the top of their teams. While initial returns have been mixed-Paul DePodesta was forced out of Los Angeles after a perfect storm of weak ownership and a hostile local media conspired against him-the trend is still running strong. That's because like most sports baseball is a game that thrives on imitation; if you win, someone will try to copy your success or at least steal someone that knows the formula. Josh Byrnes got a shot in Arizona because the Red Sox won, even if the second Sox title didn't start a run on the next Sox assistant.

It's time to take a look at the names you'll be hearing next year. While some of these are people who have already been interviewed for positions and might already be on your radar, some of them aren't. I've also taken some of the more easily-anticipated names off of the list. For example, any time there's an opening, Chris Antonetti's name has come up, and for good reason, but after turning down several job offers, Antonetti seems locked in with the Indians, and essentially removes himself from our list, though his name's going to keep coming up whenever a GM job does become available. I also removed former general managers from this list, even though that means keeping well-qualified people like DePodesta off; as with Antonetti, DePodesta will be in circulation as a candidate. This choice also keeps people like Gord Ash, Gerry Hunsicker, or even Pat Gillick off of my list. That's because what I would like to do here is add some names to your mental list. Inside baseball, these guys are known and known well; it's time you did too.

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A conversation with a pair of baseball execs on hiring practices and living the life on the inside.

I recently sat down to talk with two executives, one from an AL club, and one from a NL club. They agreed to the interview only if their identities were protected. Also, in the interests of full disclosure, the executives had final edits of their statements in this two-part interview. To answer the inevitable questions, no, I won't tell you who these guys are, nor are you the only person to email in, either asking for their names, or certain you know who they are.-Gary

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April 11, 2007 12:00 am

BP Kings Update

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Ben Murphy

Everything you wanted to know about the BP Kings Charity Scoresheet Draft.

Peter Gammons' unfortunate incident focused the spotlight on cerebral aneurysms, but my connection is more personal. My mother had a cerebral aneurysm rupture way back in 1977 and was fortunate to survive.

Draft Strategy: Be strong at scarce positions offensively, avoided the dreaded Pitcher-AAA as always, and work on building a better bullpen to compensate for the lack of early starting pitchers. I sort of strayed from that strategy by taking John Lackey relatively early, and I might have a problem at second base if Jose Lopez doesn't pan out. I wanted to build a good core under the age of 30, and I did a fairly decent job of that. One of my harder decisions was my first one--Grady Sizemore vs. Joe Mauer. The consensus seems to be that I went the wrong with Sizemore--the consensus could be right, but I get the idea that three years from now Mauer won't be catching as often, to preserve his knees. Maybe that's too far forward to look, but at the same token, I see Sizemore as basically being risk-free.

I participated in the Mock Draft in the Scoresheet newsgroup, and because of that I expected the draft to be a little more prospect-heavy early-on. With the notable exception of Nate Silver, it wasn't, which suits me fine. I'm happy to have Brignac and Adam Miller among my top prospects.


King Kaufman & Rob Granickback to top
Charity: Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health
Draft Strategy: Our only real strategy was to get big bats with the first few picks, then turn to pitching. Other than that, we basically reacted to the draft. We had the third pick, and in a league with an obvious top three, that made things easy. The one who's left is your guy, and that was Joe Mauer, whom we were happy to have. When Vernon Wells fell, we felt, to us at No. 22, we had our theme for the early part of the draft: Young, studly up-the-middle guys.


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May 11, 2005 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Mark Johnson

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Thomas Gorman

Johnson served as Senior Analyst of Baseball Development for the 2004 NL Champion St. Louis Cardinals. Now back in Silicon Valley, Johnson sat down with BP during a recent San Jose Giants game to discuss his background, his experience with the Cardinals, and where he sees the the most valuable applications of sabermetrics, both now and in the future.

Baseball Prospectus: Could you begin by telling our readers a little bit about your academic background? In the baseball industry it is a bit atypical.

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February 23, 2005 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Jon Daniels

0

Jonah Keri

Prospectus Q&A returns, as Jonah Keri talks to Rangers Assistant General Manager Jon Daniels about the new blood in major league front offices, the challenges of playing in a big hitter's park, and more.

After gaining experience working on draft history, park effects and other studies, the Rangers hired him as Assistant Baseball Operations Director in 2002. Promoted to Director of Baseball Operations when Dan O'Brien left the Rangers to take the Reds' General Manager job, Daniels then ascended to the role of Assistant General Manager last summer, solidifying his status as right-hand man to Rangers GM John Hart. Now one of the youngest AGMs in the game, Daniels' duties include contract negotiations and an array of broader strategic decisions. Daniels recently chatted with Baseball Prospectus about the new blood in major league front offices, the challenges of playing in a big hitter's park, and more.

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April 11, 2002 3:49 pm

The Daily Prospectus: The Daily Prospectus: The Future

0

Derek Zumsteg

There's a new meta-argument I've been seeing a lot in my e-mail lately: if all franchises were run by Billy Beane, or those of his ilk, wouldn't market inequities resurface and make success solely about revenue? The case is made with a resigned air, almost to suggest that maybe it's best if we give up pushing the idea that smart, low-revenue franchises can hold their cards close and still compete with mega-funded teams like the Dodgers. If you look at what the future of enlightened baseball might hold, though, you'll see it's a pretty cool place.

 There's a new meta-argument I've been seeing a lot in my e-mail lately: if all franchises were run by Billy Beane, or those of his ilk, wouldn't market inequities resurface and make success solely about revenue? The case is made with a resigned air, almost to suggest that maybe it's best if we give up pushing the idea that smart, low-revenue franchises can hold their cards close and still compete with mega-funded teams like the Dodgers. If you look at what the future of enlightened baseball might hold, though, you'll see it's a pretty cool place.

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Today, there are organizations that are run incompetently from top to bottom, and others that do okay while openly scoffing at using performance analysis as an evaluation tool. Even if MLB decided tomorrow to clean up its own act--forcing franchise sales, allowing some franchise relocation, helping teams with terrible leases finance or renegotiate, and so on--and we further assume that all teams would be stocked with EnlightenedGM™ clones and front-office staff, it would take five years to turn these organizations into productive, well-oiled machines on the rise. In reality, it's going to take much, much longer, and until those franchises get smarter, they're going to operate at a severe disadvantage in all facets of competition.

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March 29, 2002 12:00 am

6-4-3: Road Map

0

Gary Huckabay

All the quoted text in this piece is from "Puzzle Pieces Fit for Orioles" by Joe Christensen & Baltimore Sun Staff, published on March 27, 2002 at the Baltimore Sun Web site.

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