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Articles Tagged Freedom Of The Press 

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02-07

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5

The BP First Take: Tuesday, February 7
by
Daniel Rathman

11-01

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0

Wezen-Ball: Through the Years: Tony La Russa
by
Larry Granillo

08-19

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23

Manufactured Runs: Multifold Changes
by
Colin Wyers

05-16

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20

Prospectus Hit and Run: Brian Cashman, Loose Cannon
by
Jay Jaffe

09-27

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6

Transaction Action: Dodgers, Padres, Giants
by
Christina Kahrl

07-26

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15

Transaction Action: Hail, hail, the Gang's AL Here
by
Christina Kahrl

05-04

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11

Expanded Horizons: Game Stories
by
Tommy Bennett

06-23

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78

Prospectus Today: Giving Don Fehr His Due
by
Joe Sheehan

11-14

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3

Transaction Analysis: Windy City Double Date
by
Christina Kahrl

04-01

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0

You Could Look It Up: The Anniversary of America
by
Steven Goldman

11-13

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0

Transaction Analysis: NL Pickups and Discards
by
Christina Kahrl

06-06

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0

Transaction of the Day: American League Roundup
by
Christina Kahrl

11-01

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0

Prospectus Today: Off the Field
by
Joe Sheehan

09-22

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0

Prospectus Today: Principles
by
Joe Sheehan

08-24

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0

The Annuity That Changed Baseball
by
Brent Gambill

06-06

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0

Transaction Analysis: June 1-5
by
Christina Kahrl

03-17

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0

Prospectus Today: It's Over
by
Joe Sheehan

08-25

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0

Prospectus Notebook: FLA, KC, MIN
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-15

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0

The Next White Elephant?
by
Neil deMause

06-13

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0

The Week in Quotes: June 6-12
by
John Erhardt

10-14

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0

Under The Knife: The World's Most Famous Ankle
by
Will Carroll

10-01

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0

Transaction Analysis: September 26-29, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

09-22

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0

Transaction Analysis: September 16-19
by
Christina Kahrl

06-26

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0

Transaction Analysis: June 21-24
by
Christina Kahrl

06-23

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0

Transaction Analysis: June 17-20
by
Christina Kahrl

05-25

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0

6-4-3: Leaving the Shore
by
Gary Huckabay

05-25

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0

Breaking Balls: The Program Challenge
by
Derek Zumsteg

09-26

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0

6-4-3: Take it to the Bridge
by
Gary Huckabay

05-20

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0

Breaking Balls: Your Guide to Local Sportswriter Identification
by
Derek Zumsteg

04-25

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0

Under The Knife: Enlightenment
by
Will Carroll

07-19

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0

Transaction Analysis: June 25-July 14, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

07-25

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0

From The Mailbag: Transactions Feedback
by
Baseball Prospectus

06-05

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0

Transaction Analysis: June 1-4
by
Christina Kahrl

01-30

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Transaction Analysis: January 23-29
by
Christina Kahrl

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June 23, 2004 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: June 17-20

0

Christina Kahrl

The White Sox unload Billy Koch. The Rockies' injured outfielders are returning to action. Jose Reyes' return gives the Mets some interesting lineup options. Justin Lehr tries to plug a hole in the Athletics' bullpen. The Cardinals wrestle with a modest catcher surplus. These and other happenings in today's Transaction Analysis.

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I found out about Doug Pappas' tragic passing on Friday. There were phone messages on both my cell phone and home phone from a number of people, all with a more serious tone to their voices than you'd really like to hear. None of the people actually left the momentous news, but rather some version of "Give me a call the second you get this message." Moments later, I checked my e-mail, and a barrage of messages with the header "Sad News" scrolled up my screen. Doug Pappas had passed away. My friend, a colleague for whom I have immense respect, and all-around good guy, had departed from us too soon. My initial response was the same during those horrid times when another friend had died; it sounds strange, but my first impulse is to give him a call and find out what was really going on. It can't be right, you know? This has got to be some sort of misunderstanding, right? Doug's only 43, in good health, and a standup guy. Must be someone else. There's definitely a big ball of confusion out there, and this is completely out of left field. I felt like someone had kicked me in the stomach and stolen the air from the room, but I knew it was a mistake. Had to be. It wasn't. And we are all diminished because of it. Doug's particular chosen role was a particularly difficult one--to call the powerful on the inaccuracy or dishonesty of their public statements. That's not easy. Over the years, Doug came out and publicly pointed out the inaccuracies, contradictions, and misleading nature of Major League Baseball's financial disclosures. He did his homework, explained his position, made sure that the MLB functionary's agenda was understood by the public, and stood by his work. It was an often thankless and misunderstood role, but the public interest was well served because Doug was willing to vigorously undertake it.

Doug Pappas had passed away. My friend, a colleague for whom I have immense respect, and all-around good guy, had departed from us too soon. My initial response was the same during those horrid times when another friend had died; it sounds strange, but my first impulse is to give him a call and find out what was really going on. It can't be right, you know? This has got to be some sort of misunderstanding, right? Doug's only 43, in good health, and a standup guy. Must be someone else. There's definitely a big ball of confusion out there, and this is completely out of left field. I felt like someone had kicked me in the stomach and stolen the air from the room, but I knew it was a mistake. Had to be.

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May 25, 2004 12:00 am

Breaking Balls: The Program Challenge

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Derek Zumsteg

Walking down Occidental to a Mariners game is a great experience. There's the smell of brats on grills, roasted peanuts and kettle corn, the bad music of persistent street musicians and the chatter of fellow fans walking south to the stadium... ...And guys selling programs. Independent programs. Many teams only have one program, the one the team puts out, but in Seattle, we have a choice. I bought both this week to compare, and the results...man, I pity people in cities without competition, if their team-issued programs are anything like this.

...And guys selling programs. Independent programs. Many teams only have one program, the one the team puts out, but in Seattle, we have a choice.

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September 26, 2003 12:00 am

6-4-3: Take it to the Bridge

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Gary Huckabay

Hello Gary! In your chat session, you stated that you thought Keith Woolner's research into replacement level was the most important work in sabermetrics. Why is it so important? I think that your work on PAP is much more important. It can change the way teams handle their pitchers. The pitchers will be healthier, and the teams will be better because of it. Why is replacement level more important than that? --R. J., Baton Rouge, LA First off, let me clarify something. Pitcher Abuse Points was a system developed by Keith Woolner and Rany Jazayerli, not me. And if you review it, you'll find a curve fit that you'll be lucky to find again in your whole life. The answer's pretty straightforward: replacement level is essential to know because it's the only way you can accurately assess marginal value. Let's say you can sign Joe Slugger, who's likely to play a pretty good corner outfield spot and post .280/.360/.550 each year, for $6,000,000 annually. Is that a good deal? There is absolutely no way to tell unless you know what your options are--you need to know the marginal value of that player's production, and for that, you have to know what your replacement options are. Or, put another way, you have to know replacement level.

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Derek Zumsteg chimes in with a handy, dandy guide to identifying your local sportswriter. Not to be taken internally.

The beat writer who long ago decided that it was easier to write up the team-provided game notes, get two, three quotes from players after the game, and make some sausage. Doesn't like his job, resents the players and coaches who make much more money, so he's unwilling to put a hundredth of the effort into his own work. If they ever figured out how to use OCR scanning on the game notes, they'd only have to be at the ballpark in time to pick and load handouts and then attend the post-game interviews.

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April 25, 2003 12:00 am

Under The Knife: Enlightenment

0

Will Carroll

If Dr. Tim Kremchek sends me a bill for the two hours he spent out of surgery today--discussing everything from his love for the game to the ins-and-outs of building a world-class medical facility with everything from an MRI on site to an indoor field where Bill Doran and Tom Browning offer instruction--I'll be more than happy to fork over the cash. (Well, not really, but you know what I mean.) That said, my talk with Dr. Kremchek was really enlightening. There will be a feature coming next week, but I'll say in this forum what I said to Dr. Kremchek today: much of what I've written about him may have been an incorrect interpretation of information. Given the proper context, Kremchek's work can be taken a completely different way without changing the basic facts.

That said, my talk with Dr. Kremchek was really enlightening. There will be a feature coming next week, but I'll say in this forum what I said to Dr. Kremchek today: much of what I've written about him may have been an incorrect interpretation of information. Given the proper context, Kremchek's work can be taken a completely different way without changing the basic facts.

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ANAHEIM ANGELS Placed RHP Al Levine on the 15-day DL (shoulder tendinitis), retroactive to 6/27; recalled RHP John Lackey from Salt Lake. [6/28] I don't disagree with the idea of bringing up John Lackey to move into the rotation. Lackey is the organization's best upper-level prospect, and he's obviously ready to go.

Recalled RHP Matt Wise from Salt Lake; optioned RHP John Lackey to Salt Lake. [6/25]

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Placed RHP Jack McDowell on the 15-day DL (elbow); recalled LHP Jarrod Washburn from Vancouver. [6/1]

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Signed OF Damon Mashore to a minor league contract with a spring training NRI. [1/26]

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