CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Happy Holidays! Regularly Scheduled Articles Will Resume Monday, December 29

Articles Tagged Forbes 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

No Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

No. No they aren't.

It’s that time of year again, when Forbes gives us its estimates of baseball team finances and baseball teams dispute the estimates. This year’s reporting comes with an especially sensational headline:

2013 Houston Astros: Baseball's Worst Team Is The Most Profitable In History

Read the full article...

A critical view of Forbes' team valuations

Full disclosure before I get started: on top of doing my thing here at Baseball Prospectus, I’m a contributor to Forbes SportsMoney. For a guy like me, writing about stuff like this (the business of sports) is, well… it’s a privilege to write for Forbes, one of, if not the, most established business outlets around.

For years, I have been tracking the annual valuations of Major League Baseball clubs that Mike Ozanian started with Financial World, which Kurt Badenhausen now co-authors at Forbes. They’re great as a “trending” measurement, but they have fallen short in terms of real accuracy.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

April 5, 2011 6:20 am

The Payoff Pitch: Probing the Forbes Figures

9

Neil deMause

What the magazine's annual team financial estimates can tell us about the value of a World Series appearance, and the fate of the Dodgers and Mets.

For sports economics geeks, it's a rite of spring right up there with unpopular politicians throwing out first pitches: the annual release of Forbes magazine's baseball team value numbers. The tradition goes back to 1990, when Michael Ozanian first published estimates of MLB teams' finances for Financial World magazine; when Financial World disappeared in a puff of mismanagement in 1998, Ozanian took his spreadsheets to Forbes, where they've appeared ever since.

For years, sports economists treated the Forbes numbers as kind of a business-side equivalent to fielding stats: probably not all that accurate, but worth looking at because, hey, they're all we've got. All of that changed, though, after last summer's Leakgate, in which internal MLB documents leaked to Deadspin revealed the financial details for several MLB teams—and the income numbers matched the Forbes figures almost exactly. All those team execs who'd been complaining that the Forbes figures didn't reflect their actual losses—like the Florida Marlins' David Samson, who griped in 2007 that, "They look at revenue sharing numbers and the team's payroll and take the difference and see profit without looking at our expenses"—were, it turned out, blowing smoke.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

April 11, 2010 10:28 pm

Squawking Baseball: Forbes' 2010 Team Valuations

10

Shawn Hoffman

The magazine's numbers might not always be accurate but are still interesting to peruse.

Ahh, sports business nerds' annual rite of spring: Forbes comes out with its financial estimates for MLB—including franchise valuations, revenue, income, and the like—and MLB says the magazine is totally wrong. Well, after looking a little deeper at them a couple months ago, MLB is probably right; Forbes' valuation numbers haven't been terribly accurate as compared to actual sale prices, and you'd figure revenue and net income numbers would be even harder to guess.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Who do you believe--Forbes Magazine, or the teams that invariably state the numbers are pure fiction? Maury has the details on the finances of major league clubs.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Add Forbes to the ever-growing list of those who don't believe MLB's cries of poverty.

Part One
Part Two
Part Three
Part Four
Part Five
Part Six
Part Seven

Add Forbes to the ever-growing list of those who don't believe MLB's cries of poverty.

The April 15 issue of Forbes contains the magazine's annual survey of MLB's finances. Michael Ozanian has been compiling these surveys since 1991, first for the now-defunct Financial World and since 1998 for Forbes.

Forbes, based on 2001 performance the average Major League Baseball franchise is now worth $286 million, an increase of 10% since 2000. Moreover, the present owners of MLB clubs have seen the value of their investments appreciate an average of 12% a year. These are hardly the hallmarks of an industry in dire financial straits.

While MLB claims operating losses of $232 million in 2001, Forbes estimates that the 30 teams turned a collective profit of $76.7 million. That's a difference of more than $10 million per team.

Here's how the Forbes numbers compare to MLB's (all figures net of revenue sharing payments):







Read the full article...

Add Forbes to the ever-growing list of those who don't believe MLB's cries of poverty.

The April 15 issue of Forbes contains the magazine's annual survey of MLB's finances. Michael Ozanian has been compiling these surveys since 1991, first for the now-defunct Financial World and since 1998 for Forbes. Forbes, based on 2001 performance the average Major League Baseball franchise is now worth $286 million, an increase of 10% since 2000. Moreover, the present owners of MLB clubs have seen the value of their investments appreciate an average of 12% a year. These are hardly the hallmarks of an industry in dire financial straits.

Read the full article...

No Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries