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Articles Tagged First Hit 

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05-13

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7

Minor League Update: Games of May 10-12
by
Zach Mortimer

08-22

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7

Pebble Hunting: The Shame of Your First Big-League Hit
by
Sam Miller

07-17

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2

Value Picks: First, Third, and DH for 7/17/12
by
Michael Street

03-07

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3

The BP Wayback Machine: Don Mincher, Part 2
by
David Laurila

02-14

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24

Future Shock: Boston Red Sox Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-07

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17

The Lineup Card: 11 Times Small Sample Sizes Steered Us Wrong
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-04

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Catch-All
by
Jay Jaffe

01-04

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19

Future Shock: Rockies Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-02

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21

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Outfielders, Part I
by
Jay Jaffe

12-28

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42

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The First Basemen
by
Jay Jaffe

12-21

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36

Spinning Yarn: Hit-and-Run Success is No Accident
by
Mike Fast

12-19

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18

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: Middle Infielders
by
Jay Jaffe

11-22

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30

Spinning Yarn: How Does Quality of Contact Relate to BABIP?
by
Mike Fast

10-26

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40

The Lineup Card: 13 Bad Players Who Are (or Were) Still Fun to Watch and Root For
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-25

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35

World Series Prospectus: Mixed-Up Confusion
by
Jay Jaffe

10-23

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8

World Series Prospectus: Once, Twice, Three Times a Long Ball
by
Jay Jaffe

08-17

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11

Spinning Yarn: Why are Batters Hit by Pitches?
by
Mike Fast

08-04

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6

Spinning Yarn: Counsell for the Defense
by
Mike Fast

08-04

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8

The BP Wayback Machine: Beautiful Theories and Ugly Facts
by
Dan Fox

07-13

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48

The Lineup Card: Cult Favorites: 18 Non-Star Ballplayers Who Should be Better Remembered
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-12

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7

Painting the Black: Mid-season Heroes and Goats, Part 1
by
R.J. Anderson

07-09

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7

One-Hoppers: DJ3K: "I Don't Think You Can Script It Any Better"
by
Jay Jaffe

07-08

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1

Prospectus Hit and Run: Chasing the Chase
by
Jay Jaffe

07-07

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45

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: Third Basemen
by
Jason Parks

06-28

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54

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: Shortstops
by
Jason Parks

06-21

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39

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Positional Primacy: First Base
by
Jason Parks

05-31

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1

Prospectus Hit List: NL: The Valdez Non-Disaster
by
Jay Jaffe

05-02

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6

Prospectus Hit and Run: Bautista's Enduring Young Charms
by
Jay Jaffe

04-01

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22

Prospectus Hit and Run: Off to the Races
by
Jay Jaffe

03-04

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54

The BP Broadside: The Most Disappointing Prospects of All Time, Part 3
by
Steven Goldman

03-01

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91

The BP Broadside: The Most Disappointing Prospects of All Time, Part 2
by
Steven Goldman

02-16

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38

Future Shock: Minnesota Twins Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-07

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21

Future Shock: Cincinnati Reds Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

02-01

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22

Future Shock: San Diego Padres Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-25

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17

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Vortices of Suck
by
Jay Jaffe

01-12

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6

Prospectus Q&A: Don Mincher, Part II
by
David Laurila

01-11

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41

Future Shock: Oakland Athletics Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

01-04

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7

Prospectus Hit and Run: Class of 2011: The Right Fielders
by
Jay Jaffe

12-23

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2011: Bagwell and Baggage
by
Jay Jaffe

11-03

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14

World Series Prospectus: Series Notebook
by
Jay Jaffe

10-28

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3

Prospectus Perspective: The Young-Huff All-Stars, Part I
by
Steven Goldman

10-27

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16

World Series Prospectus: Fall Classic Memories
by
Baseball Prospectus

10-06

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46

Prospectus Hit List: The Finale
by
Jay Jaffe

09-16

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1

Prospectus Hit List: NL: Do The Tighten Up
by
Jay Jaffe

08-29

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2

Between The Numbers: The PITCHf/x Summit Quasi-Liveblog
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-27

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Peter Bourjos
by
David Laurila

08-13

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8

Prospectus Q&A: On Trammell and Whitaker
by
David Laurila

06-04

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7

You Can Blog It Up: DPOTD: The Worst Exchange of First Basemen Ever
by
Steven Goldman

04-13

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7

You Can Blog It Up: Dead Player of the Day #12
by
Steven Goldman

04-04

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Buck Showalter
by
David Laurila

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Mike continues his investigation of HITf/x data to glean more insights into whether pitchers can prevent hits on balls in play.

In the first part of this study, I used detailed batted ball speed information from HITf/x to examine the degree of skill that batters and pitchers had in quality of contact made or allowed. Here, I will look deeper into the question of why some batted balls fall for hits and others do not.

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Despite being terrible at baseball, these players are (or were) enjoyable to watch

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October 25, 2011 5:15 am

World Series Prospectus: Mixed-Up Confusion

35

Jay Jaffe

A series of questionable moves, bloopers, and blown calls to the bullpen were pertinent in the outcome of Game Five.

Given not only his history but the clinic in bullpen management that Tony La Russa put on in the NLCS, it’s difficult to believe that he could wind up botching a situation as badly as he did in the eighth inning of Monday's Game Five of the World Series. But thanks to a miscommunication between the Cardinals' dugout and their bullpen, a manager who has spent his career chasing the platoon advantage ad nauseam was left with lefty Marc Rzepczynski facing righty Mike Napoli with the bases loaded and one out. Meanwhile, the pitcher he wanted to face the Rangers' best hitter at the game’s pivotal moment wasn't even warmed up. Napoli, whose three-run homer had broken the game open the night before, pounded a double off the right-center field wall, breaking a 2-2 tie and helping the Rangers take a 3-2 lead in the Series.

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October 23, 2011 1:15 pm

World Series Prospectus: Once, Twice, Three Times a Long Ball

8

Jay Jaffe

Albert Pujols makes history in the process of putting the Cardinals up 2-1.

"When you have the bat in your hand, you can always change the story," said Reggie Jackson years ago. Mired in the controversy regarding a post-Game Two no-show following his ninth-inning relay flub, Albert Pujols changed the story on Saturday night, becoming just the third player ever to hit three home runs in a World Series game and collecting five hits en route to a Series-record 14 total bases. Before hitting his first home run, Pujols had already collected two hits while helping the Cardinals build an 8-6 lead; his three-run, sixth-inning homer off Alexi Ogando broke the game open en route to a 16-7 rout and a 2-1 Series lead. The Cardinals' 16 runs tied the 2002 Giants and 1960 Yankees for the second-highest single-game total in Series history.

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What factors determine how often hitters take one for the team?

Every season major league pitchers throw tens of thousands of pitches inside off the plate, yet they hit batters “only” about 1500-1800 times in a season. Why do some inside pitches hit the batter, while others do not?

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August 4, 2011 9:00 am

Spinning Yarn: Counsell for the Defense

6

Mike Fast

Dissecting Craig Counsell's 45-at-bat hitless streak

Craig Counsell has been in a bit of a slump lately. Okay, maybe that undersells it a little. Counsell is 0 for his last 45 at-bats. His last hit came a couple months back, on June 10. Another hitless at-bat will tie him with Bill Bergen of the 1909 Brooklyn Superbas for the longest known streak of hitless at-bats by a position player.

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Revisiting historical HBP rates in the wake of Alex Avila's plunking by Jered Weaver's hand.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

As Jered Weaver prepares to serve his six-game suspension, take in some trends in HBP rates over time, which originally ran as a "Schrodinger's Bat" column on May 4, 2006.

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In the first in a new series of weekly lists, the BP team compiles its nominees for most under-appreciated ballplayers of their times.

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Reviewing the best and worst first-half position players on each team.

In the numerical sense, the halfway point of the season arrived about a week ago. However, the All-Star break marks the arbitrary end point of the first half, bringing a few days of festivities and vacations to the forefront. That period of inactivity in games that matter offers a window into the frozen stats for each team, allowing us to see who is leading the charge and who is failing the team so far. 

In order to determine who’s been naughty and who’s been nice, I’ll enlist the aid of the Wins Above Replacement metric. Next time, we’ll cover the pitchers, but for today, it’s all about the position players.

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Derek Jeter didn't just inch past the 3,000 hit mark, he blazed through it with a memorable afternoon.

"I don't think you can script it any better. This is already movie-ready." — Joe Girardi, Yankees manager

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July 8, 2011 10:46 am

Prospectus Hit and Run: Chasing the Chase

1

Jay Jaffe

Jay looks at Derek Jeter's struggles trying to reach 3,000 hits and the corresponding struggles of his team last night.

It's not easy being Derek Jeter. Fresh off his 37th birthday, he is simultaneously on the precipice of making history—the first player to attain 3,000 hits as a Yankee, the 11th player to do so with a single team, and the 28th player to do so, period—and of being written off. Mere months after signing a three-year, $51 million deal (plus a player option) following a stretch of contentious negotiations, he is in the throes of the worst season of his 17-year career, his contract even more obviously an albatross than it appeared when he signed it. For a player who has always downplayed personal accomplishments in favor of team success, this is an uncomfortable time.

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Just because many third basemen are failed shortstops does not mean there isn't an abundant supply of talent at the hot corner.

Leader of the Pack (Present): Anthony Rendon (Nationals)
The case for: Even though he has yet to play a professional game, Rendon’s combination of tools and polish make him the face of the position. At the plate, the native Texan (another plus attribute) is able to generate tremendous bat speed; his hands and hips work at near elite levels, and his raw strength is above average. Rendon’s hit tool projects to be plus-plus (70 grade)—which should allow him to become a perennial .300 hitter—with the overall approach to work counts, set up favorable hitting counts, and reach base at a high clip. His power potential ranges from average to plus, with a swing that some believe is better suited for gap-to-gap power, rather than a swing with the necessary loft and backspin to produce 25-plus homers per season without selling out his approach.

In the field, Rendon projects as an above-average defender at third, with both the leather and arm grading out as plus tools, and the instincts necessary to bring the physical package together. Speed isn’t a part of Rendon’s game, but his feet aren’t heavy, and he shows good first-step quickness and reactions. Despite not being a physical force, Rendon has all the attributes necessary to become an All-Star talent at the hot corner, with the ability to hit for average, reach base, hit for some power, and play above-average defense. It remains to be seen if Rendon ends up at third base for the Nationals, but that’s a byproduct of organizational depth, not a developmental deficiency in Rendon’s skill set.


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