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Articles Tagged Fielding 

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11-26

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37

Pebble Hunting: Extrapolating the Breakdown of Traditional Defense
by
Sam Miller

11-25

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38

Baseball Therapy: The Corner-Outfield Inefficiency
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-04

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10

Baseball Therapy: What Do Fielders and Homecoming Queens Have in Common?
by
Russell A. Carleton

09-16

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2

BP Unfiltered: Carlos Gomez Hates Homers, and Other 2013 Exploits in Individual Defense
by
Ben Lindbergh

07-15

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12

Baseball Therapy: I Thought He Was Gonna Get It
by
Russell A. Carleton

06-18

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4

Baseball Therapy: Is There a Pinch-Fielding Penalty?
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-14

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17

Baseball Therapy: How Reliable Are Our Fielding Metrics?
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-14

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51

Manufactured Runs: Listen to What the Heyman Said
by
Colin Wyers

01-02

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2

Pebble Hunting: The Non-Pitching Value of Pitchers
by
Sam Miller

07-18

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9

Manufactured Runs: Getting Shifty Again
by
Colin Wyers

07-13

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14

The Stats Go Marching In: Catching Up with Catcher Rankings
by
Max Marchi

06-08

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: Taking a Step Back, Part Two
by
Kevin Goldstein

05-30

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10

Manufactured Runs: Who Gives a Shift?
by
Colin Wyers

04-19

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19

Between The Numbers: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Outfield
by
Colin Wyers

04-17

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8

Baseball ProGUESTus: Giving Difficult Plays Their Due
by
Jon Bruschke

11-23

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25

Checking the Numbers: Fielding Distrust
by
Eric Seidman

07-13

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16

Checking the Numbers: Five Things I Learned at the PITCHf/x Summit
by
Eric Seidman

07-10

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18

Midseason Review
by
Eric Seidman

06-21

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62

Prospectus Idol Entry: Are Offensive Shortstops Becoming Toxic Sub-Prime Mortgages and Other Evolutionary Trends in Baseball Positions
by
Tim Kniker

12-06

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: Defense and Alphabet Soup
by
Dan Fox

10-16

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0

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten-Pack
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-16

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0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

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0

Future Shock: Where Did the Tigers and the Athletics Come From?
by
Kevin Goldstein

10-14

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0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-14

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0

Playoff Prospectus: The Best and Worst of Mets and Cardinals Postseason Pitching
by
Jim Baker

10-13

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0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

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0

Prospectus Today: The Games Go On
by
Joe Sheehan

10-12

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0

Player Profile
by
Marc Normandin

10-11

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0

Remembering Buck O'Neil
by
Alex Belth

10-11

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0

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day One
by
Joe Sheehan

10-09

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0

Completely Random Statistical Trivia
by
Keith Woolner

10-09

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0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Six
by
Joe Sheehan

10-07

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0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Four
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

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0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Three
by
Joe Sheehan

10-06

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0

Prospectus Matchups: October Musings
by
Jim Baker

10-05

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0

Prospectus Today: Division Series, Day Two
by
Joe Sheehan

03-07

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0

Breaking Balls: Getting Defensive: Advanced Concepts
by
Derek Zumsteg

03-04

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0

Breaking Balls: Getting Defensive: The Basics
by
Derek Zumsteg

10-12

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0

Call It In The Air!
by
Dave Pease

03-12

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0

Shortstops and DFTs
by
Clay Davenport

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November 26, 2013 6:00 am

Pebble Hunting: Extrapolating the Breakdown of Traditional Defense

37

Sam Miller

Infield shifts are just the beginning.

One of the most interesting things about extreme infield shifts is how unextreme they are. They are like some lame grownup’s idea of extreme, a little bit of flash and inconvenience but ultimately very safe. The shift was invented by sane people. Real extreme comes from insanity, and it makes us deeply uncomfortable.

Everybody’s talking about the football coach who never punts​—4th and 15 at his own five-yard line, he’s going for it. That’s fearless. It’s hard to think of a baseball equivalent, one that would work or even one that might work. Russell Carleton this week explored the listener-suggested idea of having the left and right fielders swap, depending on batter handedness, to make sure the better defender gets more attempts to field the ball. The gory math supports the use of the relatively conservative proposal, but Carleton concludes what we can't help but conclude:

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Are teams passing up an advantage by not telling their corner outfielders to trade places based on the batter?

On Friday’s episode of Effectively Wild, listener Matt Trueblood emailed the show to ask Ben and Sam a fascinating question. Why is it that teams do not have their left and right fielders switch places more often, particularly if one of them is a better fielder than the other? We know that some players like to pull the ball, while others like to hit to the opposite field. Why not put the better fielder in the place where it’s more likely that the ball will be hit? It’s a fascinating question because there is no rule that prohibits it from happening. In the era of the infield shift, why hasn’t anyone tried this?

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An open letter in response to Murray Chass' recent rant about fielding metrics and the Gold Gloves.

Mr. Chass:

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Carlos Gomez is a prolific home run thief, but he might not be the only fielder having a special defensive season.

Carlos Gomez hates homers. Allowing them, that is. Gomez took a homer away from Jay Bruce on Sunday, which gave him five home run robberies on the season, according to Baseball Info Solutions. That's the most they've recorded for any fielder in a single season in the 10 years that they've been keeping track. I've collected all five here:

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July 15, 2013 5:00 am

Baseball Therapy: I Thought He Was Gonna Get It

12

Russell A. Carleton

Does a good fielder make the fielders around him better or worse?

Ozzie Smith is widely regarded as the best defensive shortstop (and somewhat by extension, the best defensive player) of his era. Anything that was hit into that no-man's land between second and third was gobbled up by the Wizard. In a game that adores offensive numbers, there was something so special about Ozzie's glovework that he ended up in the Hall of Fame despite a career .262/.337/.328 triple slash line.

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June 18, 2013 6:00 am

Baseball Therapy: Is There a Pinch-Fielding Penalty?

4

Russell A. Carleton

Do substitute defenders perform worse in the field than starters?

I have a fascination with super-utility players, the guys who can play anywhere on the diamond. Players like Tony Phillips, Ben Zobrist, or even Denny Hocking. They're so handy to have around because a manager can fill out a lineup with a little more flexibility and know that he has someone to fill whatever hole is left. He's a wild card that gives a general manager more choices when putting together a roster. He's the type of player who adds a little extra value that the box score— and WARP—don't really capture.

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How long fielding stats take to stabilize.

A little more than a week ago, Jon Heyman of CBS sent out a tweet wondering why it was that Starling Marte and Bryce Harper had the same WAR. Heyman was quoting Baseball-Reference's version of WAR, which at that moment in time showed Marte and Harper tied at 1.7 wins. Harper had clearly been the superior hitter, but drilling down, it turned out that the fielding metric used by Baseball-Reference loved Marte's defense enough (and thought Harper's was average enough) to call them equals.

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Why Jon Heyman's questions about WAR are worth asking, and answering.

As that old pop song goes, “oops, he did it again.” Sports Illustrated’s Jon Heyman is asking questions about WAR:

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Is it worth paying certain pitchers more for what they do when they're not on the mound?

I was talking to a friend the other day who pointed out that, had Johnny Cueto not been knocked out in the first game, and had not Mike Leake been the Reds' uninspiring only option to replace him, the Giants probably wouldn’t have won the NLDS or, consequently, the World Series. That seems reasonable:

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July 18, 2012 5:00 am

Manufactured Runs: Getting Shifty Again

9

Colin Wyers

BIS addressed one problem with their defensive metric that was making Brett Lawrie look better than he is.

A while back, you may recall, I wrote an article about Brett Lawrie’s rating in one defensive metric, Baseball Info Solution’s Defensive Runs Saved. My conclusion:

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Max crunches the numbers and comes up with the top 10 catchers of the 2012 season based on overall value both at and behind the plate.

The season has reached its midpoint, so this seems like a good time to take a look at some rankings. I debuted here at Baseball Prospectus with a series on evaluating catchers defense, so catchers are the subject of the top-10 list that follows.

The catchers will be listed with four numbers beside their names. The first three cover batting, baserunning, and defense. The fourth is the sum of the numbers pertaining to each of those areas.

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Bone up on the basics of scouting with a primer on evaluating a prospect's running, fielding, and throwing ability.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

Revisit the second part of Kevin's scouting vocabulary primer, which covered the qualities that are evaluated when a scout looks at a prospect's running, fielding, and throwing abilities. The piece was originally published as a Future Shock column on March 15, 2006.

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