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Articles Tagged Fernando Rodney 

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04-22

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9

Closer to Me: Week Four
by
Mauricio Rubio

04-01

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22

Closer to Me: Week One
by
Mauricio Rubio

03-07

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9

Fantasy Players to Avoid: Relief Pitchers
by
BP Fantasy Staff

02-06

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4

Rumor Roundup: Examining the Market
by
Daniel Rathman

12-26

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2

Rumor Roundup: Tanaka Time
by
Daniel Rathman

06-27

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13

Bullpen Report: Stuck in the Middle
by
Mike Gianella

05-30

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3

Bullpen Report: Movin' on Up
by
Mike Gianella

05-23

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7

Bullpen Report: Introducing Tiers
by
Mike Gianella

05-16

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5

Bullpen Report: Diamondbacks Settle on Bell
by
Mike Gianella

05-08

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2

Fantasy Freestyle: Fernando Rodney: Tapped Out?
by
Jason Collette

03-18

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4

Painting the Black: Occam's Rubber, Part II
by
R.J. Anderson

10-02

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2

BP Unfiltered: The Third-Best ERA in History
by
Sam Miller

05-16

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28

Overthinking It: Brett Lawrie Was Framed
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-14

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7

Resident Fantasy Genius: A Bad Month to Be, Or Own, a Closer
by
Derek Carty

04-30

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10

Pebble Hunting: Jordan Walden and Small Samples
by
Sam Miller

04-21

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0

Inside The Park Blog: Bullpen Woes
by
Jason Collette

04-13

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31

Pebble Hunting: The Best Pitches Thrown This Week
by
Sam Miller

04-11

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6

BP Unfiltered: The Fernando Rodney Shift
by
R.J. Anderson

01-05

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9

Transaction Analysis: A Trio of Signings
by
R.J. Anderson

04-07

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5

Manufactured Runs: The Closer Quandary
by
Colin Wyers

04-05

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0

Fantasy Beat: Walden In, Rodney Out in Anaheim
by
Marc Normandin

06-17

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12

Fantasy Beat: Hot Spots: Relief Pitchers
by
Mike Petriello

06-10

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1

Fantasy Beat: Hot Spots: Relief Pitchers
by
Mike Petriello

04-22

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1

Fantasy Beat: Hot Spots: Relief Pitchers
by
Mike Petriello

04-15

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10

Fantasy Beat: Hot Spots: Relief
by
Mike Petriello

01-20

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7

On the Beat: Midweek Update
by
John Perrotto

01-07

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23

Transaction Action: AL Re-Gifting
by
Christina Kahrl

10-08

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16

Kiss'Em Goodbye: Detroit Tigers
by
Baseball Prospectus

03-17

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0

Team Health Reports: Detroit Tigers
by
Will Carroll

10-27

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0

World Series Prospectus: Game Four Diary
by
Christina Kahrl

10-27

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0

Prospectus Today: Game Four
by
Joe Sheehan

03-04

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0

Prospectus Triple Play: Anaheim Angels, Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers
by
Baseball Prospectus

06-25

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0

Transaction Analysis: June 16-22, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

05-13

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0

Transaction Analysis: April 30-May 11, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

07-03

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0

Touring the Minors
by
Keith Scherer

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May 16, 2012 9:22 am

Overthinking It: Brett Lawrie Was Framed

28

Ben Lindbergh

Brett Lawrie was right to be upset about the two strikes that got him ejected on Tuesday, but framer extraordinaire Jose Molina had as much to do with the calls as umpire Bill Miller.

On Tuesday night, the Rays beat the Blue Jays 4-3. All of the scoring was over by the seventh, but the real action occurred in the bottom of the ninth, when Brett Lawrie was ejected by umpire Bill Miller after arguing balls and strikes, first with loud body language, then with loud words, and finally by transforming his helmet into flying suspension bait. Lawrie probably brushes his teeth more intensely than you’ve ever done anything, so you can only imagine what he looks like when he’s called out on borderline pitches in a close game against a division rival. Actually, that’s not true—imagining it isn’t the only thing you can do. You can also watch this video:

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May 14, 2012 3:18 am

Resident Fantasy Genius: A Bad Month to Be, Or Own, a Closer

7

Derek Carty

Don't overreact to an unprecedented casualty rate for closers.

There’s an old adage in fantasy baseball to “draft skills, not roles.”  The reasoning behind this is that the cream will rise to the top, that the better player will eventually take on the more prominent role.  This advice is often given in regard to closers, but it’s advice which I’ve expressed my disagreement with on multiple occasions.  While “draft skills, not roles” is a romantic notion, studies I’ve run in the past have shown that role is far more important than skill when it comes to saves and that closers in waiting are generally poor investments.

When Fernando Rodney received the first two save opportunities following Kyle Farnsworth’s injury, one site said that “while it would be nice to think that the 35-year-old will continue to close out games so effortlessly, his track record and bullpen competition probably make him one of the biggest sell-high candidates in baseball.”  Rodney proceeded to roll off seven more (consecutive) saves en route to becoming one of the most valuable closers in baseball over the first six weeks.  He had the role, which is more difficult to lose than most assume.

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April 30, 2012 3:00 am

Pebble Hunting: Jordan Walden and Small Samples

10

Sam Miller

What numbers do we look at when no number is large enough?

In 2011, the Angels began the season with Fernando Rodney as their closer. Oh, man, was Fernando Rodney bad at baseball a year ago. Rodney was the Angels’ closer, and he was also one of the worst relievers in baseball. He converted his first save, and he blew his second save, and he was replaced by Jordan Walden. Jordan Walden made the All-Star team. The Angels didn’t add a closer in the offseason. The Angels didn’t suggest any sort of closer controversy was brewing. The Angels didn't leave the issue of the ninth inning open-ended at all. Jordan Walden spent his winter chopping wood, shoveling snow, and quietly being the Angels’ closer. “What do you do?” people would ask him at parties. “Awwwww,” he would say, trying to be humble, because nobody likes a boaster, “I’m involved in recreation.” Pressed, he would acknowledge that he closed baseball games for the Angels. Women would casually touch his arm.

He saved his first game, and he blew his second game, and he was replaced by Scott Downs. Fernando Rodney is a closer, and Jordan Walden no longer is. That was very fast! One blown save. Four and a third total innings, and nine baserunners. If his season were a start, it would be Clayton Kershaw’s April 15 start. Very, very fast.

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The Rays' bullpen, to put it kindly, is off to a rough start on paper. What is wrong with what was a perceived strength of the club coming into the season?

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Presenting the three filthiest pitches from the first week of the season.

If you followed any games last season on MLB.com’s Gameday application, you saw “Nasty Factor,” which assigned a number to each pitch based on its perceived nastiness. If you have followed any games this season on Gameday, you’ve seen “Scout,” which describes the action like this: “Sergio Romo is having trouble locating his four-seam fastball” and so on. We’re about to watch the three best pitches* thrown in the first week of the season, and, frankly, Nasty Factor and Scout can’t do these pitches justice. So enjoy the moving pictures, and then read the expert analysis provided by some MLB.com apps that are still in development.

3. Fernando Rodney’s 2-1 fastball to Russell Martin, April 6.

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The Rays are known for their shifts, but not like this.

Kyle Farnsworth’s elbow discomfort not only landed him on the disabled list, but opened up one of the game’s more interesting early season position battles. Under normal circumstances, Joe Maddon would not have to choose between Fernando Rodney and Joel Peralta to close out games, yet here he is, doing just that on a day-to-day basis. So far, Rodney looks to be the leader, having notched three saves in three opportunities—two due to Peralta’s ineffectiveness. The most recent came on Wednesday, with Rodney tossing a one-two-three inning after the Rays came back in the ninth inning.

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January 5, 2012 9:00 am

Transaction Analysis: A Trio of Signings

9

R.J. Anderson

The A's bring back Coco Crisp, the Marlins re-sign Greg Dobbs, and the Rays add Fernando Rodney to their bullpen.

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April 7, 2011 12:00 pm

Manufactured Runs: The Closer Quandary

5

Colin Wyers

Will a recent change in closers have any impact on the Angels, or is the order of late-inning outings immaterial?

As the season began, Fernando Rodney’s hold on the Angels’ closer job was believed to be tenuous. Other than possessing the “proven closer” label, there wasn’t much about Rodney to recommend him for the role. His “success” as a closer, such as it was, was more a testament to how overrated the role is, not his own ability to pitch.

Despite those concerns, few would have expected him to surrender the title as early as he did: Rodney was removed from the closer role on Tuesday, after just two outings and one blown save. What was it about the one-and-a-third innings Rodney had pitched so far this year that wasn’t already apparent from the previous 398 innings under his belt? Sure, the most recent innings were worse, but anyone can pitch that poorly in less than two innings. A more impressive sign of mediocrity is being able to pitch a hairsbreadth away from replacement level for eight seasons, which Rodney had already accomplished.

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April 5, 2011 5:35 pm

Fantasy Beat: Walden In, Rodney Out in Anaheim

0

Marc Normandin

Mike Scioscia has had enough with Fernando Rodney, which means the closer gig is Jordan Walden's now.

Fernando Rodney is out, and Jordan Walden is in. Angels' manager Mike Scioscia made the call this afternoon, announcing that Rodney would not close games for the Halos. Walden has struck out five hitters in his 2 1/3 innings pitched this year, while Rodney has given up a pair of runs and struck out two over his 1 1/3 frames.

Granted, we're talking about extremely small samples here, but, given the rush of Scioscia to replace Rodney just four games into the season, it's safe to say he was looking for an excuse to remove him from the gig. Rodney was a questionable closer to begin with—we're talking about a pitcher who has punched out just 7.1 per nine over the past two years, and against 4.8 walks per nine. He's not exactly contributing to your strikeout rates, WHIP, or, thanks to his 4.41 mark from 2007 through 2010, your ERA, either. If anything, it's a relief to have someone like him, whose lone value came from saves, removed from your lineup.

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June 17, 2010 8:39 am

Fantasy Beat: Hot Spots: Relief Pitchers

12

Mike Petriello

There's value in even the worst of situations, if you know where to look for it.

Sometimes, I wonder why I even bother discussing the Orioles in this section. As Rob Neyer noted, the 2010 edition of this once-proud franchise has the same record through 66 games as the 1988 crew, who started 0-21 and finished up at 54-107. They've gone through about twenty closers, to the point that I wonder when Armando Benitez is going to surface, and that means that each week it seems to be someone new. This week, I'm going to hedge my bets and have two Oriole relievers on the list.

As expected, Alfredo Simon was activated from the disabled list and made his debut yesterday in a non-save situation, with the Orioles insisting all along that he'd be eased back into the to the closer's role upon his return. Nothing has caused us to think they'd deviate that plan, so Simon remains on the list. Yet with the Orioles being the Orioles, they could be forgiven for jumping at the first sign of life from anyone on the roster, and that's why we're adding David Hernandez this week as well. Hernandez wouldn't seem like a prime candidate for success, since the reason he's in the bullpen in the first place is that he lost his starting job after eight lousy starts in which he put up a 5.31 ERA and walked more (28) than he struck out (27). Yet he's allowed just one run in 8.2 relief innings since being converted, flashing his 93 MPH fastball and increasing his K rate from 5.7 as a starter to 7.3 as a reliever. He's picked up two saves, as well. While I still think Simon will get a chance to reclaim his job, it's not like he was that good, with a dangerously high walk rate. To be honest, I'd be surprised if either one of them claimed the job, with this looking very much like a "hot hand" situation for the few save opportunities the O's find themselves in. Keep an eye on this over the next few days to see how they play this, but gun to my head, I like Hernandez right now.

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June 10, 2010 9:47 am

Fantasy Beat: Hot Spots: Relief Pitchers

1

Mike Petriello

It's time to look backwards in order to get value going forward.

Weird week here at the relievers outpost of Value Picks. As you can tell from the comments in last week's article, I'd expected that we'd be talking about possible closer changes in Houston and Washington, with Matt Lindstrom and Matt Capps having each blown three saves in four outings. Yet since then, Lindstrom's been perfect in converting three saves, and Capps has converted his chances as well, holding off the wolves at least for this week. Plus, two of the other teams we've been talking about - Toronto and Baltimore - haven't even been able to get far enough in games to have save opportunities. So as far as save-chasing goes this week, it's kind of a lean group, and with that in mind we're looking back at past values which could pay off in the near future.

We're welcoming back two previous Value Picks this week in Alfredo Simon and Fernando Rodney. Simon was one of the more successful value picks of the season, as he went from being a minor-league afterthought in April to converting six of seven save opportunities in May before being injured - a nice treat for savvy fantasy owners who were able to wring easy value out of him. Since he's been gone, the Orioles have been even more of a disaster than they were before, and though Will Ohman's been the nominal closer for over two weeks now, he hasn't notched a single save. Much of that is his fault, but not in the way you think. Yes, he blew the only save opportunity he was presented with (though he allowed just one run while doing so), but since he was forced into the 9th inning, the replacements the Orioles have tried in Ohman's old spot have failed miserably, leading to Ohman getting just one chance to actually close a game.

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April 22, 2010 8:33 am

Fantasy Beat: Hot Spots: Relief Pitchers

1

Mike Petriello

Mike Petriello looks at practically free closer-in-waiting, along with other relief values.

As you may have seen from the other Hot Spots pieces this week, our Value Picks list is going to be somewhat of a living document, with players added (in green) and dropped (in yellow) as circumstances require. So for this week, we start by waving goodbye to Fernando Rodney and Ramon Troncoso, though for very different reasons. Rodney's actually been very effective for the Angels, ranking second in the AL in saves while filling in for Brian Fuentes. That said, Rodney is no longer a secret (a full quarter of ESPN teams picked him up in the last week alone) and Fuentes is now back to reclaim his closer duties. Fuentes is hardly the most reliable guy around (he blew a lead in his first game back), so Rodney will probably still get his chances, but he no longer fits on this list. Staying in Los Angeles, Ramon Troncoso merited notice last week since the tattered Dodger bullpen and Joe Torre's misuse of Jonathan Broxton put him into position to steal some save opportunities. With George Sherrill seemingly turning it around and Hong-Chih Kuo & Ronald Belisario each returning to the active roster this week, the small fantasy value Troncoso may have had is gone.

As for who's joining us this week, well, I guess I can't get as lucky as I did last week, when we had two closer injuries and two closer demotions, can I? So today we're looking deeper, and by "deeper", I mean "two guys who are owned in less than 1% of ESPN leagues." Let's start with Juan Gutierrez of Arizona, where the drumbeats started pounding when Chad Qualls allowed runs in 4 of his first 6 games, including back-to-back blown saves against the Dodgers. Remember, this isn't just a fickle fanbase reacting to a bad week, because we have some history here: Qualls is coming back from a dislocated kneecap which ended his 2009 and required surgery, and we've already seen Gutierrez succeed in the role. Tapped as the Arizona closer for the final month after Qualls went down, Gutierrez sparkled in accumulating 8 saves and a win in 12 games through the end of the season - allowing just a .528 OPS in that time. So when you've got a veteran coming off a serious injury who gets off to a bad start, and there's a 26-year-old behind him with a nice track record and heat that averages 95 mph, it doesn't take much to get the controversy growing.

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