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Articles Tagged Felix Hernandez 

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04-02

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11

Pebble Hunting: Bonds vs. Pedro, and More Fun with Batter-Pitcher Matchups
by
Sam Miller

03-31

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3

Pebble Hunting: Mike Trout vs. Felix Hernandez
by
Sam Miller

03-31

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2

My Model Portfolio: Two Aces
by
Doug Thorburn

03-27

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2

My Model Portfolio: The Wright Guys
by
Alex Kantecki

02-27

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34

Dynasty League Positional Rankings: Top 175 Starting Pitchers
by
Bret Sayre

02-27

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31

Fantasy Three-Year Projections: Starting Pitchers
by
Paul Sporer

02-24

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10

State of the Position: Starting Pitchers
by
Mike Gianella

09-20

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10

Pebble Hunting: Attacking Andrew McCutchen
by
Sam Miller

08-29

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2

What You Need to Know: An Ugly Outing for Felix
by
Daniel Rathman

08-27

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0

TINSTAAPP: TINSTAAPP Episode 13: Hernandez vs. Perez
by
Paul Sporer and Doug Thorburn

08-19

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0

TINSTAAPP: TINSTAAPP Episode 12: Mejia vs. Nolasco
by
Paul Sporer and Doug Thorburn

07-17

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1

Pitcher Profile: Speeding Up at the Break
by
Harry Pavlidis

07-01

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1

Pebble Hunting: Felix Hernandez, Lance Lynn, and a Peripherals Paradox
by
Sam Miller

06-07

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10

Five to Watch: Checking in on the Holy Trinity
by
Bret Sayre

02-08

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21

Transaction Analysis: Seattle Royale
by
R.J. Anderson

01-04

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4

Raising Aces: Then and Now: It's Good to Be the King
by
Doug Thorburn

08-24

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 28: Austin Jackson and Debating Defense/What Does the Mariners' Winning Streak Mean?
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-17

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0

BP Unfiltered: The King of All Wild Things
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-16

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3

The Prospectus Hit List: Thursday, August 16
by
Matthew Kory

08-16

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2

BP Unfiltered: Forever Young
by
Sam Miller

08-04

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2

BP Unfiltered: Efficient Felix
by
Ben Lindbergh

08-02

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39

The Process: The Mariners' Missed Opportunity
by
Bradley Ankrom

07-03

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5

Western Front: Ready, Set, No!
by
Geoff Young

05-22

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6

BP Unfiltered: Google Bio Pictures and Baseball
by
Sam Miller

05-22

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7

The Prospectus Hit List: Tuesday, May 22
by
Matthew Kory

04-04

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23

Raising Aces: Pitchology 101
by
Doug Thorburn

03-31

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42

Pre-Season Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

06-14

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: The Science and Art of Building a Better Pitcher Profile
by
Dan Fox

05-25

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Is it Still Good to Be the King?
by
Nate Silver

03-20

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0

2006--Setting the Stage
by
Jonah Keri

08-15

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0

Prospectus Today: The King?
by
Joe Sheehan

08-10

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Prospectus Game of the Week: King Felix Arrives
by
Jonah Keri

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How pitchers can throw more pitches inside the strike zone and walk more batters (and vice versa).

I remember once that there was an article (not written by me, but it might as well have been; I’ve certainly written a version of this article before) that looked at a batter’s increased walk rate and concluded that it was due to... not swinging at as many pitches outside the strike zone. Colin Wyers tweeted something in response that went something like, but not exactly like, this: “uh no doy.” I try to keep that tweet (or at least something like that tweet) in mind, because it’s easy to find explanations that are already embedded in that which you seek to explain. Baseball generally obeys its own physics. Player is struggling because his heat map looks awful. Fielder’s numbers are down because fielder isn’t making plays in front/in back/whatever of him. Pitcher is walking more batters because pitcher is throwing fewer pitches in the zone.

But what about when that last one isn’t true? There are 179 pitchers who threw at least 1,000 pitches last year, and have thrown at least 500 pitches this year. The correlation between year-to-year changes in zone rate and changes in unintentional-BB rate is fairly modest: about .4. That means there must be a lot to not walking batters other than throwing pitches in the strike zone.

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June 7, 2013 5:00 am

Five to Watch: Checking in on the Holy Trinity

10

Bret Sayre

Bret looks at the quintet of hurlers that has met the strikeout, walk, and ground-ball benchmarks that generally ensure a pitcher's success.

About a month ago, Russell Carleton talked about pitcher stats and when they stabilize. And now that we’re two months into the season, the time has come where we can look at some of the high-ticket items my eyes drift toward on the stat page without worrying about being distracted by small sample sizes. These performances are real and whether or not they continue, we will always be able to look back upon them through sepia tones and Instagram filters.

If you’ve read my stuff from a previous life, you’ve undoubtedly heard me talk about the Holy Trinity as it comes to starting pitchers. It encompasses the three skills that are most important to the art of pitching: getting strikeouts, reducing walks, and keeping the ball on the ground. Any pitcher who does at least one of these things well can be a major leaguer. Just two of these qualities are enough to be a star, but the pitchers who can do all three are the ones who are special, because they have the largest amount of control over their downside risk.

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February 8, 2013 5:00 am

Transaction Analysis: Seattle Royale

21

R.J. Anderson

The Mariners lock up their ace. Is he worth the risk?

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January 4, 2013 5:00 am

Raising Aces: Then and Now: It's Good to Be the King

4

Doug Thorburn

Felix Hernandez has been a phenom for years, but his pitching style has changed significantly since he made it to the majors.

The legend of Felix Hernandez is surprisingly old for an athlete so young. Signed out of Venezuela at the age of 16, King Felix flew through the Mariners system, earning his regal nickname en route to the major leagues and staking his claim to the Safeco Field throne while he was still a teenager. With his combination of elite talent and the work ethic to realize his upside, Hernandez is the ideal pitcher to profile in this first edition of a new series on pitcher development, as we trace his career path “then and now.”

The BP staffers were cautious with ranking the inexperienced right-hander when constructing the Top 50 Prospects list of 2004, eventually leaving him off the list in favor of more seasoned players, but Hernandez would earn redemption in the '05 Annual, receiving the highest pitcher ranking as the number-three overall prospect on the Top 50. King Felix's stay atop the prospect rankings was brief, as he permanently lost his eligibility with a dominant debut that cemented his status as the future of pitching in the Great Northwest. Hernandez’s talent fueled predictions of immediate stardom, as reflected in the following line from his '05 player comment: “He's going to finish in the top three in Cy Young voting in 2006…”

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Ben and Sam discuss Austin Jackson's excellent catch, whether he's the best defensive center fielder in baseball, and whether it's even possible to decide one way or another, then dissect Seattle's eight-game winning streak to see if it's the start of something good or a fluke that will soon be forgotten.

Ben and Sam discuss Austin Jackson's excellent catch, whether he's the best defensive center fielder in baseball, and whether it's even possible to decide one way or another, then dissect Seattle's eight-game winning streak to see if it's the start of something good or a fluke that will soon be forgotten.

Effectively Wild Episode 28: "Austin Jackson and Debating Defense/What Does the Mariners' Winning Streak Mean?"

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Felix Hernandez wasn't wild on Wednesday, but this image of him is. In a good way.

Felix Hernandez was not, himself, a wild thing on Wednesday, when he beat the Rays without allowing a baserunner (or "pitched a perfect game," as we say in the biz). He threw 113 pitches, and 77 of them were strikes. He went to only three three-ball counts.

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August 16, 2012 12:15 pm

The Prospectus Hit List: Thursday, August 16

3

Matthew Kory

So much power in these rankings that [topical Melky Cabrera reference]

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Felix Hernandez is so young.

2005: Felix Hernandez debuts, pitches 84 innings, loses rookie eligiblity.

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Felix Hernandez shut out the Yankees on Saturday, and he did it without throwing many pitches.

On Saturday afternoon, Felix Hernandez shut out the Yankees at Yankee Stadium, allowing two hits and two walks and striking out six. That in itself is a very impressive achievement, given that the Yankees have scored the third-most runs per game in baseball this season, and also given that Yankee Stadium is not a particularly pleasant place to pitch. (The Yankees had averaged over five runs per game there before today.) Even more impressive is the fact that he did it with only 101 pitches. No pitcher has thrown a complete game against the Yankees with fewer pitches since Roy Halladay did it with 96 in 2008. If you want to shut out the Yankees, and you don't want it to take a long time, your best bet is to have Roy Halladay or Felix Hernandez.

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August 2, 2012 5:00 am

The Process: The Mariners' Missed Opportunity

39

Bradley Ankrom

Dealing Felix Hernandez at this year's non-waiver trade deadline could have significantly brightened the Mariners' future.

A true no. 1 starter is the rarest commodity in baseball, and the Seattle Mariners have had one in Felix Hernandez for the better part of a decade. Unfortunately, much of Hernandez’s value has been wasted on uncompetitive clubs: only twice since he reached the big leagues in 2005 have the Mariners finished above .500.

The subject of dealing their homegrown superstar is a sensitive one for Mariners fans, but an objective look at the facts suggests that the future of the organization would be much brighter if general manager Jack Zduriencik had moved Hernandez to a contender for a package of young impact bats that are close to big-league ready prior to this summer's non-waiver trade deadline.

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July 3, 2012 5:00 am

Western Front: Ready, Set, No!

5

Geoff Young

Geoff compares members of the Tacoma Rainiers to Twilight characters using the 20-80 scale. Or maybe he would have, if he'd been able to see the team play.

“Who said that?”

“Nobody, I was just trying to make you feel better.”

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Google's biographic pictures of baseball players aren't always what you expect.

Recently, Google began putting short bios of prominent subjects at the top of search results. It's a nifty time saver if all you need to know is What Is Kreayshawn, or whether Angel Pagan switch-hits. There is usually a photo of the person, too. The photo, though, isn't always the most representative photo of the person. That's what normal companies would do. Not Google. Oh, no, not Google*.

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