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Articles Tagged Fastballs 

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06-25

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BP Unfiltered: Ross Detwiler and the All-Fastball All-Stars
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-05

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1

Working the Count: Jose Abreu's Not-So-Slow Bat
by
Noah Woodward

12-05

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19

Measuring Pitching with TrackMan
by
Zach Day

10-30

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16

Baseball ProGUESTus: Is Speed Enough?: A PITCHf/x Look at the Effect of Fastball Velocity and Movement
by
Jonathan Hale

05-10

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2

What Makes A Good Changeup
by
Harry Pavlidis

06-01

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32

Overthinking It: Bryce Harper's Brain is a Neural Net Processor
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-11

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1

The Stats Go Marching In: All About Velocity
by
Max Marchi

08-26

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4

Baseball ProGUESTus: Do Pitchers Really Trade Speed for Command?
by
Graham Goldbeck

08-17

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11

Spinning Yarn: Why are Batters Hit by Pitches?
by
Mike Fast

07-19

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8

Pebble Hunting: Footloose and Fastball-Free
by
Sam Miller

07-12

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11

Spitballing: The Future is Now
by
Jeremy Greenhouse

05-24

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1

Clubhouse Confidential: Bend It Like Halladay
by
Marc Carig

05-03

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35

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: U Got the Look: Pitchers, Part I
by
Jason Parks

04-27

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9

Spinning Yarn: A Soria Subject
by
Mike Fast

03-18

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23

Baseball ProGUESTus: Looking at Pitches Through the Batter's Eyes
by
Matt Lentzner

03-08

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3

Painting the Black: Manny B.'s Inside Adventure
by
R.J. Anderson

12-09

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16

Spinning Yarn: The Forkball
by
Mike Fast

10-26

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8

Spinning Yarn: Interpreting Pitch Classifications
by
Mike Fast

05-03

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3

Fantasy Beat: Swing And A Miss: The Aramis Ramirez Story
by
Craig Brown

04-20

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14

Expanded Horizons: Lincecum's Velocity and Movement
by
Tommy Bennett

01-11

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16

Checking the Numbers: Side Effects on Pitchers' Hitting
by
Russell A. Carleton and Eric Seidman

10-23

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Player Profile: Robinson Cano
by
Marc Normandin

05-15

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17

Checking the Numbers: Dissecting the Enigma
by
Eric Seidman

05-06

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11

Zumaya's Zooming
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-23

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31

Checking the Numbers: Inside Pitch-f/x
by
Eric Seidman

06-09

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Ballad of the Fatigued
by
Eric Seidman

05-13

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Furcal En Fuego
by
Eric Seidman

04-10

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Schrodinger's Bat: Defense and Pitch Classification
by
Dan Fox

10-11

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Schrodinger's Bat: On Atmosphere, Probability, and Prediction
by
Dan Fox

08-16

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Schrodinger's Bat: Putting the Pedal to the Metal
by
Dan Fox

07-05

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Schrodinger's Bat: Searching for the Gyroball
by
Dan Fox

06-14

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Schrodinger's Bat: The Science and Art of Building a Better Pitcher Profile
by
Dan Fox

08-23

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Prospectus Game of the Week: New York Yankees @ Boston Red Sox, 8/20/06
by
Derek Jacques

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Ross Detwiler threw 42 straight four-seamers or sinkers on Tuesday. Where does that put him on the consecutive fastball pantheon?

On Tuesday night, the Nationals and Brewers played baseball for well over five hours, calling it quits only after Ryan Zimmerman hit a two-run homer in the 16th inning to put Milwaukee away. Zimmerman, who had two other hits and this diving catch, claimed the headlines, but the game had another hero, albeit one slightly less sung: deposed starter Ross Detwiler, who held the Brewers scoreless from the 10th through the 14th.

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The book on Abreu said that he'd struggle against inside heat. Has the book been right?

When the White Sox signed Jose Abreu for $68 million over six years, responses ranged from optimism to skepticism about how the Cuban rookie’s swing might fare in the United States. In this year’s Baseball Prospectus Annual, for instance, we wondered whether Abreu possessed a swing that could “be tamed by well-placed fastballs on the inner half.” Baseball America’s 2014 Prospect Handbook included another knock: “Some scouts worry about his double toe-tap stride and average bat speed, fearing they will inhibit his ability to catch up with premium velocity on the inner half.”

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Former MLB pitcher Zach Day explains why velocity isn't a fastball's only important characteristic.

Zach Day was drafted by the Yankees in the fifth round of the 1996 draft and pitched for three MLB teams from 2002 to 2006. He had stints with the Expos, Nationals, and Rockies, compiling a 21-27 record with a 4.66 ERA. Zach has been with TrackMan Baseball since 2008 and has played a critical role in introducing the technology to pitching coaches, scouts, and on-field personnel. This is the first in a series of articles in which he’ll discuss what TrackMan’s measurements reveal about pitching.

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Is there a sweet spot for velocity?

Most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers, and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Jonathan Hale has been using PITCHf/x to answer baseball questions all over the 'net since 2008. He once missed a Duane Ward curveball by three feet. You can read his writing about the Blue Jays or tell him what he should be analyzing next at The Mockingbird.

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Some pitchers' changeups get better results than others. Can we identify the factors that matter?

What makes a good changeup? Speed differential (i.e. being 7-10 MPH off a fastball)? Is it depth or fade, perhaps the tumble on a splitter? Location and command? Deception (e.g. matching arm speed and release point)? Or is it context, how the batters are setup based on the count or the read of their swing?

Oh, right. Results. We judge on results.

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How and why pitchers have dealt with Bryce Harper and Mike Trout in dramatically different ways, and how Harper has already adjusted.

There’s something weird and wonderful about the distribution of pitches seen by this season’s two most exciting under-21-year-olds. David Golebiewski pointed it out the other day using information from Inside Edge, and I wanted to see whether PITCHf/x data would show the same thing. It did. That was the only excuse I needed to write about Bryce Harper and Mike Trout, neither of whom can make a move on a baseball field without leaving a trail of article topics behind him.

Here is a list of the hitters who’ve seen the lowest percentage of fastballs this season, combining four- and two-seamers and not counting cutters (classifications courtesy of Harry Pavlidis):

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Max examines all the factors that influence pitch velocity, lays out his simple and complex approaches to making PITCHf/x information more accurate, and determines how hard the Nationals are really throwing.

Cooling off the radar guns
No more calling Strasburg's 91 mph pitch a 'changeup'. It's disheartening to like 98% of the rest of us for whom 91 is a 'fastball'.—@BMcCarthy32

Everyone likes looking at radar guns.


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Taking an old piece of baseball advice to task with Sportvision's new COMMANDf/x system for tracking the catcher's glove.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Graham Goldbeck is a data analyst at Sportvision, the company behind PITCHf/x, HITf/x, COMMANDf/x, and FIELDf/x. In the past, Graham was a writer for the website Beyond the Boxscore and worked as a baseball operations intern for the Oakland Athletics and Tampa Bay Rays.

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What factors determine how often hitters take one for the team?

Every season major league pitchers throw tens of thousands of pitches inside off the plate, yet they hit batters “only” about 1500-1800 times in a season. Why do some inside pitches hit the batter, while others do not?

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In his debut as a BP regular, Sam wonders whether we'll ever see a hurler throw nothing but heat, and whether we should.

In the second inning against the Mets on July 2, Bartolo Colon threw an 0-1 slider to Angel Pagan, and Pagan grounded it to the shortstop. An hour later, with two outs in the fifth, Colon threw a 2-2 slider to Jason Bay, this one low and outside for ball three.

In between, the game settled into a predictable routine: Ken Rosenthal appeared in a bow-tie. Jose Reyes disappeared with a tight hamstring. Tim McCarver considered different ways to pronounce Cleburne, Texas. Puns about Dillon Gee. And, from Bartolo Colon, 40 fastballs in a row. 

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Evaluating each pitcher who appeared in the Futures Game and identifying the most similar current major-league pitchers and pitches with the aid of PITCHf/x.

Sample size or apple pies? You can choose only one. Apple pies—that’s what I thought. A quick glimpse of a prospect might not tell us all we need to know, but it’s still plenty tempting to draw possibly premature conclusions. With that in mind, I decided to watch the Futures Game for the second straight year and make snap judgments on every single pitcher, even though none of them threw more than a couple dozen pitches. Last year, my main takeaway was that Zach Britton was the man. He still is. This year, I came to the conclusion that the only way to top a Bernie Williams rendition of the national anthem is to catch a Sal Fasano first-base coach sighting.

The following table lists every pitcher who appeared in the game, in order of appearance. I’ll tackle them one by one, offering comps to current major leaguers where applicable, as well as links to videos of similar pitches.

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May 24, 2011 9:00 am

Clubhouse Confidential: Bend It Like Halladay

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Marc Carig

Pitchers have gotten bent, causing hitters to complain about too much tail.

NEW YORK—Mets manager Terry Collins caught a glimpse of the evolution in relief pitcher Bobby Parnell.

It happened sometime last year when both were at Triple-A Buffalo, Collins as the team's minor league field coordinator, and Parnell as the ninth-round draft pick with a fastball that routinely tickles the triple digits. Collins had seen the flame-throwing type before, although during his time in the game, they have become much more common.

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