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Articles Tagged Eric Karros 

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05-02

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8

The Platoon Advantage: Why Rookies of the Year Fail
by
Bill Parker

05-05

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7

Changing Speeds: The Designated Jester
by
Ken Funck

12-21

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52

Prospectus Hit and Run: Alomar, the Crime Dog, the Big Cat and Big Mac
by
Jay Jaffe

02-11

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Spring Training Preview
by
Joe Sheehan

07-29

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Transaction Analysis: July 27
by
Christina Kahrl

05-25

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Prospectus Triple Play: Chicago White Sox, Oakland Athletics, Philadelphia Phillies
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-11

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Transaction Analysis: January 12-February 6, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

02-09

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0

Can Of Corn: Oakland's Offense
by
Dayn Perry

02-04

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Prospectus Today: Evaluating Evans
by
Joe Sheehan

10-07

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Chicago Cubs vs. Florida Marlins
by
Christina Kahrl

09-25

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0

Prospectus Triple Play: Anaheim Angels, Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-19

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Prospectus Today: Handicapping
by
Joe Sheehan

08-06

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Lies, Damned Lies: Quantum Leap
by
Nate Silver

07-31

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0

Prospectus Triple Play: Anaheim Angels, Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-29

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Transaction Analysis: July 25-28
by
Christina Kahrl

07-25

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Transaction Analysis: July 7-20
by
Christina Kahrl

07-02

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Transaction Analysis: June 26-30, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

06-13

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Transaction Analysis: June 6-9
by
Christina Kahrl

05-08

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Prospectus Triple Play: Anaheim Angels, Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers
by
Baseball Prospectus

04-24

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Prospectus Triple Play: Anaheim Angels, Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers
by
Baseball Prospectus

04-22

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Box Lunch: The Week in Box Scores, April 14-20
by
Keith Scherer

04-09

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Transaction Analysis: March 25-April 6, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

03-21

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0

PECOTA Does Fantasy
by
Nate Silver

02-05

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Transaction Analysis: Transaction Analysis, The Wests
by
Christina Kahrl

12-04

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The Daily Prospectus: Knowing What's Important
by
Ryan Wilkins

11-26

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Prospectus Feature: 2002 HACKING MASS Results: All Players, By Name
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-23

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Prospectus Feature: Touring the Minors: Organizational Overview: Los Angeles Dodgers
by
Keith Scherer

03-21

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Transaction Analysis: March 14-18, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

09-07

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Aim For The Head: Quality of Opposition
by
Keith Woolner

08-03

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The Daily Prospectus: Not Making a Difficult Decision
by
Joe Sheehan

02-25

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Transaction Analysis: February 16-24, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

05-19

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Damn the Torpedoes! Full Speed Ahead!
by
Christina Kahrl

04-28

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Transaction Analysis: April 24-26
by
Christina Kahrl

04-01

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Projected 1998 National League Standings
by
Baseball Prospectus

03-25

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Transaction Analysis: March 20-23
by
Christina Kahrl

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August 6, 2003 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Quantum Leap

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Nate Silver

Up until this season, my clearest memory of Jose Guillen is as the object of some very unflattering jeering in the right field bleachers at Wrigley Field. The bleacher bums are never kind to opposing outfielders, but Guillen, being young, bad, and foreign, was a particularly vulnerable target. Guillen reacted to the taunts by alternately appearing hopelessly dejected and demonstratively angry, only making matters worse. Though he got his revenge that day--hitting a home run off crowd-favorite/headcase Turk Wendell--I've always had trouble watching him play without the phrase Jo-se-do-you-suck! running warbled, drunken, Francis Scott Off-Key through my head. However cruel, the taunting had proved prescient. Back in 1997, Guillen had time and an abundance of raw talent on his side. Bouncing between four organizations and failing to demonstrate any development, Guillen had regressed to the level of benchwarmer; his career .239 EqA entering the season was below replacement level for a corner outfielder. If not for his powerful right arm (an impressive tool, but overrated in its importance) and his much-tarnished Topps All-Rookie Team trophy, Guillen might have been riding shuttles between Louisville and Chattanooga or selling real estate instead of holding down a fourth outfielder job in the bigs. This season, of course, Guillen has had the last laugh. Easily the most productive hitter on the Reds this year, Guillen filled in admirably for Ken Griffey Jr. Now traded to the A's, he's been charged with the Herculean task of trying to make up for an entire outfield's worth of mediocrity, salvaging Billy Beane's reputation as a deadline dealer nonpareil in the process. But what if Guillen turns back into a pumpkin?

However cruel, the taunting had proved prescient. Back in 1997, Guillen had time and an abundance of raw talent on his side. Bouncing between four organizations and failing to demonstrate any development, Guillen had regressed to the level of benchwarmer; his career .239 EqA entering the season was below replacement level for a corner outfielder. If not for his powerful right arm (an impressive tool, but overrated in its importance) and his much-tarnished Topps All-Rookie Team trophy, Guillen might have been riding shuttles between Louisville and Chattanooga or selling real estate instead of holding down a fourth outfielder job in the bigs.

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Troy Glaus may need a Fame Audit. The Cubs teeter between contention and wait 'til next year. The Tigers haven't turned it around in the second half. These and other news and notes out of Anaheim, Chicago, and Detroit in today's Prospectus Triple Play.

  • Fame Audit: Perhaps the funniest and most sharply written site on the Internet--save Baseball Prospectus, of course--FameTracker.com's The Fame Audit is in a class by itself. The premise? Each week, the Fame Audit staff takes a celebrity who we (generally) know and (mostly) love, and puts his/her status through a rigorous and highly subjective evaluation, looking to determine whether or not that person is as famous as he/she deserves to be. Granted, it isn't exactly the most original idea in the world, but thanks to the Fame Audit staff's ability to be absolutely scathing in their assessments, it does make for some pretty entertaining copy.
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    July 29, 2003 12:00 am

    Transaction Analysis: July 25-28

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    Christina Kahrl

    The Cubs made a steal of a deal; the Expos are getting Vladimir Guererro back, and not a moment too soon; the A's are investing their money unwisely; the Cardinals take another hit in losing Matt Morris; and the Padres get a small-scale boost in regaining Phil Nevin. All this and much more news from around the league in your Tuesday edition of Transaction Analysis.

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    July 25, 2003 12:00 am

    Transaction Analysis: July 7-20

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    Christina Kahrl

    Bill Stoneman and Mike Scioscia get rewarded for 2002. The Indians and Rangers swap pitching prospect for hitting prospect. The Yankees grab Armando Benitez in a non-Sierran move. The Jays get a steal in Stewart-for-Kielty. These and other tidbits, plus a full array of Kahrlisms, in this edition of Transaction Analysis.

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    July 2, 2003 12:00 am

    Transaction Analysis: June 26-30, 2003

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    Christina Kahrl

    Brad Fullmer's down in Anaheim, setting back the defending champs just that much more; the Indians are beginning their youth-movement; Mike Sweeney is taking some time off in Kansas City just when the Royals need him most; Brandon Claussen finally makes it back after the long road through surgery; and BP favorite Kevin Young gets shown the door in Pittsburgh. All this and much more news from around the league in your Wednesday edition of Transaction Analysis.

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    June 13, 2003 12:00 am

    Transaction Analysis: June 6-9

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    Christina Kahrl

    Darin Erstad returns to Anaheim just as Jeff DaVanon's terrorizing the league. David Dellucci hits the DL just as he'd started to find a groove. Hee Seop Choi's should be back healthy and playing after a scary moment at Wrigley. Vlad Guerrero's DL stint has Expos fans clamoring for Terrmel "the Hammer" Sledge. News, notes, and Kahrlisms from 17 major league teams in this edition of Transaction Analysis.

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    Angels: Star Performer: Much like Dirk Diggler in the closing scene of Boogie Nights, the Anaheim Angels' bullpen has been a bright, shining star this season. First in the AL in Adjusted Runs Prevented--and third in the majors, overall--the Anaheim relief squadron is essentially the only thing keeping the team afloat at this point, save Garret Anderson's continuing quest to make statheads taste their own bile. Cubs: Lineup: The biggest lineup concern continues to be at third base, where Mark Bellhorn has not been able to get it going. Bellhorn provides two valuable skills--power and patience-which theoretically can trump a low batting average. Unfortunately, thus far he is showing no power at all (five extra base hits in 28 games) and is hitting just .214. Although I am sure this is making Jeff Bower giddy, Dusty Baker is less amused. Tigers: Streaks: The Tigers stood at 3-20 in late April at the end of their road series with the AL West. But stop the presses! They're on a four-game winning streak! Here's how they have done against the AL East: Home vs. Baltimore: 0-3, 9 runs scored, 22 runs against Home vs. Tampa Bay: 1-2, 13 runs scored, 13 runs against At Baltimore: 3-0, 22 runs scored, 11 runs against

    Unlike the cross-town Dodgers, however--the team that leads the planet in ARP--the Angels bullpen has mainly succeeded thanks to the dominance of two pitchers rather than six. And who might those two pitchers be? Troy Percival and Francisco Rodriguez, perhaps? Well, not exactly. Instead, it is Brendan Donnelly and Scot Shields who have combined to be perhaps the most dangerous one-two punch in the American League this season, allowing just four earned runs in 46 IP. Check it out:

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    Garret Anderson takes aim at the Earl of Doubles while playoff heroes John Lackey and K-Rod struggle in the early going for the Angels. Mark Prior Cy Young, Hee Seop Choi Rookie of the Year, Mark Bellhorn benchwarmer? Could happen. And the Tigers try to avoid making history while Alan Trammell works Ramon Santiago, Omar Infante and other kids into the league's worst lineup.

    Honorable Mention: Brad Fullmer (.417/.478/.617). Yes, he's technically been more productive than Anderson (.388/.424/.624) up to this point, but the difference in playing time closes the gap between the two players, and then some.

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    So far, this column has been a day-by-day review of factoids. That's a fun and profitable way to review box scores, but this week I have re-oriented Box Lunch toward a topical focus, using Earl Weaver's maxims to introduce a variety of subjects. There's little worth knowing about baseball that Weaver hasn't already covered, and so far I have found more than 40 observations in Weaver on Strategy that are relevant to things we can study using box scores as the primary source. This week the emphasis is on how managers select and use their rosters. "When a manager has been pushing the same buttons day after day and losing, he'd better start pushing different ones." Alan Trammell is doing the drunkard's walk. On Wednesday he started Bobby Higginson in center field. It was the first time Higginson played the position in the majors, and he hasn't played there since. And then on Saturday, with his team sniffling along at 1-14 and losing its 16th game 9-2, Trammell had Craig Paquette pinch-hit for Higginson. It was the eighth inning and Royals reliever Albie Lopez was working on his fifth consecutive scoreless inning, so maybe it was despair, and maybe it was the managerial equivalent of Brownian Motion, but the move had no strategic justification. Removing your best hitter is the worst way to start a rally. Paquette is Trammell's de facto designated pinch-hitter, so maybe he was trying to keep Paquette fresh. Pinch-hitters come in cold and they can't really be kept fresh, but even if you could crisp them up with two or three swings every other day, what would be gained by wasting one of your stars' turns on a bag of sand like Paquette? It wasn't a platoon decision. Higginson is a lefty and Paquette and Lopez are righties. If Higginson was injured you can't tell by the box scores; he had played the previous inning and was back in the lineup the next day, and there was nothing in the next day's news about an injury to Higginson. All I can think of is that Trammell was either conceding the game by giving him a breather or--this has to happen sometimes--a leisurely bathroom break.

    Alan Trammell is doing the drunkard's walk. On Wednesday he started Bobby Higginson in center field. It was the first time Higginson played the position in the majors, and he hasn't played there since. And then on Saturday, with his team sniffling along at 1-14 and losing its 16th game 9-2, Trammell had Craig Paquette pinch-hit for Higginson. It was the eighth inning and Royals reliever Albie Lopez was working on his fifth consecutive scoreless inning, so maybe it was despair, and maybe it was the managerial equivalent of Brownian Motion, but the move had no strategic justification. Removing your best hitter is the worst way to start a rally. Paquette is Trammell's de facto designated pinch-hitter, so maybe he was trying to keep Paquette fresh. Pinch-hitters come in cold and they can't really be kept fresh, but even if you could crisp them up with two or three swings every other day, what would be gained by wasting one of your stars' turns on a bag of sand like Paquette? It wasn't a platoon decision. Higginson is a lefty and Paquette and Lopez are righties. If Higginson was injured you can't tell by the box scores; he had played the previous inning and was back in the lineup the next day, and there was nothing in the next day's news about an injury to Higginson. All I can think of is that Trammell was either conceding the game by giving him a breather or--this has to happen sometimes--a leisurely bathroom break.

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    April 9, 2003 12:00 am

    Transaction Analysis: March 25-April 6, 2003

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    Christina Kahrl

    The Snakes bury John Patterson, the Red Sox sort through a batch of soft tossers, the Marlins vie for a 25-catcher roster, and the Devil Rays solve all their problems by grabbing Al Martin and Damion Easley.

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    March 21, 2003 12:00 am

    PECOTA Does Fantasy

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    Nate Silver

    Fresh off PECOTA's maiden voyage into rotoland, Nate Silver publishes the PECOTA-generated roto values used by the BP team at the recent Tout Wars National League draft. Hint: pay the premium for studs.

    You can import these values into a spreadsheet by selecting them in your browser and copying them, pasting them into a text file (i.e. Notepad), and opening the new text file with your spreadsheet (i.e. Excel).

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    February 5, 2003 2:19 pm

    Transaction Analysis: Transaction Analysis, The Wests

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    Christina Kahrl

    Re-signed INF-R Benji Gil and DH-L Brad Fullmer to one-year contracts. Signed OF-R Eric Owens to a one-year contract, and LHP Rich Rodriguez, 2B-R Adam Riggs, and UT-R Oscar Salazar to minor league contracts. Avoided arbitration with 2B-L Adam Kennedy, INF-B Scott Spiezio, and LHPs Jarrod Washburn and Scott Schoeneweis. Claimed C-R Wil Nieves off of waivers (from the Padres).

    IN THIS ISSUE

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