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Articles Tagged Eric Karros 

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05-02

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8

The Platoon Advantage: Why Rookies of the Year Fail
by
Bill Parker

05-05

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7

Changing Speeds: The Designated Jester
by
Ken Funck

12-21

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52

Prospectus Hit and Run: Alomar, the Crime Dog, the Big Cat and Big Mac
by
Jay Jaffe

02-11

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Spring Training Preview
by
Joe Sheehan

07-29

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Transaction Analysis: July 27
by
Christina Kahrl

05-25

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Prospectus Triple Play: Chicago White Sox, Oakland Athletics, Philadelphia Phillies
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-11

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Transaction Analysis: January 12-February 6, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

02-09

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0

Can Of Corn: Oakland's Offense
by
Dayn Perry

02-04

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Prospectus Today: Evaluating Evans
by
Joe Sheehan

10-07

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Chicago Cubs vs. Florida Marlins
by
Christina Kahrl

09-25

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0

Prospectus Triple Play: Anaheim Angels, Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-19

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0

Prospectus Today: Handicapping
by
Joe Sheehan

08-06

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Lies, Damned Lies: Quantum Leap
by
Nate Silver

07-31

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0

Prospectus Triple Play: Anaheim Angels, Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-29

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Transaction Analysis: July 25-28
by
Christina Kahrl

07-25

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Transaction Analysis: July 7-20
by
Christina Kahrl

07-02

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Transaction Analysis: June 26-30, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

06-13

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Transaction Analysis: June 6-9
by
Christina Kahrl

05-08

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0

Prospectus Triple Play: Anaheim Angels, Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers
by
Baseball Prospectus

04-24

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Prospectus Triple Play: Anaheim Angels, Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers
by
Baseball Prospectus

04-22

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0

Box Lunch: The Week in Box Scores, April 14-20
by
Keith Scherer

04-09

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Transaction Analysis: March 25-April 6, 2003
by
Christina Kahrl

03-21

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0

PECOTA Does Fantasy
by
Nate Silver

02-05

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Transaction Analysis: Transaction Analysis, The Wests
by
Christina Kahrl

12-04

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The Daily Prospectus: Knowing What's Important
by
Ryan Wilkins

11-26

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Prospectus Feature: 2002 HACKING MASS Results: All Players, By Name
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-23

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Prospectus Feature: Touring the Minors: Organizational Overview: Los Angeles Dodgers
by
Keith Scherer

03-21

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Transaction Analysis: March 14-18, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

09-07

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0

Aim For The Head: Quality of Opposition
by
Keith Woolner

08-03

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The Daily Prospectus: Not Making a Difficult Decision
by
Joe Sheehan

02-25

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Transaction Analysis: February 16-24, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

05-19

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Damn the Torpedoes! Full Speed Ahead!
by
Christina Kahrl

04-28

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Transaction Analysis: April 24-26
by
Christina Kahrl

04-01

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0

Projected 1998 National League Standings
by
Baseball Prospectus

03-25

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Transaction Analysis: March 20-23
by
Christina Kahrl

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May 2, 2012 9:03 am

The Platoon Advantage: Why Rookies of the Year Fail

8

Bill Parker

A BBWAA stamp of approval doesn't mean a glorious career. Chris Coghlan is the latest to prove it.

On Monday, the Marlins sent Chris Coghlan to Triple-A, his second trip in that direction in as many years.

It’s been a rough, rough ride for Coghlan ever since his 2009 season, when he hit .321/.390/.460, riding a .372/.472/.523 second half right to the National League Rookie of the Year Award. In 2010, Coghlan had slipped to just .268/.335/.383 in 91 games, then hurt himself attempting to hit Wes Helms with a pie after a walk-off win, missing the rest of the season. In 2011, he slipped even further, then in June was sent down to Triple-A, where he spent the remainder of the season, He opened 2012 with Miami, but wasn’t taking any time away from Logan Morrison, Emilio Bonifacio or Giancarlo Stanton, hitting .118/.143/.147 in just 36 plate appearances before Monday’s demotion. 

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May 5, 2010 6:35 pm

Changing Speeds: The Designated Jester

7

Ken Funck

Most teams don't use their final roster spot on guys who are just good in the clubhouse.

The myriad components that make up a baseball team, perhaps the most slippery to isolate and quantify is "team chemistry." Pitching, batting, fielding, speed, power, leadership, strategy, clutch performance, fundamentals, lineup balance, health, luck—each of these, when assembled properly, can make up the DNA of a championship ballclub, and sabermetricians are constantly engaged in a sort of Baseball Genome Project, trying as best they can to tease out and quantify each individual factor. Most of these relate solely to the performance of players between the lines, and it’s here that baseball’s gene sequencers have made the most progress, making their way (as Colin Wyers recently described) toward accurately identifying the relationship between the components of each player’s on-field performance and a team’s wins and losses.

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The cases to make for the best on the ballot at first and second base.

The BBWAA Hall of Fame ballot has been out for a few weeks, and by now just about everybody who's got an opinion on the subject of which candidates are worthy of election has beaten the Christmas rush by weighing in on Rock, Hawk, Rik Aalbert, and friends. While the cabal which sent Jim Rice to Cooperstown last year might like to believe that I've told my spreadsheet to shut up, the reality-deadlines for this year's annual impeding my progress-is much more mundane. There's still time to beat the Christmas rush, however, so away we go.

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February 11, 2008 12:00 am

Spring Training Preview

0

Joe Sheehan

The Cubs made the best offseason move of any team in the division, and consequently are the team to beat among the Central's six heading into 2008.

Chicago Cubs

Where: Mesa, Arizona (Cactus League)
2007 record: 85-77 (1st, NL Central)
New guys: Jose Ascanio, Jon Lieber, Kosuke Fukudome
Gone guys: Cliff Floyd, Koyie Hill (NRI), Jacque Jones, Jason Kendall, Will Ohman, Angel Pagan, Mark Prior
Wow, he's still here? Felix Pie has been traded to Baltimore in a deal for Brian Roberts a thousand times in the media, and not once in MLB. With the Orioles having added Adam Jones, it would seem less likely that they'd acquire Pie, leaving the 23-year-old free to roam center field for the Cubs.
Winter grade: A-. Their only move of note-signing Fukudome-was a terrific one, giving them the OBP boost they sorely needed, and solidifying a position, right field, that was a problem in 2007.
NRI to watch: God bless him. Chad Fox, 37 years old and nearly three years removed from his last professional appearance, is in camp. Fox, who we used to describe as "effective when healthy," hasn't been either since 2003. Still, you have to root for a guy who wants it this badly.
Job battle to track: There's no obvious closer, as Ryan Dempster is being moved back to the rotation after a few years of relief. That leaves Kerry Wood, Bobby Howry and Carlos Marmol, all hard-throwing righties, grappling for the job. This seems like a good place for Piniella to re-create his 1990 Reds approach, with no closer and all three guys available for work from the seventh through the ninth.
One move to make: Slapping Lou Piniella with a clue stick. Piniella, who has a lot of good qualities as a manager, indicated last week that his lineup would feature Alfonso Soriano and Ryan Theriot in the top two spots, with Fukudome fifth. The Cubs' biggest problems on offense have been not having enough runners on base for Derrek Lee and Aramis Ramirez. Hitting Fukudome behind those two is a waste of his talents. If Soriano has to bat leadoff because he's fast, fine; at least bat Fukudome second and Theriot down in the lineup where he belongs.

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July 29, 2004 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: July 27

0

Christina Kahrl

The Phillies lose their most effective reliever. The A's set Eric Karros free. The Twins bring up another prospect to torment. And a Curtis Pride sighting! All this news and much more in your Thursday Transaction Analysis.

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The White Sox are scoring runs in bunches this year, thanks in no small part to...Juan Uribe? The A's acquisition of Eric Karros isn't looking too good, especially when you consider that Graham Koonce is still waiting in the wings. And the Phillies have finally grabbed a piece of first place in the NL East after a month of unperforming. All this and much more news from Chicago, Oakland, and Philadelphia in your Tuesday edition of Prospectus Triple Play.

  • Hot Starts: Scoring runs has certainly not been a problem for the White Sox this season, due in no small part to the aliens who have apparently abducted Juan Uribe and replaced him with a clone that doesn't remember failing to achieve a .300 OBP in Coors Field the last two seasons. So far this year, Uribe has been knocking the ball around at a .340/.395/.521 pace, greatly justifying his position near the head of the Chicago batting order. Combined with the equally surprising performance of Willie Harris (.308/.370/.367), the top of the Sox lineup has been setting the table with the fine china for the sluggers in the heart of the order.
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    February 11, 2004 12:00 am

    Transaction Analysis: January 12-February 6, 2004

    0

    Christina Kahrl

    The Braves strike NRI gold with Russell Branyan. The Astros do what they need to do to compete in the NL Central. Everything you ever wanted to read about Eric Karros. The Padres address their chasm in center. These and other news, notes, and Kahrlisms in today's Transaction Analysis.

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    There's a new bit of conventional wisdom that's gaining traction in the media. It says the Oakland offense will be so bad in 2004 that they'll have trouble besting the amped-up Angels for the division title. I should know; I myself indulged in this bit of convention in a recent column I wrote for FoxSports.com, the gracious purveyors of my primary day job. The question I should've asked before pontificating on the subject at hand is this: is it actually true? Is the Oakland offense really in such desperate straits. First, let's acknowledge is no longer a team built around its run-scoring capabilities. Ever since the Moneyball furor, some observers haven't enjoyed pointing out that the A's are in fact a pitching-and-defense outfit. Pointing this out is no longer breaking news, and it never really was all that subversive. It's just true; Oakland hasn't ranked in the top half of AL in runs scored since 2001, but they've ranked second and first, respectively, the last two seasons in fewest runs allowed. Nevertheless, runs are runs, and the A's appear poised to lose quite a few of them on the offensive side of the ledger. Consider that shortstop Miguel Tejada and catcher Ramon Hernandez are both elsewhere. Tejada, among AL shortstops, finished third in Value Over Replacement Player (VORP), while Hernandez ranked fourth among AL catchers in VORP. Tejada and Hernandez also ranked second and fourth, respectively, on the team in VORP. That's a serious hunk of production lost by the team that ranked only ninth in the loop in runs scored.

    The question I should've asked before pontificating on the subject at hand is this: is it actually true? Is the Oakland offense really in such desperate straits. First, let's acknowledge is no longer a team built around its run-scoring capabilities. Ever since the Moneyball furor, some observers haven't enjoyed pointing out that the A's are in fact a pitching-and-defense outfit. Pointing this out is no longer breaking news, and it never really was all that subversive. It's just true; Oakland hasn't ranked in the top half of AL in runs scored since 2001, but they've ranked second and first, respectively, the last two seasons in fewest runs allowed.

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    February 4, 2004 12:00 am

    Prospectus Today: Evaluating Evans

    0

    Joe Sheehan

    Under new owner Frank McCourt--who has about as much of his own cash invested in the team as you do--the Dodgers have embarked on a search for a general manager. Current GM Dan Evans, who has held the job since October of 2001, hasn't been fired, and has been told he is welcome to interview for his job, which is awfully nice of McCourt. I can't even begin to describe how angry this whole thing makes me. It shouldn't; I have no emotional attachment to the Dodgers or Evans. However, the idea that Evans, who inherited a nearly impossible situation and has put the franchise on much more solid ground than it was when he arrived, could somehow find his job in danger just as his work could begin to bear fruit strikes me as patently unfair. The Dodgers have been contenders in both seasons under Evans, and their two-year record of 177-147 is fifth in the NL in that time. The Dodgers have achieved that mark despite the crushing weight of former GM Kevin Malone's worst mistakes. In both seasons, the Dodgers got next to nothing for more than $20 million of their money. Darren Dreifort took home nearly $22 million over two years, and threw a grand total of 60 2/3 innings, all in '03. In '02, Kevin Brown made $15.7 million while throwing just 63 2/3 frames (to the tune of a 4.81 ERA). This past year, Andy Ashby closed out his three-year deal by providing 78 innings of 5.18 ERA ball, while cashing in for $8.5 million.

    I can't even begin to describe how angry this whole thing makes me. It shouldn't; I have no emotional attachment to the Dodgers or Evans. However, the idea that Evans, who inherited a nearly impossible situation and has put the franchise on much more solid ground than it was when he arrived, could somehow find his job in danger just as his work could begin to bear fruit strikes me as patently unfair.

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    October 7, 2003 12:00 am

    Playoff Prospectus: Chicago Cubs vs. Florida Marlins

    0

    Christina Kahrl

    It's the all-underdog series, where virtually everyone outside of the greater St. Louis and Miami metropolitan areas seem to be entertaining fuzzy Cubby thoughts. After all, the Cubs are supremely telegenic, feature a healthy dose of celebrity, and some of the best pitching on the planet. But there's another organization in this series, one with a recent World Series win a couple of owners ago to its credit, something achieved with almost galling ease compared to the decades of North Side misery. Moreover, these latest Marlins are an interesting collection of homegrown talents, other people's prospects, a rented superstar, and the definitive retreaded manager.

    Lineups (AVG/OBP/SLG/EqA)

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    How does Francisco Rodriguez stack up with other AL rookies in 2003? If anyone's seen the real Shawn Estes lately, the Cubs would certainly like to know of his whereabouts. And the Detroit Tigers suck. All this and much more news from Anaheim, Chicago, and Detroit in your Thursday edition of Prospectus Triple Play.

  • Action Failed: And so it goes. Despite entering the season the as favorites in the AL West in many people's eyes, the Anaheim Angels have become just the 11th team since 1960 to finish below .500 the year after winning a World Series (they lost their 82nd game last Friday). The other underachievers? Check 'em out:
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    August 19, 2003 12:00 am

    Prospectus Today: Handicapping

    0

    Joe Sheehan

    Friday's column never happened. Had I written a Friday column, I definitely wouldn't have talked about how MLB hadn't rescheduled a Diamondbacks/Royals rainout yet, because they have (September 4), travel nightmares be damned. I certainly wouldn't have alluded to a Marlins/Braves matchup in the Division Series, which can't occur. There's no way I would have insinuated that the Mets and Rockies wouldn't play Friday night, because that would have been silly. But I didn't write a Friday column, so none of that happened.

    Had I written a Friday column, I definitely wouldn't have talked about how MLB hadn't rescheduled a Diamondbacks/Royals rainout yet, because they have (September 4), travel nightmares be damned. I certainly wouldn't have alluded to a Marlins/Braves matchup in the Division Series, which can't occur. There's no way I would have insinuated that the Mets and Rockies wouldn't play Friday night, because that would have been silly.

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