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Articles Tagged Dylan Bundy 

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05-06

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26

Dynasty Dynamics: AL East U25 Lists
by
Ben Carsley and Craig Goldstein

02-27

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34

Dynasty League Positional Rankings: Top 175 Starting Pitchers
by
Bret Sayre

02-27

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31

Fantasy Three-Year Projections: Starting Pitchers
by
Paul Sporer

02-26

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16

Get to Know: Starting Pitcher Prospects
by
Ben Carsley and Craig Goldstein

01-27

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104

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Top 101 Prospects
by
Jason Parks

01-07

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1

Perfect Game Presents: Before They Were Pros: AL East
by
Patrick Ebert, Todd Gold and David Rawnsley

06-28

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27

Overthinking It: Dylan Bundy, Elbow Injuries, and the Evidence That PRP Works
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-28

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 234: Byron Buxton, Joe Mauer, and the Twins/Dylan Bundy, Tommy John Surgery, and PRP
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

04-05

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37

Top Tools: Top Tools: Best Speed, Baserunning, and Makeup
by
BP Prospect Staff

02-28

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3

Minor League Update: Games of February 27
by
Jason Martinez

02-26

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7

Minor League Update: Spring Training Games: February 22-24
by
Jason Martinez

02-25

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118

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Top 101 Prospects
by
Jason Parks

02-15

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45

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Baltimore Orioles Top 10 Prospects
by
Jason Parks

01-28

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14

Minor League Update: Potential Impact Rookies In 2013 (AL EAST)
by
Jason Martinez

09-19

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11

BP Unfiltered: The Call-Up: Dylan Bundy
by
Hudson Belinsky

08-30

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14

Prospect Profile: Dylan Bundy
by
Hudson Belinsky

08-15

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7

Future Shock: The Bundy Dilemma
by
Kevin Goldstein

08-01

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17

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Rarified Air: The Top 10 Prospects in the Minors
by
Jason Parks

06-14

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9

Future Shock: Picking Pitchers
by
Kevin Goldstein

06-12

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24

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: Midseason Review: Boogie Nights Edition
by
Jason Parks

05-23

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33

Future Shock: The 2012 Draft's New Rules
by
Kevin Goldstein

05-21

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20

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten Pack
by
Kevin Goldstein

05-02

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45

Future Shock: Dylan Bundy and Future No. 1 Starters
by
Kevin Goldstein

04-26

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16

Prospects Will Break Your Heart: What Could Go Wrong in 2012: Baltimore Orioles
by
Jason Parks

04-19

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24

What Scouts Are Saying: Young Pitching Edition
by
Kevin Goldstein and Ben Lindbergh

04-09

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18

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten Pack
by
Kevin Goldstein

11-15

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41

Future Shock: Baltimore Orioles Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

05-31

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28

Future Shock: Draft Notebook
by
Kevin Goldstein

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The system isn't deep, but it has flash.

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Potential Impact Rookies in 2013 (AL EAST)

When we talk about "impact" rookies, it's important to note that several rookies will be getting the call to the majors and will fail to help their team in any way, shape, or form. Coming up with a few big hits or making a couple of quality starts, however, could make a big difference at the end of a 162-game season. Here are some AL East rookies who I think can make an impact on their team's success in 2013. Click HERE for my NL East picks. 

Baltimore Orioles

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The top arm in the minors gets the call to the show. Is the teenager ready for the challenge?

The situation: The Orioles used seven relievers to throw 181 pitches in their 18-inning victory on Tuesday night. Bundy, who was slated for a few weeks of instructional league, was already on the 40-man roster, and makes the most sense for the 2012 Baltimore Orioles’ bullpen.

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August 30, 2012 5:00 am

Prospect Profile: Dylan Bundy

14

Hudson Belinsky

The Orioles' most promising prospect probably won't be bound for Baltimore this season, but regardless of when he arrives, he seems destined for the top of the O's rotation.

“Early on I just had that feeling that he was going to be a little bit more special than the others,” said Larry Turner, the head baseball coach at Owasso High School in Sperry, Oklahoma. He was reminiscing about Dylan Bundy. “The first time I saw him pitch he was probably about 10 years old,” Turner continued. “[Usually] you have some kids that were way ahead of others when they were young, and the other ones seem to catch up by the time they get to high school.” But Bundy “was the exception to the rule.”

Turner coached Bundy during his formative years, and he gives a lot of credit for Bundy’s success to the right-hander’s parents, specifically his father Denver. Dylan and his older brother Bobby, who also pitches in the Orioles’ farm system, learned the value of hard work from their father. “His work ethic is just unmatched,” Turner said of Dylan. “He’s a maniac about working out and doing everything he can to reach his potential.”

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August 15, 2012 7:33 am

Future Shock: The Bundy Dilemma

7

Kevin Goldstein

Now that Baltimore's Manny Machado is in the majors, why not Dylan Bundy?

When the Orioles promoted top positional prospect Manny Machado last week, there was a lot of debate as to whether or not the 20-year-old infielder was ready for the big leagues since he had just 928 minor league plate appearances. He's made the decision look good so far, but what is beyond debate is that the Orioles acted aggressively, which brought up the obvious question: if Machado, then why not Dylan Bundy?

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Jason tries his hand at his own top prospect list, with rankings and commentary.

It’s not that I’m against prospect rankings; it’s just that they’re not my bag. I stand in awe of those who excel at the process of these classifications, as it takes a balanced approach, one measured against the overall subjectivity of the operation. You have to look at the tools and projection, but you also have to respect and appreciate game production, with each prognosticator assigning their own weight to each variable. National writers like Kevin Goldstein, Keith Law, and Jim Callis have established their bones in this particular brand of prognostication, and I always look forward to their lists.

Last week, a Twitter question coerced me to suggest that Jurickson Profar is the top prospect in the minors, a comment that soon prompted a series of follow-up questions about the prospects who would round out my top five. I never intended to execute a formal ranking, mostly because I like to assign tools and projection more weight than I probably should, and once I fall in love with a prospect, I’m hitched for the long haul. I’m a hypocrite: I try to be as objective as possible when scouting a player, but I struggle to remove the thorns of love when it comes to ranking players against each other. Francisco Lindor was going to be in my top 10 regardless of what he did on the field in 2012. I really like Francisco Lindor, and it’s my article, and that’s my approach. Admittedly, it’s not the best approach. But I’m honest about my intentions, and I did try my best to make this more than just a prospect popularity context. As requested, here are the top 10 players in the minors, with detailed write-ups of the top five.

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June 14, 2012 9:32 am

Future Shock: Picking Pitchers

9

Kevin Goldstein

If you had to pick a pitcher for a big game tomorrow, who would you take? How about a big game in 2015? Some MLB execs weigh in with their choices.

On the surface, the question seems like an easy one: if your team were playing in a championship game tomorrow, and you could have any starting pitcher to pitch that game for you, who would it be? Your choice is of any ace in the game, but for some it's not just about statistics, it's about comfort and mitigating risk. The question was posed to 12 industry insiders, ranging from pro scout to general manager, and those twelve generated five different responses.

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These guys are so good, they cut glass. They're razor sharp.

The 2012 minor league season has lived nearly half its life, and over the course of the last two and a half months, provided us with the sensational sights, sounds, and smells of the player development machine. We follow closely to monitor the progress of the supermen of tomorrow, their triumphs celebrated and their failures analyzed in graphic detail, a highly invasive process in which we so eagerly participate. The storylines are vast highways of entertainment, often too complex to appreciate in proper detail, but tantalizing enough in their abstract form to keep us content with snapshots. The following are snapshots of the first-half, painted with a wide and often clumsy brush, as I lack the time or the tools to document the blow-by-blow accounts of the campaign with an ultra-fine point. However, along those same lines, I’m going to use quotes from one of my favorite movies in order to set the scenes of the season, and hopefully add some insight through the vehicle of entertainment. “Too many things too many things too many things... I wanna go for a walk. Let's go for a walk.”  -Amber Waves

“Start down low with a 350 cube, three and a quarter horsepower, 4-speed, 4:10 gears, ten coats of competition orange, hand-rubbed lacquer with a huplane manifold….Full f*ckin' race cams. Whoo!”

It’s only taken half of a season, but Dylan Bundy has quickly emerged as one the top prospects in the game. Seen by many as the best player available in the historically stacked 2011 draft, Bundy fell to the Orioles with the number four overall pick, and has shoved it ever since, using a plus-plus fastball, a nasty cut fastball, a curveball, and a very promising changeup to carve up the competition. In his first 11 starts in the minors, the 19-year-old native of Oklahoma has only allowed 18 hits in 45 innings pitched, sending 58 down on strikes and issuing an anemic 6 walks. “Aces” are the blue diamonds of the game, and it doesn’t take a keen scouting eye or a Rolodex full of industry sources to realize that Bundy has all the necessary characteristics to reach the lofty ceiling.

“The story sucks them in.” 

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May 23, 2012 9:14 am

Future Shock: The 2012 Draft's New Rules

33

Kevin Goldstein

This year's amateur draft will see a weaker draft class subject to new financial rules, and not everyone--Scott Boras included--thinks that's a good thing.

The general consensus is that this year is a weak draft class, especially when compared to last year's monster collection of talent. For many, the most interesting aspect to this year's draft might not be the usual who is selected by whom, but rather what happens in terms of negotiations between the picks and the teams relative to the new July 13 signing deadline. That deadline isn't the only new rule, as with assigned bonus pools, strict penalties for exceeding them, and the removal of major-league contract offerings, we're entering uncharted waters.

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May 21, 2012 1:14 pm

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten Pack

20

Kevin Goldstein

This weekend saw Trevor Bauer make his Triple-A debut, Dylan Bundy doing it again (with "it" being almost indescribable) and Tim Alderson regaining prospect status.

Tim Alderson, RHP, Pirates (Double-A Altoona)
Alderson was once a hot commodity. A first-round pick by the Giants in 2007, the six-foot-six right-hander burst onto the prospect scene by putting up a 2.79 ERA in the California League as a 19-year-old thanks to average velocity and fantastic command, but the velocity began to slip, and his career seemed to go downhill after a trade to the Pirates for Freddy Sanchez. After a six-plus ERA in 2010 and a move to the bullpen last year, he was all but off the radar. Except a funny thing happened this year, as Alderson changed his approach and took up an arm conditioning program that included long-tossing, and this spring his 85-88 mph suddenly jumped to 90-92. After dominating out of the Altoona pen, he moved to the rotation this month, and on Sunday he fired seven shutout innings while allowing just two hits and touching 93; at just 23, and after a Sunday promotion to Triple-A, he's suddenly a prospect again as a potential back-end rotation piece. 


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May 2, 2012 11:15 am

Future Shock: Dylan Bundy and Future No. 1 Starters

45

Kevin Goldstein

We talk about great pitching prospects being Future No. 1 starters, but what does that really mean?

With both Bryce Harper and Mike Trout getting the call to the big leagues recently, Dylan Bundy is now the official engineer of the Prospect Hype Train, and with good reason. He's faced 52 batters on the young season, and three have reached base, while 25 have struck out. That has prompted the inevitable questions—especially on Twitter—about whether Bundy can become a No. 1 starter. However, becoming a No. 1 starter takes more than just stuff, or more than just command; it takes something that is more than a little bit ineffable.

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People don't think much can go wrong with Dylan Bundy, but how about the rest of the top Orioles prospects?

Prospect #1: RHP Dylan Bundy
Background with Player: Industry sources
Who: The fourth overall pick in the 2011 draft, Bundy was seen by many, including Kevin Goldstein, as the best player available in the entire class, which, if you haven’t noticed, has a chance of being historically incredibl. Bundy is the rare high school draftee that arrives on the scene with a combination of now stuff and slick polish. The 19-year-old native of Oklahoma has elite upside, with all the characteristics necessary to profile as an ace. His body is strong and mature, and his delivery is clean and repeatable. His fastball can work comfortably in the mid-90s and has touched triple digits. It’s a lively offering that Bundy shows preternatural command over, not only in the ability to locate the pitch but to change speeds and vary the movement (2/4/cut). The curveball projects to be a plus offering, and those who have seen it in person rave about its shape. High school arms don’t usually enter professional ball with plus changeups for a reason, but Bundy already has a changeup that grades out at that level, and some think it could be a 7 pitch at maturity.  It’s very uncommon to find a pitcher with this combination of stuff, polish, and pitchability, and barring an unforeseen injury, Bundy looks like a future ace at the major league level. How many arms can boast that ceiling? This is a special arm.

What Could Go Wrong in 2012: We don’t know yet. Not passing the buck, but we haven’t been given a long enough look so far in 2012; Bundy is pitching with too much efficiency and having too much success, and the sample size is too small to really get a good picture of what (if any) holes exist in the skill set. It’s hard to breakdown how he will use pitch sequence multiple times through an order, or how he will respond when he doesn’t have his best stuff, or how he will respond to failure because he’s only thrown 13 innings and has crushed the competition like a major leaguer on a rehab assignment. In those 13 innings, Bundy has dropped 21 hitters on strikes, walked one, and has allowed a grand total of zero hits. The reality is that Bundy might not face a serious test until he reaches Double-A, and even then the test might be an easy one for him to pass. I’m not trying to overhype just to overhype, but there are some people in the industry who think Bundy has the necessary ingredients to pitch at the major league level this season. I can appreciate the excitement, but the developmental process is more than just finding success at your particular minor league assignment, and Bundy still has a lot to learn as a pitcher and as a person. This is going to be fun to watch over the season, and, with more looks and more innings, we will be able to paint a better picture.



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