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Articles Tagged Dusty Baker 

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10-07

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2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 301: Dusty Baker's Future and Joe Maddon's Perplexing Move/Favorite Prospects from Scout School
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

10-07

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5

Overthinking It: Dusty Baker and the Modern Manager's Survival Manual
by
Ben Lindbergh

09-19

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7

What You Need to Know: Weirdest Baseball
by
Daniel Rathman

09-11

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13

Baseball ProGUESTus: What the Insiders Say Makes a Good Manager
by
C. Trent Rosecrans

05-31

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7

On the Beat: Fireballer in the Hole
by
John Perrotto

03-28

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10

Painting the Black: Building Benches Faster
by
R.J. Anderson

05-18

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14

Painting the Black: The Evolution of Dusty Baker
by
R.J. Anderson

04-28

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25

Span and Sain and Pray for Rain: Spy vs. Spy
by
Emma Span

06-28

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32

You Could Look It Up: The Dusty Discontents (or You Must be a Cubs Fan)
by
Steven Goldman

06-25

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18

You Could Look It Up: Dusty Baker and the Johnny Oates Affair
by
Steven Goldman

04-10

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17

Under The Knife: Notes and Injuries
by
Will Carroll

02-19

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16

Team Health Reports: Cincinnati Reds
by
Will Carroll

01-21

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23

Dustying Up
by
Eric Seidman

03-09

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0

Prospectus Today: The Teflon Manager
by
Joe Sheehan

03-21

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Team Health Reports: Chicago Cubs
by
Will Carroll

03-15

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The Week in Quotes: March 8-14
by
Ryan Wilkins

10-16

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Season on the Brink
by
Rany Jazayerli

10-09

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Prospectus Today: Both Barrels Blazing
by
Joe Sheehan

07-01

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Prospectus Roundtable: Mark Prior and Pitch Counts
by
Baseball Prospectus

03-25

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Surveying the Authors
by
Baseball Prospectus

12-02

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The Week in Quotes: November 19-December 1
by
Ryan Wilkins

10-28

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The Week in Quotes: October 14-27
by
Derek Zumsteg

07-01

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The Week in Quotes: June 24-30, 2002
by
Derek Zumsteg

06-10

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The Method to Dustys Madness?
by
Steven Rubio

07-24

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Evaluating Managers
by
Steven Rubio

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Ben and Sam talk about two managers in the news, then discuss a pair of prospects Ben saw in Arizona.

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Want to stick as a 21st-century skipper? Don't be like Baker.

Dusty Baker was fired on Friday, and few Twitter tears were shed. When a manager who’s perceived to be anti-analysis gets the axe, sabermetricians celebrate. It's about time, we think. All those bunts by position players, all those illogical lineups, all those refusals to bring in the closer with a tie game on the road. We said they didn’t make sense, and someone finally listened. Maybe Bob Castellini reads blogs! Ding-dong, the Dusty era is dead. We did it!

Well…no, probably not. Most managerial hirings and firings aren’t referendums on the industry’s acceptance of sabermetrics, or the result of what anyone on the internet says. Sure, Baker was known as one of the game’s most first- and second-guessable tactical managers, and sure, he’s now out of a job. Correlation, causation, etc. Maybe Baker was let go because the Reds felt his in-game decisions and reluctance to look at certain stats were costing them wins, but it’s not the only (or even the most likely) explanation.

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September 19, 2013 6:00 am

What You Need to Know: Weirdest Baseball

7

Daniel Rathman

The Astros and Reds make many mistakes, Josh Hamilton is hitting, and Chris Davis delivers a big blow.

The Wednesday Takeaway
For all the grief we give big-league managers and players, most MLB games, even those with a couple of fielding errors or a small army stranded on base, can teach valuable lessons to Little Leaguers and young baseball minds. Every once in a while, though, a game sets the sport back so far that the only saving graces are sheer athletic prowess and a finish so late that the most impressionable fans are long in bed.

Last night’s meeting between the Reds and Astros was precisely that sort of debacle, but it wasn't until the ninth inning that the game truly began to devolve. Astros shortstop Jonathan Villar misplayed a popup that led to a Reds run in the top of the sixth, but those things happen—they’re a part of the game.


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A range of responses from players, coaches, and team executives about the most important qualities for a manager to possess.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

C. Trent Rosecrans is an all-glove, singles-hitting first baseman with 20 speed. That’s why he’s at a keyboard instead of actually playing baseball. Luckily, a complete lack of talent is more marketable in the internet world than it is in professional baseball, so he’s found a way to make some semblance of a living. Currently, it’s the CBSSports.com Eye On Baseball blog that’s paying the bills. Rosecrans was previously the Reds beat writer for the Cincinnati Post and still resides in the Queen City, waiting for Jason Parks to come sample the town’s finest chili with him. While Twitter feels so 2009, he still occasionally tweets @ctrent, but you’re just as likely to find some other silliness there as you are baseball. You can also follow him (as well as Dayn Perry and Matt Snyder) actually discussing baseball @EyeOnBaseball.
 


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Dusty Baker feels that Aroldis Chapman's best use right now is as Cincinnati's closer, and a conversation with Jesus Montero.

When Sparky Lyle strode from the bullpen the mound at Yankee Stadium during his days as a premier relief pitches in the mid- to late 1970s, organist Eddie Layton would play "Pomp and Circumstance." That probably wouldn't work as a ballpark song these days, but to hear Dusty Baker tell it, perhaps the traditional graduation accompaniment should be played on the sound system at Great American Ball Park when Reds reliever Aroldis Chapman takes the hill.

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March 28, 2012 3:00 am

Painting the Black: Building Benches Faster

10

R.J. Anderson

No more reservations over Dusty Baker's reserves.

If Baseball Prospectus tracked how often a manager spurred a column, Dusty Baker might sit atop the leaderboard. Baker, now entering his 19th season as a big-league manager, is wont to trumpet old-time truisms over newfangled concepts like OBP. You could mistake Baker for a troll if his comments weren’t so consistent and his tone so genuine. Alas, that would be too simplistic. Baker is deeper than that; deep enough where the public can identify three idiosyncrasies to him. One is that he abuses starting pitchers—which may no longer be true—and another is that he enjoys the utility and company of a sturdy toothpick, but then again, who doesn’t? That leaves the third piece of his puzzle as the most interesting: his crush on veteran ballplayers.

Baker’s run as a manager started in San Francisco. It was with the Giants that Baker eventually formed a tag team with Brian Sabean, thus bringing tears to the eyes, glee to the hearts, and dollars to the wallets of older players. Baker’s reputation for desiring older players might be exceeded only by Sabean’s. That same Sabean once had this joke made at his expense:

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Baker is a destroyer of arms no longer, despite the easy jokes you may hear at his expense.

When your manager is as fickle as a tabloid starlet with a sweet tooth for experienced men, it isn`t easy to be a semi-wild young fireballer.” – Todd Wellemeyer’s comment from Baseball Prospectus 2006.

A week or two ago, I was talking to someone about the Reds rotation and how they should proceed with deploying their depth. At one point or another, the conversation included a jab Dusty Baker’s way—something along the lines of, “Well, you need starting pitching depth when Baker is your manager.” Reputations are difficult to shake in the real world, and sometimes even tougher in the baseball world, which is why Baker’s reputation precedes him even in the present day.

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Last Friday's faceoff between Tony LaRussa and Dusty Baker could lead to a good old-fashioned managerial feud.

Compared to football, or even basketball, “manager-vs.-manager” is rarely part of the hype surrounding a baseball game. There’s not really a personality-clash equivalent of, say, Bill Belichick’s team going up against Rex Ryan's, at least not these days. There are plenty of baseball managers who are still characters—hi, Ozzie!—but relatively few who really impose their personality or style on a team in a dramatic, Billy Martin sort of way. Some run more than others, some leave pitchers in longer than others—but ultimately, over the course of a season, a manager is usually not a huge factor in a team’s success or failure.

I started thinking about this last week, when two very different dugout fixtures went up against each other more directly than is typical these days. Last Friday night, the Reds were paying the Cardinals, and with rain predicted, La Russa decided to sit scheduled starter Kyle McClellan and start the game with reliever Miguel Batista. Dusty Baker, meanwhile, had Edinson Volquez warmed up and ready to go before a two-hour pregame rain delay hit, after which he instead stuck Matt Maloney in the game. The Cardinals went on to win, 4-2.

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Further explaining to a disgruntled reader (and content thief) why Dusty Baker rarely settles on the right leadoff hitter.

Sometimes you get an email that is worth responding to not because the reader raises good points, but because he doesn’t. Such is the case with reader Greg (not a subscriber, so one of you did a copy ‘n’ paste job—c’mon, ‘fess up) and last week’s discussion of Dusty Baker’s leadoff men.

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The Reds skipper has spent the bulk of his 18-year managing career trying to find the modern-day Ralph Garr to hit atop his lineup.

It’s an affront to Managing 101: Whether you look at the batting order as a way to set up the offense or simply as a vehicle for distributing the most plate appearances to your best hitters, it has long been accepted baseball doctrine that your leadoff hitter should have a high on-base percentage. Yet, every day you can look at the box scores and see Orlando Cabrera and his .276 on-base percentage taking the first hacks of the day for Dusty Baker’s Cincinnati Reds. Drew Stubbs opened the season in the leadoff spot, occasionally yielding to Chris Dickerson, but when both started slowly, Cabrera got the nod and has been rooted at No. 1 ever since.

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April 10, 2009 12:30 pm

Under The Knife: Notes and Injuries

17

Will Carroll

Touching base with a skipper at the ballpark, plus news on a few big-name ballplayers with hurts to nurse or rehabs to make.

CINCINNATI-Clubhouses are almost all alike. With the influx of new stadiums, they're all big, roomy, and filled with TVs and comfortable chairs. The clubhouse inside of Great American Ballpark is much the same, though it feels very different without the presence of Ken Griffey Jr. and Adam Dunn, two larger-than-life personalities who had dominated that clubhouse since the place opened, even after Dusty Baker took over last season. The leather couches and chairs seem empty without those two around, and for the most part, they were.

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February 19, 2009 11:40 am

Team Health Reports: Cincinnati Reds

16

Will Carroll

Everything rides on the learning curve of a man named Dusty.

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