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Articles Tagged Drafting 

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How would the first round of the 2010 draft go down with the benefit of hindsight?

It's been just over four years since the 2010 draft, and we've gotten a good look at how that crop of highly touted amateurs has has performed in the pros. To see how much perceptions of those players have changed, we decided to do the draft over again, just as we did with the 2013 draft, the 2012 draft, and the 2011 draft. We assigned 32 picks to BP authors and re-drafted from scratch, selecting only from the pool of players who were drafted and signed in 2010 and ignoring team need. Here's how the first-round redraft shook out.

1:1 Washington Nationals
Actual Selection: Bryce Harper, OF
Draft Position Change: None
Explanation: I think there is a real case for Chris Sale at no. 1 (and I imagine there'd be one for Harvey if he wasn't hurt), but I have to stick with the chalk here. I remain firmly in the camp that sees Harper as an emerging superstar. His start hasn't been as fast as Mike Trout's, but holding anyone to that kind of standard is absolutely insane. The numbers Harper has put up at these ages are also historic, just not as monstrous. —Paul Sporer





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How would the first round of the 2011 draft go down with the benefit of hindsight?

It's been just over three years since the deep 2011 draft, and we've gotten a good look at how that crop of highly touted amateurs has has performed in the pros. To see how much perceptions of those players have changed, we decided to do the draft over again, just as we did with the 2013 draft and the 2012 draft. We assigned 32 picks to BP authors and re-drafted from scratch, selecting only from the pool of players who were drafted and signed in 2011 and ignoring team need. Here's how the first-round redraft shook out.

1:1 Pittsburgh Pirates
Actual Selection: Gerrit Cole, RHP
Re-Draft Selection: Jose Fernandez, SP, Miami Marlins (2011 no. 14 pick)
Draft Position Change: +13
Explanation: Fernandez's arsenal is downright nasty, and his pitchability is as advanced as his rapid ascent to the majors would suggest. There are always concerns about rehab from Tommy John surgery, but given his makeup I'd expect him to return to form and be one of the best arms in baseball into the next decade. —Chris Mellen





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A look at which teams have had the most hits and misses in recent drafts.

What you'd probably like to know during amateur draft week is which teams will get the most production out of the 2014 draft. Unfortunately, that's a question that we won't be able to answer for a while. So as a substitute, would you accept an examination of which teams have drafted the most (and best) major leaguers in recent years? As part of BP's partnership with Fox Sports, I attempted to answer that question (and others) in an article up today at the Fox Sports MLB page. Here's a teaser:

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How good are teams at predicting player performance in the draft?

Next week is going to be a big one for all 30 teams in Major League Baseball. It’s draft week! The Rule 4 Draft (which is the fancy name for the amateur draft) will take place from June 5th through June 7th. There will be pageantry (which is a fancy name for people trying to make a boring administrative event into a less-boring administrative event). There will be Hall of Famers representing teams. And the end result of a year of hard work by your favorite team’s scouting staff will come to fruition in the form of 30 teams making a bunch of wild guesses.

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January 15, 2013 10:43 am

Overthinking It: Have the Twins Learned to Love the Strikeout?

5

Ben Lindbergh

Pour one out for Brad Radke and his spiritual descendants.

We don't typically think of particular player types as being associated with certain teams. There are some exceptions that seem to persist over time: the Rockies go after groundballers, for instance, and the Yankees tend to target lefty-swinging sluggers. But those teams' player preferences are tied to their ballparks. If the Rockies played at a lower altitude or the Yankees found they could fit in another luxury box by making their outfield fences more symmetrical, they would adapt to their new surroundings and stop pursuing the same sort of player.

Other apparent preferences are illusions or short-term trends based on temporary team composition or the whims of one front-office regime. The A’s, for a while, liked fat guys, but then they discovered defense. The Royals, under Dayton Moore, have a thing for former Braves. The Tigers, under Dave Dombrowski and scouting director David Chadd, have a reputation for liking big pitchers who throw hard. But that’s almost an obvious affinity, sort of like saying a team favors hitters who hit the ball far. The Tigers might like pitchers who throw hard a little more than most teams, and they might be a bit more willing to overlook the shortcomings of pitchers who fit that profile. But what team doesn’t like big pitchers who throw hard?

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The Reds have the lowest payroll of any first-place team, in large part because they haven't had to reach outside the organization for talent. Can they keep it up?

Well, homegrown’s all right with me
Homegrown is the way it should be
Homegrown is a good thing
Plant that bell and let it ring.

-Neil Young, “Homegrown”

Take a look at the Reds’ lineup from last night:





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In part two, Rany examines just how important age is for a draft pick.

Yesterday’s column made the claim that small differences in age among high school hitters can have a dramatic impact on their return as draft picks. Today, I intend to prove that claim.

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June 4, 2010 9:00 am

Ahead in the Count: No Turnover Standings Breakdown

12

Matt Swartz

Putting every major-league player back with his original team in an alternative universe can tell us a lot about team building.

In March, I introduced The No Turnover Standings which measured what teams’ records would have been if Major League Baseball did not allow any player movement and all players had provided the same production for the team that originally drafted or signed them as amateurs.  As I described in that article:

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March 15, 2010 12:31 pm

Ahead in the Count: The No Turnover Standings

26

Matt Swartz

What would happen if players had to stay with the teams who originally drafted or signed them as amateurs?

"Loyalty to any one sports team is pretty hard to justify because the players are always changing, the team can move to another city, you're actually rooting for the clothes when you get right down to it. You know what I mean? You are standing and cheering and yelling for your clothes to beat the clothes from another city. Fans will be so in love with a player, but if he goes to another team, they boo him. This is the same human being in a different shirt! They hate him now! Boo! Different shirt!! Boo!"

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November 6, 2008 11:58 am

Fantasy Beat: To Save or Not to Save

12

Marc Normandin

The tricky task of predicting the value and utility of non-closing relief pitchers.

The last time we ran this column, I discussed writing a few pieces over the offseason to examine different strategies and approaches for getting the most out of relief pitchers for your fantasy team. Today we'll take a look at how valuable non-closer relievers can be, as they are often neglected in leagues without statistical categories specific to them, such as holds.

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September 24, 2008 11:36 am

Fantasy Beat: Sweet Relief

8

Marc Normandin

Finding it is fleeting, which suggests strategies for when and who to draft.

Drafting the right relievers presents an annual problem for fantasy owners. Sure, you can always take a look at their saves totals-or holds, if that's part of the game in your league-but this often ends with a few owners getting the shaft and drafting closers who have poor peripherals that drag down their other categories, just for the sake of picking up extra saves. If you overdraft for a guy guaranteed to get you saves rather than some of the poorer options that are picked up towards the back end of the draft, you may miss out on important contributors elsewhere. Today we're going to run a little exercise using WXRL, in order to see how often top relievers replicate their success, and whether it is worth it or not for you to spend (or waste) high draft picks on them.

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April 21, 2008 12:00 am

BP Kings Preview

0

Ben Murphy

BP's Fantasy Scoresheet League is back for another year. Today, the participants outline their strategies and draft results.

Despite that snafu, I'm pretty happy with the end result of my team. I have a better pitching staff than last year, and a number of good prospects getting closer to being able to help me. And since I'm not in Nate's division, I'll have an opportunity to contend.


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