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Articles Tagged Doug Pappas 

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Maury talks about a revered colleague and friend on the anniversary of a tragic loss.

There are days in all of our lives that we'd like to forget, days we wished had not happened. Days that place matters in perspective. Today is the anniversary of one of those days. And while we might have been talking the sale of the Braves, or owners approving the deal for MLB Extra Innings and the MLB Network, today is reserved for something more important.

Three years ago today, the baseball research community was hit by shocking news: Doug Pappas, the founder of SABR's Business of Baseball committee and an author for Baseball Prospectus, had died. The circumstances of his death seemed unbelievable-he died of heat prostration while vacationing at Big Bend National Park in Texas. It didn't sound right. "What? Doug is dead? He died how?!?" Emails, phone calls, message boards, and blogs spread the news. Doug's own blog became a point where many met to leave final words of thanks and well-wishes. At 41, one of the most respected and prodigious baseball researchers was gone.

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I found out about Doug Pappas' tragic passing on Friday. There were phone messages on both my cell phone and home phone from a number of people, all with a more serious tone to their voices than you'd really like to hear. None of the people actually left the momentous news, but rather some version of "Give me a call the second you get this message." Moments later, I checked my e-mail, and a barrage of messages with the header "Sad News" scrolled up my screen. Doug Pappas had passed away. My friend, a colleague for whom I have immense respect, and all-around good guy, had departed from us too soon. My initial response was the same during those horrid times when another friend had died; it sounds strange, but my first impulse is to give him a call and find out what was really going on. It can't be right, you know? This has got to be some sort of misunderstanding, right? Doug's only 43, in good health, and a standup guy. Must be someone else. There's definitely a big ball of confusion out there, and this is completely out of left field. I felt like someone had kicked me in the stomach and stolen the air from the room, but I knew it was a mistake. Had to be. It wasn't. And we are all diminished because of it. Doug's particular chosen role was a particularly difficult one--to call the powerful on the inaccuracy or dishonesty of their public statements. That's not easy. Over the years, Doug came out and publicly pointed out the inaccuracies, contradictions, and misleading nature of Major League Baseball's financial disclosures. He did his homework, explained his position, made sure that the MLB functionary's agenda was understood by the public, and stood by his work. It was an often thankless and misunderstood role, but the public interest was well served because Doug was willing to vigorously undertake it.

Doug Pappas had passed away. My friend, a colleague for whom I have immense respect, and all-around good guy, had departed from us too soon. My initial response was the same during those horrid times when another friend had died; it sounds strange, but my first impulse is to give him a call and find out what was really going on. It can't be right, you know? This has got to be some sort of misunderstanding, right? Doug's only 43, in good health, and a standup guy. Must be someone else. There's definitely a big ball of confusion out there, and this is completely out of left field. I felt like someone had kicked me in the stomach and stolen the air from the room, but I knew it was a mistake. Had to be.

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Three days after first getting the news of it, the death of Doug Pappas seems no more real than it did on Friday. I know that denial is a stage of grief, but it's easy to get stuck there when you find your friend quoted in the paper, as Doug was in yesterday's Denver Post, the words from an interview conducted well before his passing. That Doug would be sharing knowledge even after his death is appropriate. The man is gone, and we're all less for that loss, but what remains, what will remain, is his amazing work. From his efforts as part of the Society for American Baseball Research to his writing for Baseball Prospectus to his nascent Weblog, Doug spent much of his life sharing knowledge with others. Without fanfare, every day Doug made the world a little smarter, a little better, and did so for nothing more than the fact that he enjoyed it.

That Doug would be sharing knowledge even after his death is appropriate. The man is gone, and we're all less for that loss, but what remains, what will remain, is his amazing work. From his efforts as part of the Society for American Baseball Research to his writing for Baseball Prospectus to his nascent Weblog, Doug spent much of his life sharing knowledge with others. Without fanfare, every day Doug made the world a little smarter, a little better, and did so for nothing more than the fact that he enjoyed it.

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For the following survey, 13 members of the Baseball Prospectus staff submitted their predictions in time for publication, covering--among other things--divisional standings and end-of-season awards.

National League

National League East

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Well, it's that time of year again--the time for Baseball Prospectus authors to emerge from out of their respective caves, and provide readers with further evidence that they know absolutely nothing about this game they call "base ball." In other words, it's time for the annual set of Preseason Predictions. For this survey, 13 members of the Baseball Prospectus staff submitted their predictions in time for publication, covering--among other things--divisional standings, postseason standings, and end-of-season awards. Later this week, a Roundtable discussion will run in this space, discussing the predictions seen below, and probably a bunch of other topics as well. Enjoy.

For this survey, 13 members of the Baseball Prospectus staff submitted their predictions in time for publication, covering--among other things--divisional standings, postseason standings, and end-of-season awards. Later this week, a Roundtable discussion will run in this space, discussing the predictions seen below, and probably a bunch of other topics as well. Enjoy.

National League

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March 4, 2003 12:00 am

Surveying the Authors

0

Doug Pappas

For the past seven years, I've surveyed the members of the Society For American Baseball Research's Business of Baseball Committee about issues relating to baseball labor and economics, publishing the results and a cross-section of the comments in the winter issue of the Committee's quarterly newsletter. With a new CBA in place and the Expos still in limbo, I decided to survey my fellow Prospectus writers, too. Unlike the usual Prospectus roundtable, no one saw or commented on anyone else's answers. BP writers who responded to the survey included Jeffrey Bower, Will Carroll, Gary Huckabay, Rany Jazayerli, Jonah Keri, Doug Pappas, Joe Sheehan, Nate Silver and Derek Zumsteg. As you'll see, our views are far from monolithic.

BP writers who responded to the survey included Jeffrey Bower, Will Carroll, Gary Huckabay, Rany Jazayerli, Jonah Keri, Doug Pappas, Joe Sheehan, Nate Silver and Derek Zumsteg. As you'll see, our views are far from monolithic.

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There is simply no perfect spring day that Bud Selig can't ruin.

There is simply no perfect spring day that Bud Selig can't ruin.

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