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Articles Tagged Don Mattingly 

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10-30

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2

Transaction Analysis: Green Is The New Black
by
R.J. Anderson

10-23

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0

Transaction Analysis: Darkest Before The Don
by
R.J. Anderson

01-07

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5

Rumor Roundup: Which Teams Are in on Tanaka?
by
Daniel Rathman

10-12

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16

Playoff Prospectus: NLCS Game One Recap: Cardinals 3, Dodgers 2
by
Ben Lindbergh

05-23

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3

What You Need to Know: Dodging Bullets
by
Will Woods

05-23

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0

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 209: Veterans vs. Young Players/The Dodgers and Grit
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

09-05

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7

The Platoon Advantage: Shaving an Icon
by
Michael Bates

06-22

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1

What You Need to Know: Friday, June 22
by
Daniel Rathman

05-11

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15

Prospectus Hit and Run: Donnie Buntball
by
Jay Jaffe

05-10

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21

Inside The Park: Can Teams Protect Their Pitchers?
by
Bradford Doolittle

04-10

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6

Western Front: It Only Seems Like the Suburbs
by
Geoff Young

12-28

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42

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The First Basemen
by
Jay Jaffe

06-20

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1

The Week in Quotes: June 13-19
by
Alex Carnevale

05-25

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17

The BP Broadside: The Annotated WARP Leaders II: Did Ernie Banks Write the Book of Love?
by
Steven Goldman

05-11

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4

On the Beat: Dodger Dilemma
by
John Perrotto

03-21

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9

On the Beat: Donnie Manager
by
John Perrotto

02-11

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9

Wezen-Ball: BP Odds & Ends
by
Larry Granillo

02-10

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6

Purpose Pitches: Farrell, Mattingly, and Roenicke
by
Christina Kahrl

01-18

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4

On the Beat: Warming up on the North Side
by
John Perrotto

01-14

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3

Prospectus Q&A: J.T. Snow
by
David Laurila

12-23

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2011: Bagwell and Baggage
by
Jay Jaffe

09-27

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0

The Week in Quotes: September 20-26
by
Alex Carnevale

09-20

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9

On the Beat: Being Part of the Solution
by
John Perrotto

08-13

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8

Prospectus Q&A: On Trammell and Whitaker
by
David Laurila

07-23

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10

On the Beat: Why is it The Year of The Pitcher?
by
John Perrotto

07-14

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13

You Could Look It Up: Steinbrenner: Baseball Operator
by
Steven Goldman

04-04

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3

Prospectus Q&A: Buck Showalter
by
David Laurila

11-09

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0

Prospectus Today: Bronx Mayhem
by
Joe Sheehan

10-08

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0

The Week in Quotes: October 1-7
by
Alex Carnevale

02-27

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0

Prospectus Today: Gold Gloves in February
by
Joe Sheehan

01-09

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0

Prospectus Today: The Conundrum
by
Joe Sheehan

12-13

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The Class of 2007
by
Jay Jaffe

06-12

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The Week in Quotes: June 5-11
by
John Erhardt

01-09

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0

Prospectus Today: The Ballot
by
Joe Sheehan

12-16

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The Class of 2005
by
Jay Jaffe

04-05

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0

You Could Look It Up: Backlash
by
Steven Goldman

02-24

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0

Prospectus Roundtable: Top 50 Prospects, Part IV
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-22

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0

Prospectus Roundtable: Top 50 Prospects, Part II
by
Baseball Prospectus

01-06

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0

The Class of 2004
by
Jay Jaffe

01-05

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0

2004 Internet Hall of Fame
by
Neal Traven

12-04

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0

One Man's Ballot
by
Keith Woolner

11-30

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0

Hall Of Fame Roundtable
by
Christina Kahrl and Gary Huckabay

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July 23, 2010 8:00 am

On the Beat: Why is it The Year of The Pitcher?

10

John Perrotto

Various star players weigh in on why they think pitching is back in vogue in the major leagues.

The 2010 season has been the "Year of the Pitcher." How do we know this to be true? Because seemingly everyone connected to baseball says it is. National magazines run cover stories saying this is the Year of the Pitcher. National television broadcasters say it, too. And so do many of the players.

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July 14, 2010 8:00 am

You Could Look It Up: Steinbrenner: Baseball Operator

13

Steven Goldman

The Boss could be many things, both good and bad, but no owner ever cared more about winning.

In last night’s chat, I wrote that George Steinbrenner was a tyrant who could be arbitrarily generous or a generous man who could be arbitrarily tyrannical. Google up all of the thousands of words that have been written about the man since Tuesday morning and you will see variations of that thought, his dual nature referenced again and again. As Charles Dickens might have written, he was the best of guys, he was the worst of guys. When a man’s life is measured, which should count for more, his best moments or his worst? There is no easy way to answer this question, lest we go down some Citizen Kane-like road of exploration of the many facets of the man, and even that, as Orson Welles skillfully showed, is a journey that is inevitably inconclusive. My own personal view of morality is that cruelty is cheap, especially when those who suffer the blows cannot strike back because they are in some way our subordinates. Anonymous charity does not excuse, erase, or offset capricious cruelty. It merely sits alongside it, a parallel column of good behavior that cannot bleach sin. Redemption, reschemnshion—this ain’t football, and the penalties don’t offset.

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A conversation about analysis and the game with the former skipper and present-day talking head.

Buck Showalter is in many ways an old-school baseball man, but that doesn’t mean the former Yankees, Diamondbacks, and Rangers skipper doesn‘t value data -- or that he hasn’t for more than three decades. He unmistakably understands the mechanics of the game. Currently an analyst for ESPN, Showalter offered his thoughts on a variety of subjects, including how the game has (and hasn’t) changed, why Paul O’Neill could hit southpaws, why switch-sliders make good switch-hitters, and what makes the Twins the Twins.

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November 9, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Bronx Mayhem

0

Joe Sheehan

Back from jetting around, Joe settles back into discussing a subject closer to home.

I honestly don't know how beat writers and others who travel frequently do it. Perhaps it wouldn't have been a big deal to me in my twenties, or at least if I'd started then, but the travel of the last two weeks took a lot out of me. From New York to Boston to Denver to New York to Phoenix, I didn't spend more than three days in any bed, racking up about 8000 air miles, a couple hundred more by train, and an encyclopedic knowledge of how Expedia and Hotwire work.

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The usual freakouts in the Big Apple, some solid confidence in Boston, and the rest of the notable quotables from around baseball.

AN OCTOBER TRADITION

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February 27, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Gold Gloves in February

0

Joe Sheehan

The all-time Gold Glove voting is underway.

Clay Davenport sent me reams of data on the best fielders in the Gold Glove era. Clay's defensive ratings, which account for context better than any other, are the best non-play-by-play metrics extant, and they formed the basis for most of my balloting. Where I needed more information, such as when I had to fill out more ballot spots than were covered by Clay's data, I tended towards selecting players of recent vintage, whose excellence I can support with performance data, observational evidence and a greater understanding of their reputation.

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As Hall of Fame campaigns for the Mattinglys and Concepcions of the world rage on, there's no shame in being a part of the Hall of Very Good.

So take this seriously, because if I can make this statement, it is completely true: Don Mattingly is not a Hall of Famer.

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December 13, 2006 12:00 am

The Class of 2007

0

Jay Jaffe

One candidate is different from every other candidate, but that doesn't mean that the rest of the infielders on the ballot have no hope of induction. Jay uses his signature JAWS system to investigate who's worthy of Cooperstown.

This is the fourth year I've used the very self-consciously named Jaffe WARP Score system (JAWS) to examine the Hall of Fame ballot. The goal of JAWS is to identify candidates on the Hall ballot who are as good or better than the average Hall of Famer at their position, a bar set so as to avoid further diluting the quality of the institution's membership. Clay Davenport's Wins Above Replacement Player (WARP) totals are the coin of the realm for this endeavor because they normalize all performance records in major-league history to the same scoring environment, adjusting for park effects, quality of competition and length of schedule. Pitchers, hitters and fielders are thus rated above or below one consistent replacement level, making cross-era comparisons a breeze.

JAWS does not include non-statistical considerations--awards, championships, postseason performance, rap sheet, urine test results--but that's not to say they should be left by the wayside. They're just not the focus here. While I'll discuss the 800-pound elephant in the room in the context of various candidacies, I don't claim to have a solution as to how voters or fans should handle the dawn of this new era. That's an emotional issue, and JAWS isn't designed to handle emotions.

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Who knew that Jason Grimsley would be the star for an entire week of news cycles? We get a few perspectives on his situation, plus a look at managing and the effects of struggling.

"I am deeply saddened whenever there is an allegation that a Major League Baseball player is involved in the use of performance-enhancing substances. Because this is an ongoing criminal investigation, I will not make any comment about this specific case. As a general matter, however, I urge everyone associated with Major League Baseball--from the players to the union to the owners--to cooperate with the ongoing investigations by the Federal government and by former Senator George Mitchell."
--MLB Commissioner Bud Selig, responding to the Grimsley situation (MLB.com)

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January 9, 2006 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: The Ballot

0

Joe Sheehan

With the election results to be announced tomorrow, Joe looks at who should go into the Hall of Fame--and who will.

Of the 14 new candidates, at least 10 are probably making their only appearance. Rick Aguilera, Gary DiSarcina, Alex Fernandez, Gary Gaetti, Ozzie Guillen, Gregg Jefferies, Doug Jones, Hal Morris, Walt Weiss and John Wetteland all had prominent places in the game in their time, winning awards, making All-Star teams and contributing to championships. None, however, even passes the sniff test for Hall of Fame consideration. Their inclusion on this ballot is an honor unto itself, one that will likely serve as the sole coda to their playing careers.

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December 16, 2004 12:00 am

The Class of 2005

0

Jay Jaffe

There are 16 position players on the Hall of Fame ballot. Jay Jaffe thinks three of them belong in Cooperstown.

These new metrics enable us to identify candidates who are as good or better than the average Hall of Famer at their position. By promoting those players for election, we can avoid further diluting the quality of the Hall's membership. Clay Davenport's Translations make an ideal tool for this endeavor because they normalize all performance records in major-league history to the same scoring environment, adjusting for park effects, quality of competition and length of schedule. All pitchers, hitters and fielders are thus rated above or below one consistent replacement level, making cross-era comparisons a breeze. Though non-statistical considerations--awards, championships, postseason performance--shouldn't be left by the wayside in weighing a player's Hall of Fame case, they're not the focus here.

Since election to the Hall of Fame requires a player to perform both at a very high level and for a long time, it's inappropriate to rely simply on career Wins Above Replacement (WARP, which for this exercise refers exclusively to the adjusted-for-all-time version. WARP3). For this process I also identified each player's peak value as determined by the player's WARP in his best five consecutive seasons (with allowances made for seasons lost to war or injury). That choice is an admittedly arbitrary one; I simply selected a peak vaue that was relatively easy to calculate and that, at five years, represented a minimum of half the career of a Hall of Famer.

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Statistics are a tool, not unlike a microscope. Statistics are a hammer, a speculum, a thermometer. A statistics-based approach to understanding of baseball is one of many paths to knowledge of the game. Calling those who take that path "freaks" or "Nazis" makes as much sense as calling a Ph.D. chemist a wimp because he tests the qualities of his cyanide compound by means of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy rather than just drinking the thing.

In 1937, George and Ira Gershwin wrote a song for the Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers picture Shall We Dance that was an instant classic satire of the human need to scoff at the merest hint of progress:

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