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The latest on the longest season-starting walkless streaks.

It’s appropriate that Jeff Keppinger’s first walk of 2013 was a game-winner. After 140 plate appearances without one—150 dating back to the end of last season—it would’ve been a shame if the walk we’d all been waiting for hadn’t helped the White Sox win.

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Did Bryce Harper see reason, or has he misplaced his magic necklace? With an update on the DiSars!

These are simply three unrelated items that should be in the public record somewhere.

1. Monday, I wrote about Bryce Harper’s toughest at-bats. One was against Kenley Jansen, in late April, and another was against Jonny Venters, in late May. In the first one, Bryce Harper was wearing a Phiten magic necklace, and in the second one he was not. Somewhere between late April and late May, Bryce Harper either realized magic necklaces aren’t real, or he decided that they are real but they don’t work on his particular body chemistry, or he lost his. Magic necklaces obviously are real, and they obviously do work, no duh, or else why would all these athletes (and bat boys, and managers, and fans) wear them? I know what you’re probably going to say, but let me reiterate: Uh no duh.

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Bringing back the DiSar Awards to celebrate the achievements of those players who believe there's no such thing as a free pass.

Among the many oddities of the pre-sabermetric period—or at least the time before sabermetrics went mainstream—is replacement-level shortstop Gary DiSarcina’s 12-year career, most of which he spent as a starter. That’s not to say that teams no longer make mistakes in a more enlightened era—they do, and plenty of them—but one wonders whether DiSarcina would have enjoyed the long leash he did had his every on-field failure been scrutinized by an army of online (and front-office) observers wielding advanced statistics.

Of course, it wasn’t as if more simplistic stats built DiSarcina into a Joe Carter-like false idol–one didn’t need to see his career .225 TAv and negative FRAA to know that he wasn’t among the game’s leading lights. Still, something kept him employed, year after year and out after out. Few players spend the entirety of a lengthy career with the same team, and those who do tend to be marketable stars, men whose fates gradually become intertwined with those of their franchises through sustained mutual success. DiSarcina was not one of those men, but he was a career Angel in spite of all efforts to play his way out of a job.

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May 19, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: DiSar Winners and Leaders

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Joe Sheehan

Recognizing the hack-masters with the flash and thunder to avoid taking a free pass.

Way back in 1998, Angels shortstop Gary DiSarcina opened the season by going 61 plate appearances—the better part of April—before drawing his first walk. Towards the end of that stretch, he was quoted as saying he would be perfectly happy if he never drew one, which was consistent with his career approach, as he drew just 154 free passes in more than 4000 career plate appearances.

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As in the AL, the Central division is as tight as can be, while in the East two Mets are predicted to take home some hardware along with their division flag.

Today we reveal the Baseball Prospectus staff predictions for the division standings and the major player awards (MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year) in the National League, along with the staff picks in some fun miscellaneous categories.

Each staff member's division standings predictions may be found later in the article. Here, we present a wisdom-of-the-crowds summary of the results. In each table you'll find the average rank of each team in their division, plus the results of our pre-season MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year voting.

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April 26, 2005 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: The DiSars Are Back!

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Joe Sheehan

For the second straight season, the DiSar Awards went to players who weren't regulars.

For those of you new to this space, the DiSar Awards are named in tribute to former Angels shortstop Gary DiSarcina who, bless him, once said that he had a goal of going through an entire season without drawing a walk. DiSarcina has left the field, but the DiSars live on to honor that notion, going to the position player in each league who goes the deepest into his season without hearing the words, "Take your base!"

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March 9, 2004 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: The 2004 DiSars

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Joe Sheehan

One of the many cool things about this gig is knowing that you've introduced concepts that are going to be around for a very long time. For people like Michael Wolverton, Clay Davenport and Keith Woolner, it has to be greatly rewarding to have invented metrics that likely will be used by not just the next generation of baseball fans, but the ones to follow them. To create something both useful and enduring is one way to leave a mark, however small, on the world. Me? I'm no SuperGenius (man, I miss Calvin) like those guys. To the extent that I've brought anything into the baseball world, it's the second-best BP thing to ever be named after a mediocre middle infielder. I'm talking about The DiSar Awards, now five years old and still honoring the best and brightest in the field of swinging at everything. The awards are named in tribute to former Angels shortstop Gary DiSarcina, who once remarked that he wanted to go an entire season without walking, and who finished his career with 154 free passes in 12 years and 3,744 at-bats.

Me? I'm no SuperGenius (man, I miss Calvin) like those guys. To the extent that I've brought anything into the baseball world, it's the second-best BP thing to ever be named after a mediocre middle infielder.

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April 7, 2003 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Small Sample Size Tzuris

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Joe Sheehan

For the second time in five days, Joe Sheehan explores the options available to a team losing a star to a dislocated shoulder. Plus, the Disar Awards return!

Organizations regularly ignore this basic tenet. A six-game losing streak that makes a team 36-46 will be unpleasant; if it makes a team 0-6, it can get people fired. Hell, sometimes reasonably intelligent columnists will forget this, and write about how the first three games of the season indicate that the Braves' offense could be a real problem, just in time for them to score 26 runs over the weekend.

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