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Articles Tagged Dimensions 

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The Marlins' position players are fed up by their ballpark's dimensions, and Ozzie Guillen is fed up with them. Who's making the most sense

After my last Bill Veeck blowout, I planned to leave my copy of Veeck as in Wreck alone for a while, but current events keep making me pull it back off the shelf. This time, the impetus was Ozzie Guillen's recent complaints about his players' complaints about the dimensions of Marlins Park.

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The Duke of Flatbush departs the stage, but not without leaving his mark on the game, a city, and an era.

On Sunday, the baseball world learned of the passing of Duke Snider, who made his name for the Brooklyn Dodgers at a time when New York was the center of the baseball world, with its three teams each boasting a future Hall of Fame center fielder. "Snider, Mantle, and Mays," wrote the great Red Smith. "You could get a fat lip in any saloon by starting an argument as to which was best.”

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PITCHf/x data can shed light on pitchers' throwing mechanics.

Pitcher Release Points

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August 26, 2009 12:26 pm

You Could Look It Up: Don't Fence Me In

13

Steven Goldman

Griping over New Yankee Stadium inspires a trip to review the virtues of a Coliseum of yore.

Writing recently in Pinstriped Bible, I dismissed those who would condemn the offensive generosity of the new Yankee Stadium, saying:

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March 30, 2009 11:54 am

Fantasy Beat: To the Warning Track

19

Marc Normandin

A player whose power is tamped down by the faraway walls of Petco.

Last week we took a look at how the wind and his home park affected Kevin Youkilis' home-run production in 2008. Youkilis is an example of a player who is being overrated due to some homers receiving a boost from those factors, but it can work both ways; there are also players who are underrated due to these same effects holding their power numbers down, and this time out we'll take a look at one of them.

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October 30, 2007 12:00 am

Prospectus Toolbox: Mailbag at Altitude

0

Derek Jacques

The puzzle of park effects led to a flurry of reader emails.

I received a decent number of questions about my park effects piece from last week, so I think it's worthwhile to spend one more column rooting through the mailbag and discussing a few loose ends. The extremely short World Series-indeed, the extremely short postseason, with seven series played in just four games over the minimum-has taken some of the urgency out of the long-delayed umpire discussion.

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September 28, 2006 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: Baseball's Trifecta

0

Dan Fox

Where have all the triples gone? Dan investigates.

"Hey, big mouth, how do you spell triple?"
--Shoeless Joe Jackson, to a heckling Cleveland fan who taunted him by asking if he could spell "illiterate." This was his response after hitting a triple.

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February 10, 2005 12:00 am

Crooked Numbers: More Time in the Park

0

James Click

Two hypotheses down, one to go: James Click tries again to divine truth from park factors.

Last week was spent checking to see if groundball pitchers were less affected by park factors than flyball pitchers are, a theory based on the assumption that park factors are based largely on outfield dimensions. This turned out not to be the case. Months before that was a little foray into park factors and baserunning attempt and success rates, checking to see if perhaps home teams got some of their inherent advantage from knowing how the ball bounces in their yard better than their visiting opponents do. Again, the theory did not pan out.

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April 22, 2004 12:00 am

Hank Aaron's Home Cooking

0

Jay Jaffe

It's been a couple of weeks since the 30th anniversary of Hank Aaron's historic 715th home run and the accompanying tributes, but Barry Bonds' exploits tend to keep the top of the all-time chart in the news. With homers in seven straight games and counting at this writing, Bonds has blown past Willie Mays at number three like the Say Hey Kid was standing still, which--

Baseball Prospectus' Dayn Perry penned an affectionate tribute to Aaron last week. In reviewing Hammerin' Hank's history, he notes that Aaron's superficially declining stats in 1968 (the Year of the Pitcher, not coincidentally) led him to consider retirement, but that historian Lee Allen reminded him of the milestones which lay ahead. Two years later, Aaron became the first black player to cross the 3,000 hit threshold, two months ahead of Mays. By then he was chasing 600 homers and climbing into some rarefied air among the top power hitters of all time.

Aaron produced plenty of late-career homer heroics after 1968. From ages 35 (1969) through 39, he smacked 203 dingers, and he added another 42 in his 40s, meaning that nearly a third of his homers (32.4 percent) came after age 35. The only batters other than Aaron to top 200 homers after 35 are Bonds and Rafael Palmeiro.

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April 11, 2003 12:00 am

Breaking Balls: Environmental Control

0

Derek Zumsteg

Some time ago, I wrote a column on a few of the new ballparks, and using the available evidence on their dimensions, speculated on how they'd play. In response to that column, I got a particularly cool question from a number of different readers. That is: "What would the best pitchers' park look like?" I love the questions that stick in your craw. How far back do you push the fences before today's home runs and many line drives become inside-the-park four-sackers, for instance? In order to answer this question, I took the liberty of persuing our list of historical park factors, and did some sorting, some grouping, and some determining of thresholds.

I love the questions that stick in your craw. How far back do you push the fences before today's home runs and many line drives become inside-the-park four-sackers, for instance?

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February 4, 2002 1:43 pm

Breaking Balls: Breaking Balls: MLB Cribs

0

Derek Zumsteg

In the National League, now that it appears the Cardinals are on their way to having a privately-constructed stadium, only the Marlins and Mets remain in older stadiums that beg to be torn down. The Marlins are in the same boat as the Devil Rays, in that they stink and have bad relationships with local political powers. And the Mets? Sure, the Yankees and Mets would both like new stadiums, but the sheer cost and difficulties associated with getting that kind of project underway makes it unlikely. After the two parks open in 2004, there's one new stadium coming in St. Louis and then it would seem we're not going to see anything else for a long while. A more interesting question: Will these new, baseball-only stadiums have the lifespan that their multi-use parents did, or will they last as long as the old parks like Fenway and Wrigley Field, the models these new kids looked to for inspiration?

 The Reds are moving stadiums for 2003, and two teams may have new digs for 2004. The Reds are headed into the Great American Ball Park, where walking onto the field will get you fired.

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January 29, 2002 12:00 am

Japanese Baseball

0

Clay Davenport

More serious a problem is the small number of players moving between Japan and the United States. The Translations system depends on being able to set a difficulty level for each league. To do that, I need to have a sizable group of players who have played in both the leagues I am testing and in leagues whose difficulty level I already know. Every player who played in both leagues needs to be compared to the league average; if, as a group, one set is league average, and the second set is 10% above average, you can assume that the second league is 10% worse that the first league.

With the Japanese leagues, there really haven't been enough comparisons to get a firm grip on the appropriate difficulty level, especially since almost all the comparisons were of players who went from the U.S. to Japan, and not from Japan to the U.S..

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