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Articles Tagged Detroit Tigers 

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09-13

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5

Let It Eat: The Last Night of the Tigers Dynasty That Wasn't
by
Ben Carsley

09-04

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Transaction Analysis: Justin Time (Part 1)
by
Bryan Grosnick and Jarrett Seidler

09-04

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Transaction Analysis: Justin Time (Part 2)
by
Bryan Grosnick, Victor Filoromo, Emmett Rosenbaum and Jeffrey Paternostro

09-02

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DFA Podcast: Ep. 27: Justin Time!
by
Bryan Grosnick, R.J. Anderson and Shawn Brody

08-30

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Rubbing Mud: Which Stripes Do You Switch?
by
Matthew Trueblood

08-25

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2

Rubbing Mud: Are You Ready for the Fallout?
by
Matthew Trueblood

08-01

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Transaction Analysis: Avila Trades Avila (and Wilson)
by
Zack Moser, Eric Roseberry and Emmett Rosenbaum

07-26

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4

The View From Behind The Backstop: If You Prefer A Milder Prospect Writer, Please Ask For One
by
Jeffrey Paternostro

07-20

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4

The GM Trade Game
by
Russell A. Carleton and BP Staff

07-19

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0

DFA Podcast: Ep. 17: Gotta Start Somewhere
by
Bryan Grosnick, Ben Diamond and Shawn Brody

07-19

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Transaction Analysis: JD to AZ
by
Wilson Karaman, Stacey Gotsulias, Mark Anderson and George Bissell

07-11

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1

Deep, But Playable: Almost Always Counts (Emotionally)
by
Craig Goldstein

05-22

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2

Flu-Like Symptoms: Detroit's Earthworm Preservation Society
by
Rob Mains

05-15

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Flu-Like Symptoms: The Worst Bullpen in Baseball
by
Rob Mains

03-29

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1

Short Relief: Spring Dismissals, Veteran Expletives, and JaCobies Jones
by
James Fegan, Nathan Bishop and Patrick Dubuque

03-23

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1

Short Relief: Playing the Right Way, Baserunning the Wrong Way, and Pitching the Rockies Way
by
David Temple, Mo Bjonski and Zack Moser

03-16

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6

Short Relief: Disputing Crash, Remembering Bonderman, and Forgetting Pham
by
Zack Moser, David Temple and James Fegan

03-15

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1

Looking Back on Tomorrow: Detroit Tigers
by
Bryan Grosnick

01-26

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3

Transaction Analysis: Need You To Need Me
by
Bryan Grosnick

01-06

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0

Transaction Analysis: Post-Christmas Shopping
by
Matthew Trueblood, Jared Wyllys and Brendan Gawlowski

09-02

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0

Prospect Profile: Spencer Turnbull
by
Jessica Quiroli

08-31

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0

The Call-Up: JaCoby Jones
by
Mark Anderson and Scooter Hotz

08-17

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Transaction Analysis: Tigers Add Iglesias Insurance
by
Bryan Grosnick and Christopher Crawford

08-08

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What You Need to Know: We're Not in Asgaard Anymore
by
Ashley Varela

08-04

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2

What You Need to Know: Everybody's Walk-Off Wild Pitching
by
Demetrius Bell

07-13

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4

Two-Strike Approach: The Curse That Keeps Giving
by
Cat Garcia

07-06

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4

Rubbing Mud: The Tigers Should Go For It
by
Matthew Trueblood

06-27

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1

What You Need to Know: Sometimes You Win, Sometimes You Hit Seven Homers and Lose
by
Ashley Varela

06-23

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Prospectus Feature: The Increasingly Lopsided Everybody-Wins Trade
by
Aaron Gleeman

06-13

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What You Need to Know: Nothing Left to Do But Win
by
Ashley Varela

06-07

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3

Prospectus Feature: From a Cesspool, Success
by
Aaron Gleeman

06-03

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Transaction Analysis: Just A Guy(s)
by
Bryan Grosnick

05-17

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5

What You Need to Know: Jose Berrios: Not An Instant Ace
by
Daniel Rathman

05-02

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5

What You Need to Know: Zimmermann Dealin'
by
Ashley Varela

04-21

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What You Need to Know: Raisel Iglesias' Deus Ex Machina
by
Demetrius Bell

03-11

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8

Life at the Margins: Catching Down
by
Rian Watt

03-03

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3

Winter Is Leaving
by
Sam Miller

02-25

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0

Pitching Backward: The Superest Utility
by
Jeff Long

02-01

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1

Rubbing Mud: Catch a Tiger
by
Matthew Trueblood

01-26

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6

Baseball Therapy: It's Nice to Have Options
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-19

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8

Transaction Analysis: Upton a Luxury the Tigers can Afford
by
Matthew Trueblood

12-29

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2

Rumor Roundup: Yo Back to Motown?
by
Daniel Rathman

12-17

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11

Players Prefer Presentation: Baseball Owners and Their Predictable Needs
by
Meg Rowley

12-02

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6

Raising Aces: Free Agent Roulette: Jordan Zimmermann
by
Doug Thorburn

11-30

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Transaction Analysis: It's All Happening, 'Mann
by
R.J. Anderson and Mike Gianella

11-18

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34

2016 Prospects: Detroit Tigers Top 10 Prospects
by
Christopher Crawford and BP Prospect Staff

11-11

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8

Rubbing Mud: The Great Big Exasperated AL Central Shrug
by
Matthew Trueblood

10-12

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6

Prospectus Feature: DRA and Linear Weights. And Justin Verlander.
by
Jonathan Judge

09-30

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7

Rubbing Mud: Check Norris
by
Matthew Trueblood

05-22

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2

What You Need to Know: Bummed!
by
Daniel Rathman

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A.J. Ramos does it wrong, Max Scherzer's striking people out, J.D. Martinez rejoins a suddenly serious Tigers team, and more.

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Non-All-Star Ian Kinsler's very good career is not defined by many of the markers that make a Hall of Famer. Will his final half-decade change that?

Among the many highlights from last night's All-Star game, none featured Ian Kinsler. Ian Kinsler was not an All-Star.

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The Tigers, left for dead after last season, have defied expectations.

The Tigers have to go for it, this year. There’s really no debate here. The aging core of Miguel Cabrera (33 years old, .310 TAv, 2.0 WARP), Justin Verlander (33, 87 cFIP, 2.82 DRA, 3.4 WARP), Victor Martinez (37, .305, 1.3), and Ian Kinsler (34, .303, 2.6) will never be this productive again—even if you figure it’s actuarially unlikely that they’ll sustain their current levels for even the rest of this year. Nick Castellanos (24, .301, 2.1) is having a great season, and maybe it’s the beginning of his emergence into the star slugger the Tigers envisioned years ago—he’s still young. Then again, maybe it’s the juiced ball, or maybe he’s just run into a few balls and generated a transformed batting line that belies relatively unchanged underlying skills. (He still strikes out a lot, and still doesn’t walk very much, for instance.)

Cameron Maybin is having an insane season, riding a carriage that could turn back into a pumpkin almost anytime, but which gives the Tigers a legitimate, well-rounded offense for as long as it lasts. Justin Upton has slowly come around (.246/.319/.434 since June 1), and J.D. Martinez will be back before the end of July (you know, maybe). Wonder of wonders, the Tigers have a competent bullpen right now. Francisco Rodriguez has brought stability to the closer’s role, and working backward from there, Alex and Justin Wilson, Kyle Ryan, and the somehow-only-25-year-old Bruce Rondon have done decent work in piecing together the rest.

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The White Sox hit seven home runs, Kevin Gausman and Carlos Carrasco toss four-hitters, and Jose Altuve goes for the cycle.

The Weekend Takeaway

There are no givens in baseball. A 10-run lead can evaporate under the misdirection of a tired bullpen, a no-hitter can be lost on a misplayed fly ball, and a ninth-inning tie can be broken on a walk-off balk. Still, there are certain markers which, once they are passed, provide a feeling of security.

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Fielder for Kinsler was supposed to be the fix for both teams' surpluses, but the 2016 season has put the clubs' returns in stark relief.

Three offseasons ago—November 20, 2013 to be exact—Detroit and Texas made a rare one-for-one, star-for-star trade between contending teams, with the Tigers sending five-time All-Star first baseman Prince Fielder to the Rangers in exchange for three-time All-Star second baseman Ian Kinsler. In addition to the obvious star power involved, this particular trade had some interesting money-related factors and featured the analytical juxtaposition of a traditional slugger with shiny RBI totals and negative defensive value being swapped for an up-the-middle defender with less of a bat and a far more varied all-around game.

Three-and-a-half years later the trade looks like a blowout victory for the Tigers, to the extent that they added one of the best all-around infielders in the league and saddled the Rangers with a bad player on an albatross contract that runs through 2020 at an annual salary of $24 million. All of which is much different than things appeared around this time last year when Fielder, not Kinsler, was chosen for the All-Star team on the strength of his .339/.403/.521 first half that seemed to be proof of a full recovery from the neck surgery that halted his first season in Texas after 42 games.

Fielder’s production fell off in the second half, as he hit .264/.348/.394, and this season he’s been arguably the worst everyday player in baseball. WARP sees him as producing the sixth-worst overall value, with all five of the lower-WARP players—A.J. Pierzynski, Mark Teixeira, Dioner Navarro, Ryan Howard, Chris Coghlan—playing part-time or sitting on the disabled list. Fielder has started 67 of 72 games for the Rangers, hitting .203/.273/.325 with his usual bad defense and poor baserunning, which is how he’s the lone big leaguer with more than 200 plate appearances and a WARP worse than -1.0. Dating back to last year’s All-Star break Fielder has hit a combined .235/.313/.356 in 140 games.

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Michael Fulmer goes streaking, Edwin Encarnacion remembers how to hit home runs, and Cole Hamels tries out a new look.

The Weekend Takeaway
It’s always nice when you can look back on a trade that erased Yoenis Cespedes from your lineup and smile. This was the general feeling on Sunday when right-hander Michael Fulmer dismantled the Yankees with another six scoreless frames, extending his streak to 23 ⅓ innings without a run. It’s a streak worth preserving, and one that’s already made history, according to ESPN Stats & Info:


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Did Justin Verlander announce his resurgence in a Twitter reply?

Twitter can be a rough, unforgiving place for baseball players. Their mentions stink with fans using the direct line to bombard them with criticism, name-calling, and personal attacks. Players can't reply in tone, of course, so they can ignore, or they can reply with positivity—as Jake Arrieta did, three years ago, in an exchange culminating in a now-legendary tweet.

Arrieta, then with the Orioles, received a tweet from a stranger on the internet telling him “you f***ing suck” and “go back to the minors.” It was April 21, 2013 and Arrieta had just allowed five runs in four innings against the Dodgers to raise his ERA on the season to 6.63 and his career ERA to 5.41.

He was no doubt frustrated and unhappy with how his career was going at age 27. But instead of lashing out (with cause) at a person who had lashed out at him (without cause), Arrieta killed him with kindness. Well, mostly. Arrieta replied: “Agreed. Gotta be better. If we see each other in person, you should avoid me.” That could be viewed as a threat, but it could also just be a factual statement made to a person who said “you f***ing suck.”

After a bit more back and forth Arrieta totally changed the tone of the conversation to the point that the same person who kicked things off by saying “you f***ing suck” was telling him things like “you have great stuff” and “good luck to you.” He even got the guy to admit “maybe I have anger issues.” All of which is interesting in itself, but my favorite part is Arrieta promising,

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A utility man who isn't, a formerly great closer who wasn't, and a comeback story no one knows.

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It was a disaster for the Twins pitcher, just like down the road it was a disaster for the Blue Jays pitcher, J.A. Happ.

The Monday Takeaway
There were eight major-league games played yesterday, and half of them featured a team scoring double-digit runs. Only one of them chased the opposing starter in the first inning, though, and that same team’s skipper was gone by the fourth. That’s ample reason to begin this recap in Detroit, where there was a whole lot offense accompanied by a whole lot of ugly on Monday night.

Jose Berrios took the hill in the last of the first and figured, “Ah, I’ll just groove a fastball for strike one.” Little did he know that Ian Kinsler was locked, loaded, and ready to fire:


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Marcus Stroman has a happy birthday, Clayton Kershaw continues to pitch in a class of his own, and Trevor Story finds another way to write himself into the history books.

The Weekend Takeaway
Talent and luck rarely keep the same company, but they found a mutual friend in Jordan Zimmermann on Saturday afternoon. The Tigers’ right-hander polished his ERA to a shiny 0.55 mark with another pristine outing against the Twins, striking out seven in his fifth consecutive win and going seven innings without issuing a walk for the first time since July 22, 2015.


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The weirdest thing happened to the Reds' ace. Meanwhile, good job Chris Sale, good job Orioles, good job Jordan Zimmermann, great job Aaron Hicks.

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The looming disasters behind the plate in the AL Central.

Disaster comes in many forms. In 2016, one of those forms will probably be catching in the American League Central. There is no other position-division combination which PECOTA projects so poorly in the aggregate: Four of the division’s five teams project to generate 0.4 WARP or less from the catcher position in 2016, and three project to actually lose value (relative to replacement level) from their catchers next year. Cleveland, which has Yan Gomes holding down the fort at the position, is the lone exception to the rule.

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