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Articles Tagged Detroit Tigers 

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06-27

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1

What You Need to Know: Sometimes You Win, Sometimes You Hit Seven Homers and Lose
by
Ashley Varela

06-23

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0

Prospectus Feature: The Increasingly Lopsided Everybody-Wins Trade
by
Aaron Gleeman

06-13

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What You Need to Know: Nothing Left to Do But Win
by
Ashley Varela

06-07

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3

Prospectus Feature: From a Cesspool, Success
by
Aaron Gleeman

06-03

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0

Transaction Analysis: Just A Guy(s)
by
Bryan Grosnick

05-17

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5

What You Need to Know: Jose Berrios: Not An Instant Ace
by
Daniel Rathman

05-02

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5

What You Need to Know: Zimmermann Dealin'
by
Ashley Varela

04-21

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What You Need to Know: Raisel Iglesias' Deus Ex Machina
by
Demetrius Bell

03-11

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8

Life at the Margins: Catching Down
by
Rian Watt

03-03

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3

Winter Is Leaving
by
Sam Miller

02-25

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Pitching Backward: The Superest Utility
by
Jeff Long

02-01

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1

Rubbing Mud: Catch a Tiger
by
Matthew Trueblood

01-26

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6

Baseball Therapy: It's Nice to Have Options
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-19

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8

Transaction Analysis: Upton a Luxury the Tigers can Afford
by
Matthew Trueblood

12-29

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2

Rumor Roundup: Yo Back to Motown?
by
Daniel Rathman

12-17

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11

Players Prefer Presentation: Baseball Owners and Their Predictable Needs
by
Meg Rowley

12-02

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6

Raising Aces: Free Agent Roulette: Jordan Zimmermann
by
Doug Thorburn

11-30

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0

Transaction Analysis: It's All Happening, 'Mann
by
R.J. Anderson and Mike Gianella

11-18

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34

2016 Prospects: Detroit Tigers Top 10 Prospects
by
Christopher Crawford and BP Prospect Staff

11-11

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8

Rubbing Mud: The Great Big Exasperated AL Central Shrug
by
Matthew Trueblood

10-12

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6

Prospectus Feature: DRA and Linear Weights. And Justin Verlander.
by
Jonathan Judge

09-30

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7

Rubbing Mud: Check Norris
by
Matthew Trueblood

05-22

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2

What You Need to Know: Bummed!
by
Daniel Rathman

05-22

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9

Rubbing Mud: The Quarter-Season Odds Report
by
Matthew Trueblood

05-08

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1

Painting the Black: This Year's Eephus
by
R.J. Anderson

04-27

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21

Rubbing Mud: The Worst Holes On Contenders
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-23

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6

What You Need to Know: Baseball on Ice!
by
Chris Mosch

04-21

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1

What You Need to Know: April 21, 2015
by
Chris Mosch

04-15

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11

Rubbing Mud: The Early-Season Odds Changers
by
Matthew Trueblood

03-23

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8

Every Team's Moneyball: Detroit Tigers: Dealing Dombrowski
by
Nick Shlain

03-19

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14

An Agent's Take: What A Comeback Takes
by
Joshua Kusnick

02-27

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0

Transaction Analysis: The Bad Bullpen Teams Get A Little Less Bad
by
R.J. Anderson and J.P. Breen

02-25

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10

Pebble Hunting: What the Heck, Tigers?
by
Sam Miller

01-21

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43

2015 Prospects: Detroit Tigers Top 10 Prospects
by
Chris Mellen and BP Prospect Staff

01-19

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9

Rumor Roundup: Big Yields Shields
by
Daniel Rathman

01-13

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14

Prospectus Feature: The 2014 All Out-of-Position Team
by
Andrew Mearns

01-12

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1

Rumor Roundup: Tigers Talk Big About Scherzer
by
Daniel Rathman

12-29

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6

Rumor Roundup: Tigers Like Tiger, Tigers Say
by
Daniel Rathman

12-23

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17

Baseball Therapy: Do Stars and Scrubs Lineups Actually Work?
by
Russell A. Carleton

12-15

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6

Transaction Analysis: Sixty Percent of a Red Sox Rotation
by
Andrew Koo

12-12

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10

Transaction Analysis: The Pitchers the Reds Shed
by
R.J. Anderson, Zachary Levine and Jordan Gorosh

12-08

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5

Transaction Analysis: Replacing a Legend
by
R.J. Anderson, Craig Goldstein, Mike Gianella, Andrew Koo and Jordan Gorosh

11-24

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0

Fantasy Team Preview: Detroit Tigers
by
Nick Shlain

11-20

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1

Pitching Backward: The Guy Who Makes Scherzer (Slightly More) Expendable
by
Jeff Long

11-14

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12

Transaction Analysis: Jays Leggo Their A. Gose
by
R.J. Anderson, Craig Goldstein and Jordan Gorosh

11-13

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4

Transaction Analysis: Victor Control
by
R.J. Anderson and Nick Shlain

11-04

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32

Painting the Black: The Free Agent 50
by
R.J. Anderson

10-30

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2

Hot Stove Scouting Report: Max Scherzer
by
CJ Wittmann

10-07

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1

Prospectus Feature: The Great Octoberness Rankings
by
Miles Wray

10-06

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6

Playoff Prospectus: Quartet of Consequence: The Four Plays That Keyed An ALDS Sweep
by
R.J. Anderson

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The White Sox hit seven home runs, Kevin Gausman and Carlos Carrasco toss four-hitters, and Jose Altuve goes for the cycle.

The Weekend Takeaway

There are no givens in baseball. A 10-run lead can evaporate under the misdirection of a tired bullpen, a no-hitter can be lost on a misplayed fly ball, and a ninth-inning tie can be broken on a walk-off balk. Still, there are certain markers which, once they are passed, provide a feeling of security.

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Fielder for Kinsler was supposed to be the fix for both teams' surpluses, but the 2016 season has put the clubs' returns in stark relief.

Three offseasons ago—November 20, 2013 to be exact—Detroit and Texas made a rare one-for-one, star-for-star trade between contending teams, with the Tigers sending five-time All-Star first baseman Prince Fielder to the Rangers in exchange for three-time All-Star second baseman Ian Kinsler. In addition to the obvious star power involved, this particular trade had some interesting money-related factors and featured the analytical juxtaposition of a traditional slugger with shiny RBI totals and negative defensive value being swapped for an up-the-middle defender with less of a bat and a far more varied all-around game.

Three-and-a-half years later the trade looks like a blowout victory for the Tigers, to the extent that they added one of the best all-around infielders in the league and saddled the Rangers with a bad player on an albatross contract that runs through 2020 at an annual salary of $24 million. All of which is much different than things appeared around this time last year when Fielder, not Kinsler, was chosen for the All-Star team on the strength of his .339/.403/.521 first half that seemed to be proof of a full recovery from the neck surgery that halted his first season in Texas after 42 games.

Fielder’s production fell off in the second half, as he hit .264/.348/.394, and this season he’s been arguably the worst everyday player in baseball. WARP sees him as producing the sixth-worst overall value, with all five of the lower-WARP players—A.J. Pierzynski, Mark Teixeira, Dioner Navarro, Ryan Howard, Chris Coghlan—playing part-time or sitting on the disabled list. Fielder has started 67 of 72 games for the Rangers, hitting .203/.273/.325 with his usual bad defense and poor baserunning, which is how he’s the lone big leaguer with more than 200 plate appearances and a WARP worse than -1.0. Dating back to last year’s All-Star break Fielder has hit a combined .235/.313/.356 in 140 games.

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Michael Fulmer goes streaking, Edwin Encarnacion remembers how to hit home runs, and Cole Hamels tries out a new look.

The Weekend Takeaway
It’s always nice when you can look back on a trade that erased Yoenis Cespedes from your lineup and smile. This was the general feeling on Sunday when right-hander Michael Fulmer dismantled the Yankees with another six scoreless frames, extending his streak to 23 ⅓ innings without a run. It’s a streak worth preserving, and one that’s already made history, according to ESPN Stats & Info:


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Did Justin Verlander announce his resurgence in a Twitter reply?

Twitter can be a rough, unforgiving place for baseball players. Their mentions stink with fans using the direct line to bombard them with criticism, name-calling, and personal attacks. Players can't reply in tone, of course, so they can ignore, or they can reply with positivity—as Jake Arrieta did, three years ago, in an exchange culminating in a now-legendary tweet.

Arrieta, then with the Orioles, received a tweet from a stranger on the internet telling him “you f***ing suck” and “go back to the minors.” It was April 21, 2013 and Arrieta had just allowed five runs in four innings against the Dodgers to raise his ERA on the season to 6.63 and his career ERA to 5.41.

He was no doubt frustrated and unhappy with how his career was going at age 27. But instead of lashing out (with cause) at a person who had lashed out at him (without cause), Arrieta killed him with kindness. Well, mostly. Arrieta replied: “Agreed. Gotta be better. If we see each other in person, you should avoid me.” That could be viewed as a threat, but it could also just be a factual statement made to a person who said “you f***ing suck.”

After a bit more back and forth Arrieta totally changed the tone of the conversation to the point that the same person who kicked things off by saying “you f***ing suck” was telling him things like “you have great stuff” and “good luck to you.” He even got the guy to admit “maybe I have anger issues.” All of which is interesting in itself, but my favorite part is Arrieta promising,

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A utility man who isn't, a formerly great closer who wasn't, and a comeback story no one knows.

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It was a disaster for the Twins pitcher, just like down the road it was a disaster for the Blue Jays pitcher, J.A. Happ.

The Monday Takeaway
There were eight major-league games played yesterday, and half of them featured a team scoring double-digit runs. Only one of them chased the opposing starter in the first inning, though, and that same team’s skipper was gone by the fourth. That’s ample reason to begin this recap in Detroit, where there was a whole lot offense accompanied by a whole lot of ugly on Monday night.

Jose Berrios took the hill in the last of the first and figured, “Ah, I’ll just groove a fastball for strike one.” Little did he know that Ian Kinsler was locked, loaded, and ready to fire:


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Marcus Stroman has a happy birthday, Clayton Kershaw continues to pitch in a class of his own, and Trevor Story finds another way to write himself into the history books.

The Weekend Takeaway
Talent and luck rarely keep the same company, but they found a mutual friend in Jordan Zimmermann on Saturday afternoon. The Tigers’ right-hander polished his ERA to a shiny 0.55 mark with another pristine outing against the Twins, striking out seven in his fifth consecutive win and going seven innings without issuing a walk for the first time since July 22, 2015.


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The weirdest thing happened to the Reds' ace. Meanwhile, good job Chris Sale, good job Orioles, good job Jordan Zimmermann, great job Aaron Hicks.

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The looming disasters behind the plate in the AL Central.

Disaster comes in many forms. In 2016, one of those forms will probably be catching in the American League Central. There is no other position-division combination which PECOTA projects so poorly in the aggregate: Four of the division’s five teams project to generate 0.4 WARP or less from the catcher position in 2016, and three project to actually lose value (relative to replacement level) from their catchers next year. Cleveland, which has Yan Gomes holding down the fort at the position, is the lone exception to the rule.

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March 3, 2016 6:00 am

Winter Is Leaving

3

Sam Miller

No, really: Miguel Cabrera can hit.

In a few weeks, Miguel Cabrera will get the first paycheck under his new contract, an eight-year, $240 million extension that was signed two years ago. At the time, Grantland headlined it “an Unconscionable, Indefensible, All-But-Guaranteed Mistake,” which, yeah, might be totally true. An extension like Cabrera’s can end up being a mistake because the player doesn’t perform as well as the contract supposes, making the player’s value, by a reasonable calculation, less than his compensation. Albert Pujols’ contract with the Angels is a mistake by this standard. Robinson Cano’s with the Mariners, same.

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Or: The only way Jake Elmore is going to get this much ink on Baseball Prospectus.

What does it really mean to be a super utility player? I’m not talking about Ben Zobrist or Ryan Flaherty here. I’m talking about someone who can literally play any position the manager might need him to. What does that kind of player look like?

Four players have ever played all nine positions on the field in one major-league baseball game (assuming you ignore Will Ferrell, which we will do here). Bert Campaneris was the original, doing so on September 8th, 1965. A little over three years later, Cesar Tovar would accomplish the same feat for the Minnesota Twins during their final home game of the season. Fast forward more than 30 years and Scott Sheldon would accomplish the feat in a September game where his Texas Rangers got blown out by the Chicago White Sox. Last but not least, Shane Halter played all nine positions for the Tigers less than a month later, even scoring the winning run in the process.

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February 1, 2016 6:01 am

Rubbing Mud: Catch a Tiger

1

Matthew Trueblood

Detroit's baserunning was a major contributor to the club's last-place finish. How they, and other AL teams, will look on the bases this year.

The 2015 Detroit Tigers won just 74 games, and that doesn’t happen to a team without significant flaws. A lot of things went wrong for them, from the prolonged absence of Miguel Cabrera to the catastrophic collapse of Victor Martinez, to yet another impossibly implosive bullpen.

If one thing most stood out about the Tigers, though, it was how old they played, especially offensively. It was back in 2013, when the team was running out (too generous a phrase, perhaps) Prince Fielder, Torii Hunter, Cabrera, and Martinez, that everyone worried the Tigers’ offense would sputter to a stop because of its key cogs’ old, heavy legs. In 2015, though, with Hunter and Fielder gone, it actually happened. Detroit basestealers succeeded at a clip of just 62 percent. They grounded into the most double plays of any team in baseball. They racked up -21.9 baserunning runs (BRR), according to our calculus the second-worst in the league. They batted .270/.328/.420, raw figures that ranked first, second, and fifth in the AL, respectively. They were second in team OPS+ and seventh in TAv in the AL, but they finished 10th in runs scored. Baseball Info Solutions estimated that the team created 736 runs, but they only scored 689. Some of that, to be sure, is just bad sequencing—bad luck. Surely, though, some of it also must be chalked up to their miserable baserunning.

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