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Articles Tagged Danny Graves 

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For someone with an ERA of 8.71, Danny Graves makes an awful lot of noise. Also sounding off are Gary Sheffield on the World Cup, Fay Vincent on today's game, and Johnny Damon on the magnitude of...Johnny Damon.

"They know how much I want to come back. Hopefully, they don't use it to their advantage and disrespect me with a minimum of years and minimum of salary. I'm 31 now. [Jason] Varitek just turned 33 and they had no problem giving a catcher a four-year contract [worth $40 million], so I have a valid point there."
--Red Sox center fielder Johnny Damon, who's a free agent after this year (Boston Globe)

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June 16, 2005 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: May 24-June 12, 2005

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Christina Kahrl

The Cubs shuffle through pitching options, the Brewers have one of the most interesting rosters in the game, and the Dodgers fight through injuries as they try to stay in the race. This and much more in Transaction Analysis.

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March 23, 2005 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Building a Team, v3.0

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Joe Sheehan

Or "How To Move Out of 18th Place in an 18-Team League."

In the league's second season, I slipped from second all the way to 18th. (Hey, I believed the Expos' PECOTA projections last year, too.) My '04 squad had far too little offense to compete, walked into some bad luck early with injuries and playing time, and picked the wrong year to be on the Mike Mussina and Kevin Millwood trains. I did manage to pick up David Wright and David DeJesus in dump trades at midseason, which added to a fairly cheap core coming into '05. I really believed, going in, that I was a good auction away from jumping back into contention.

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March 1, 2005 12:00 am

Fantasy Focus: Closers in Peril

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Jeff Erickson

These three pitchers have the glamour role now, but are unlikely to keep it to the end of the year.

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July 14, 2004 12:00 am

Doctoring The Numbers: The Amazing Danny Kolb

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Rany Jazayerli

Imagine spending a week at your cubicle at work, slaving away at that TPS report, and then as you hand it to your boss, she tells you, "Thanks, but the company just decided that they didn't need the report after all. I was just about to e-mail you the memo." That's about how I feel right now. Having painstakingly put together an article on Danny Kolb, which centered around Kolb's incredible stretch of surrendering no extra-base hits all season, I was all set to have the article published during the All-Star Break--and then Kolb ran into the unstoppable force that is the PECOTA-powered Wily Mo Pena on Sunday. (Yes, I'm aware that Jason LaRue homered off Kolb before Pena did. But I've been working as a journalist long enough to know it's considered poor form to let the facts get in the way of a good story.) So the article is ruined. But you're going to have to read it anyway, unless you really want to hurt my feelings. I've taken the liberty of making some small changes to the piece, in light of Kolb's Sunday meltdown. Most of the points made in the article still stand, even if the punchline has been spoiled.

That's about how I feel right now. Having painstakingly put together an article on Danny Kolb, which centered around Kolb's incredible stretch of surrendering no extra-base hits all season, I was all set to have the article published during the All-Star Break--and then Kolb ran into the unstoppable force that is the PECOTA-powered Wily Mo Pena on Sunday.

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June 25, 2003 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: June 16-22, 2003

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Christina Kahrl

The White Sox may finally commit to Willie Harris. The Reds are playing all the wrong players. The Miguel Cabrera era begins in Florida. The Twins' handling of Johan Santana is a crime. News, notes, and Kahrlisms in the latest edition of Transaction Analysis.

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March 12, 2003 12:00 am

The Grand Experiment

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Nate Silver

Moving a top-notch reliever into the starting rotation is neither a new nor a particularly unusual idea. The Indians and Orioles experimented with moving Hoyt Wilhelm into a starting role in 1958, which culminated in a nationally televised no-hitter. Bill Lee and Wilbur Wood began their major league careers as relievers; Goose Gossage received a one-year trial as a starter; Rick Aguilera logged 89 career starts. Derek Lowe, of course, made a successful conversion last year, which may have helped assuage any misgivings on the parts of Bowden and Garagiola. What's interesting about this year's guinea pigs is that Graves and Kim are radically different pitchers. Both were born in the Far East and allow very few home runs; that's where the similarities end. Graves, statistically speaking, is a finesse pitcher--perhaps the most successful finesse closer since the beloved Dan Quisenberry. Kim is a fire-and-brimstone submariner, striking out a quarter of the batters he faces, sometimes at the cost of allowing others too many free passes.

Starting pitching has long been the Bowden Reds' weakest link; 30 league average starts out of Graves would go a long way toward placing them in the midst of a Great American Wild Card Race. The situation is even more critical in Arizona, where PECOTA is expecting a big decline in the Snakes' offense, and the lack of obvious short relief replacements makes the move a higher-risk gambit. If Kim can make the transition successfully, it's not unrealistic to imagine Diamondbacks finishing 1-2-3 in the league ERA race; anything less, and Arizona could have trouble defending its title in what should continue to be a highly-competitive division.

Moving a top-notch reliever into the starting rotation is neither a new nor a particularly unusual idea. The Indians and Orioles experimented with moving Hoyt Wilhelm into a starting role in 1958, which culminated in a nationally televised no-hitter. Bill Lee and Wilbur Wood began their major league careers as relievers; Goose Gossage received a one-year trial as a starter; Rick Aguilera logged 89 career starts. Derek Lowe, of course, made a successful conversion last year, which may have helped assuage any misgivings on the parts of Bowden and Garagiola.

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Without getting off into a tangent on why the Reds backed off their plan to move to a four-man rotation, any Reds fan should be a bit concerned that so much is expected of Graves.

Every year about this time, baseball fans everywhere spend far too much time looking for the next this, the latest that, the hottest prospect, and the biggest sleeper. While it keeps us active and leads to interesting thinking, even the best are seldom accurate at much better than a guess rate. Why? Because most of these types of exercises are nothing more than guesses themselves - educated guesses, but nonetheless so fraught with variables that no amount of good writing surrounding it makes it much more than a guess.

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