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Articles Tagged Curt Schilling 

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Ben and Sam talk to Jay Jaffe about the 2014 Hall of Fame voting results, election-season mud-slinging, the 2015 ballot, and more.

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A peak back at contemporary accounts of Curt Schilling's rise to stardom.

With the Hall of Fame announcement scheduled for this week, now is a good time to look back at the early careers of some of this year's most talked-about nominees. (And with the early exit polls looking as they do, it might be nice to remember just how great some of these players were.) This post was originally written (mostly) in 2009.

If this year's Hall of Fame ballot weren't explicitly designed by the baseball gods to ruffle a serious amount of feathers, one of the most intriguing new names would almost certainly be Curt Schilling. He's been in the news recently for many non-baseball reasons, but, as a player pitching for the World Champion Diamondbacks and Red Sox who struck out more than 300 batters three separate times, he was a great regular season pitcher whose postseason success may legitimately boost him into Cooperstown. With the hoopla at the top of the ballot, however, it might be a while before voters give him his fair due.

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May 21, 2012 3:31 am

Out of Left Field: When You Can't Buy a Loss

8

Matthew Kory

Being on the edge of history in Philadelphia.

I spent 10 years living in Philadelphia. I moved there on a lark, intending to leave almost immediately, but every time I’d try, I’d fail. I got the first job I cared about there, did the dating thing, met my wife*, attended and graduated from graduate school, and had my children there, all in the city.

* Me: Hello, I’m Matt. Woman: Hello, I’m your wife.

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Michael Pineda's labrum tear doesn't bode well for his future, but it's not the death sentence it used to be.

On Wednesday, the Yankees revealed that Michael Pineda had suffered a torn labrum, a devastating turn of events both for the 23-year-old righty and for the team that acquired him from the Mariners for top prospect Jesus Montero back in January. Pineda will miss the entire season and part of 2013, thinning the Yankees' surplus of starting pitching—and underscoring the fact that you can never have too much—while raising the question of whether they will ever get much value out of him.

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July 21, 2010 8:00 am

Checking the Numbers: To Subtract or Divide

8

Eric Seidman

There are major differences between statistics, and it is important not to misuse them.

In this day and age, baseball players are defined by their statistical attributes much more than they were a few decades ago. That isn’t to say that stats rule all by any means, but rather that teams are starting to be built with more of an eye toward numbers than in the past or at least with an eye toward numbers that provide more information. We have witnessed the defensive revolution. This past offseason, not only did the Red Sox make a conscious effort to bring aboard the darlings of fielding metrics—Mike Cameron, Marco Scutaro, and Adrian Beltre—but teams shied away from the likes of Jermaine Dye, who averaged 33 home runs and a .279/.347/.528 line over the last four seasons, because his overall contributions were not in line with his asking price. And last offseason, the glut of hard-hitting but poor-fielding corner outfielders suffered financially; it’s hard to imagine players with skill sets similar to those of Adam Dunn and Bobby Abreu being offered so little even just a few years ago.

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March 24, 2009 1:31 pm

Prospectus Today: Curt Schilling Bows Out

58

Joe Sheehan

As the great post-season performer walks away from the game, the questions over his Hall-worthiness are already being reviewed.

Alas, 38 pitches no more. Curt Schilling announced the end of his baseball career yesterday via a post on his popular blog, writing "it is with zero regrets that I am making my retirement official." While there had been some speculation that Schilling would continue his comeback from a torn right labrum, possibly with a contender other than the Red Sox, the damage after a long career is understandably too much to overcome. Schilling was effective right up to the point where he couldn't pitch any longer.

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June 21, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: Schilling in History

0

Joe Sheehan

If he's done, how do we evaluate his career in the context of all-time greatness and within his day and age?

(Ed. Note. There are references in here to four titles won by Schilling's teams. That number is three; my efforts to award the 1993 World Series to the Philadelphia Phillies this afternoon have been rejected. Apologies to the readers, to Blue Jays fans, and of course, to Joe Carter.--JSS)

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Derek has a rundown of a Game You May Have Heard About.

So the question is, why are we back with these two teams? They came into this weekend series a game and a half apart in the standings atop the AL East. So far, the Yankees have taken the first three games-sweeping a Friday doubleheader that featured an afternoon blowout and the longest nine-inning game in major league history in the nightcap, then blasting past the Sox in the late innings of Saturday's game. With two games left in the series, the Red Sox have the opportunity to salvage the series, or to watch a prime chance slip through their fingers. With the level of competition we are seeing in the AL Central, the loser of this division race is anything but guaranteed a playoff spot via the wild card.

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The Diamondbacks see some additions and subtractions to their "best team in history" (with more on the way), and we take a closer look at what may be wrong with Curt Schilling.

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Welcome all to the results of the Baseball Prospectus Mid-Season Awards. The points system is 10-7-5-3-1 for the MVP and Cy Young Awards, and 5-3-1 for the Rookie Awards. BP authors' picks, with all-too-clever comments, are included here, below the awards standings. Hitters: Ballots, Points (1st Place Votes), (Avg/OBP/SLG/RARP/VORP) Pitchers: Ballots, Points (1st Place Votes), (ERA, IP, SNWAR or ARP, VORP)

Welcome all to the results of the Baseball Prospectus Mid-Season Awards.

The points system is 10-7-5-3-1 for the MVP and Cy Young Awards, and 5-3-1 for the Rookie Awards. BP authors' picks, with all-too-clever comments, are included here, below the awards standings.

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As pitchers and catchers report to sunny climes this week--soon to be joined by hitters, beer vendors, and spring breakers--much will be made of the battle for the five slots in the New York Yankees' starting rotation.

As pitchers and catchers report to sunny climes this week--soon to be joined by hitters, beer vendors, and spring breakers--much will be made of the battle for the five slots in the New York Yankees' starting rotation.

The Yankees, you see, have seven handsomely--paid starters--what hubris!--any of whom could start on opening day for the Newark Bears or the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes, or if you give them a mulligan on Sterling Hitchcock, about half the teams in the major leagues. It is the greatest waste of talent, so it would seem, since Ocean's Eleven.

Here is our cast of seven, in most probable order of appearance:

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Winning a close race with Barry Zito and Derek Lowe, Pedro Martinez followed in the footsteps of Randy Johnson, Greg Maddux and Roger Clemens by winning his fourth Internet Cy Young Award.

Winning a close race with Barry Zito and Derek Lowe, Pedro Martinez followed in the footsteps of Randy Johnson, Greg Maddux and Roger Clemens by winning his fourth Internet Pitcher of the Year Award. Zito was actually named on more ballots than Martinez and finished a extremely strong second. He is the last member of Oakland's big three to finish among the top three in Internet AL Pitcher of the Year voting; Mark Mulder finished third in 2001 and Tim Hudson finished third in 2000. Lowe, who allowed less runs per 9 innings than anyone in baseball in 2002, finished a strong third. Of last year's top three finishers, only Mark Mulder received any significant support this time around, finishing seventh. The highest ranking reliever this year was Billy Koch, who finished tenth.

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