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Articles Tagged Cory Lidle 

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Not all players leave the game or this world via the traditional retirement path

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A tragedy in New York dominated the week, although people still found time to talk about the playoffs.

''The whole plane has a parachute on it. Ninety-nine percent of pilots that go up never have engine failure, and the 1 percent that do usually land it. But if you're up in the air and something goes wrong, you pull that parachute, and the whole plane goes down slowly.''
--Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle, 34, last month. Lidle died on Wednesday after his plane crashed into an Upper East Side apartment building. (The New York Times)

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July 31, 2006 12:00 am

Transaction of the Day: Bobby Abreu to the Yankees

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Christina Kahrl

Christina checks in on the weekend's biggest deal.

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A minor league announcer has an on-air tirade about replacement umpiring and a blown call, Cory Lidle is brutally honest about Barry Bonds, there's a brawl in an A's-Angels game, and more.

"There's no score in the game, they clearly struck out Scott on a checked swing that appeared to be in the dirt, but when [batter Luke] Scott started to trot to first, [catcher Jamie] Burke had already flipped the ball to the home plate umpire, and was on the way to the dugout and they couldn't retrieve the ball and the umpire was hanging on to it. I think once the umpire gets involved in the play, by catching the ball, the inning is over. If the umpire blew the call, then the inning is over, folks."
--KEBC radio announcer Jim Byers, during the Oklahoma-Round Rock game on May 3rd, when umpires blew a dropped strike call (KEBC)

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April 7, 2005 12:00 am

Lies, Damned Lies: Looking Back at the Market

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Nate Silver

Nate Silver breaks down the long-term deals handed out this season, PECOTA-style.

One of the nifty things about PECOTA is that it projects performance more than one year into the future; I don't know of any other system that does that, or at least not one that's available publicly. One-year projections are fine for a lot of things, but they can be absolutely misleading when you're using them to make a decision with a longer time horizon than that, such as determining who to retain for your keeper league or which free agent to sign to a $50-million contact. Let's take a look, for example, at the year-by-year WARP projections for the six free agents who were signed to contracts totaling $50 million or more this past winter:

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August 14, 2004 12:00 am

Transaction Analysis: August 9-10

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Christina Kahrl

A number of young players--J.D. Closser, Jairo Garcia, and Cha Seung Baek among them--reached the majors last week. Chris Kahrl evaluates the arrivals and also dissects the Reds/Phillies trade in the latest TA.

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Curt Schilling could be perfectly suited for Fenway Park. The Reds' rotation needs a lift from some young guns. The Marlins don't need a roof on a new ballpark. The Yankees hope to avoid jet lag on their trip home from Japan. The Pirates' baserunning errors didn't hurt much last year. The Padres should expect improvement in their rotation. These and other news and notes in today's Double-Stuft edition of Prospectus Triple Play.

  • McCarty in 2004: David McCarty's last-gasp bid to make the Opening Day roster continues. The 34-year-old tagged two home runs late last week, in the midst of an eight-game hitting streak. The fact that he's only drawn one walk this spring would be cause for more concern if he didn't now have six homers, one off teammate David Ortiz's major league lead.
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    It's Wednesday night, and I didn't write my column early because I was watching the Mariners-Athletics game. Now I sit down, feeling a little vindicated for my season-long fight against local anti-Mike Cameron sentiment. The Mariners face the A's again tomorrow, starting Joel Pineiro against Cory Lidle. The Angels have John Lackey facing Colby Lewis. I don't think this particularly unfair to the Mariners; it's not as if they didn't have their chances to beat up on bad teams, or anything. Their pit is one they've dug themselves with crappy pickups and a low-key battle between the manager and GM, where Piniella seems determined to put the awful pieces he's been given (like Jose Offerman) in crucial game situations where their failures are magnified. Gillick in retaliation doesn't care.

    It's Wednesday night, and I didn't write my column early because I was watching the Mariners-Athletics game. Now I sit down, feeling a little vindicated for my season-long fight against local anti-Mike Cameron sentiment.

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    People complain that it's unfair to some teams chasing the wild card. Perhaps, but with "natural rivalries" and bizarre interleague schedules, fairness has already been tossed out the window.

    The unbalanced schedule rules.

    People complain that it's unfair to some teams chasing the wild card. Perhaps, but with "natural rivalries" and bizarre interleague schedules, fairness has already been tossed out the window. At least divisional play can make for great matchups, unlike, say, the thrilling mid-week sweep of the Brewers by the A's in June.

    This comes up because there's an awesome division race in the AL West, and I get to see it because I'm lucky enough to be in Seattle. I honestly prefer this year's nail-biting, wonder-if-we'll-make-it marathon to last year's record 116 wins, when it was obvious by the All-Star break that the Mariners were heading to the playoffs.

    As I write this, the Ms are two-and-a-half games up on the Angels. Anaheim has put together the weirdest run at .600 ball and a division title as I can remember, a straight batting average and no-strikeout attack. If you look at the raw stats, they're right up with the Mariners in run scoring, despite giving up 16 points of OBP and having a comparable slugging average. Park-adjusted, the offenses aren't close, but I still look at the daily standings and shake my head. Neither team made race-changing trades before the deadline, though the Angels picked up a spare outfielder--Alex Ochoa--who the M's could have used.

    Meanwhile, Oakland made moves to improve for the stretch run, trading for Ricky Rincon and Ray Durham, and they're just four games back, with a front-line pitching rotation that can put the hurt on anyone and a dangerous offensive core.

    The Mariners play both teams six more times, a home-and-home series each, including a can't-miss-it buy-your-tickets-now September homestand against the Angels and A's starting September 20 (just after the most likely strike date, for my convenience).

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    June 3, 2002 10:53 pm

    Transaction Analysis: Transaction Analysis: May 30-June 1

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    Christina Kahrl

    Chris Kahrl examines trades involving 11 teams from May 30 to June 1, 2002.

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