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Articles Tagged Corey Hart 

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12-12

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1

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 347: The Rule Changes, Trades, and Signings of Winter Meetings Day Three
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

09-05

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2

BP Unfiltered: The Correlation Between Height and Sacrifice Bunting
by
Sam Miller

03-09

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10

Collateral Damage: Stairway to Heaven
by
Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

03-05

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9

Collateral Damage: Valley of Infections and Tears
by
Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

03-02

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13

Prospectus Preview: NL Central 2012 Preseason Preview, Part II
by
Stephani Bee and Larry Granillo

02-22

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1

The BP First Take: Wednesday, February 22
by
Daniel Rathman

10-15

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13

Playoff Prospectus: NLCS Game Five: One Away from Elimination
by
Derek Carty

05-24

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5

Tater Trot Tracker: Trot Times for May 23
by
Larry Granillo

05-03

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4

Transaction Analysis: Opportunity Knocks
by
Ben Lindbergh

02-18

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13

Fantasy Beat: Donnybrook - Corey Hart
by
Michael Jong and Michael Street

07-22

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6

Changing Speeds: Cold Fusion
by
Ken Funck

04-23

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31

Checking the Numbers: Inside Pitch-f/x
by
Eric Seidman

03-24

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7

Team Health Reports: Milwaukee Brewers
by
Brad Wochomurka

07-23

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0

Fantasy Beat: Mid-Season Retooling: Right Field
by
Marc Normandin

04-07

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0

Prospectus Today: Milwaukee Mash-up
by
Joe Sheehan

01-16

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Transaction Analysis: Challenges and Carousels
by
Christina Kahrl

02-15

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Lies, Damned Lies: PECOTA Takes On Prospects, Part Two
by
Nate Silver

02-10

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0

Prospectus Notebook: Brewers, Yankees
by
Baseball Prospectus

05-25

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0

Transaction Analysis: May 20-24, 2004
by
Christina Kahrl

11-07

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0

Prospectus Feature: The Arizona Fall League
by
Jonah Keri

07-19

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Transaction Analysis: June 25-July 14, 2002
by
Christina Kahrl

02-13

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0

From The Mailbag: Special Edition: Top 40 Prospects
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-01

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Prospectus Roundtable: How the Sausage Was Made
by
Baseball Prospectus

08-01

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Transaction Analysis: July 27-31, 2000
by
Christina Kahrl

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Ben and Sam discuss home plate collisions, the neighborhood play, and moves by the Mariners, Mets, and Nationals.

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Tall players hit more home runs. Short players bunt more. But wait there's more!

There are 499 baseball players (non-pitchers) who have at least 50 plate appearances this year. I sorted them by height. What follow are the correlations between height and various offensive statistical measures. Of course, correlation does not equal causation etc etc et cetera.

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March 9, 2012 3:00 am

Collateral Damage: Stairway to Heaven

10

Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

David Robertson battles a staircase while other players nurse their respective wounds.

David Robertson, New York Yankees (Right Mid-Foot Sprain)
Not all injuries occur on the baseball field. Robertson was moving boxes, missed a step, and fell down a flight of stairs. He went for an x-ray Wednesday night; the result was negative. An MRI was used to confirm a mid-foot sprain, but Robertson needed further tests, including a CT scan and a weight-bearing x-ray.

This combination of testing raises the concern for a Lisfranc injury, the same one that felled Chien-Ming Wang in 2008. The CT can provide a very detailed picture of that joint, including a 3-D reconstruction. The standing x-ray is the tip-off, though. The MRI reveals a mid-foot sprain in severe Lisfranc injuries, while the CT may or may not reveal a fracture in the area. The standing x-ray most likely won’t show a fracture, but it will show if there is any increased space between the bones, indicative of instability in the area. When there is instability, there is a significant risk of severe long-term damage if the area does not heal through conservative measures or surgery. Without knowing the results of all of the tests, we cannot definitively say surgery is necessary.


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March 5, 2012 3:00 am

Collateral Damage: Valley of Infections and Tears

9

Corey Dawkins and Stephani Bee

The Mets' injury parade drags on, while the Brew Crew might lose an important hitter for the start of the season.

Ike Davis, New York Mets (Valley Fever)
Davis, who is on the mend from a 2011 ankle injury, has been diagnosed with “likely” having valley fever. Valley fever is a soil-dwelling fungus typically found in southwestern United States and northern Mexico, and it grows during rainy periods. The spores can break off and be inhaled whenever the soil is disrupted. Valley fever is generally benign, but more severe cases can include pneumonia, lung nodules, or the fungus spreading to other parts of the body. In severe cases, oral antifungal medications are used.

Davis underwent a routine chest x-ray during his spring physical, but the results were determined to be abnormal. After consulting multiple pulmonary and infectious disease specialists, he was diagnosed with a mild form of valley fever. He is not on any medications, but he must try to avoid extreme fatigue. Conor Jackson also had valley fever, but Davis is expected to make a full recovery without missing any time.


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Part two of a roundtable discussion about how action in the NL Central will shake out in 2012.

PECOTA Team Projections
​Record: 85-77
Team WARP: 31.7
Team TAv: .260
Runs Scored: 742
Runs Allowed: 699
Team FRAA: 2.9







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The Brewers' ability to replace Prince's, and potentially Ryan Braun's, bat is tied in Corey Hart's versatility.

With Prince Fielder gone and Ryan Braun likely to be suspended for the first 50 games of the regular season, the Brewers need to get creative to squeeze maximum value out of their remaining position players. Fortunately, manager Ron Roenicke is showing a willingness to do so.

On Tuesday, Roenicke confirmed that he intends to have right fielder Corey Hart work out at first base this spring. If Hart is capable of handling occasional starts at Fielder’s old position, his newfound versatility would allow Roenicke to tweak the lineup from day to day, optimizing matchups both offensively and in the field.

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October 15, 2011 12:00 am

Playoff Prospectus: NLCS Game Five: One Away from Elimination

13

Derek Carty

Sloppy defense does the Brewers in, putting Milwaukee at a 3-2 disadvantage.

With the NLCS tied at 2-2, we had the makings of a pitchers’ duel, as the Cardinals’ sinkerballing lefty Jaime Garcia opposed Zack Greinke, former AL Cy Young winner. While Garcia looked downright dominating through most of the game, Greinke did not, allowing seven hits and failing to notch a single strikeout.

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The tater trots for May 23: one of the more memorable days in home runs in the last couple of years.

I'm not sure I've ever had a day with such a tight competition for the Home Run of the Day. Here in Milwaukee, Corey Hart hit his first, second, and third home runs of the year in the Brewers' 11-3 rout of the Nationals. In San Diego, Albert Pujols hit his first home run in over 100 plate appearances (that didn't stop him from admiring the blast). Jose Bautista continued his torrid pace of making obnoxious sportswriters say inane things with his 19th home run of the season. In Detroit, Andy Dirks hit his first career home run. Josh Hamilton and Nelson Cruz returned to the Rangers' lineup down in Texas and proceeded to each hit a home run to celebrate their return. For a day with only twenty-one home runs hit, it certainly seemed like every one of them was meaningful.

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Brian Bogusevic, Alex White, and two Giants infielders make the most of other people's injuries, the Dodgers swap backup catchers, the Snakes switch futilitymen, and the Padres ponder their first base future.

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Should you be afraid of the guy in shades?

BP readers, it's time to leave the benches and bullpens and join the Donnybrook! Leave your comments below about which side you're on, or suggest another Donnybrook question for two BP writers to tussle over. Today's question: "Has Corey Hart finally arrived?"

Michael Street: Milwaukee fans and fantasy owners have had a love/hate relationship with Corey Hart. Check out his performance since his 2007 breakthrough:

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A look at the surprise home run hitters of 2010, relative to their pre-season PECOTA forecasts.

On Tuesday night in Kansas City, Blue Jays right fielder Jose Bautista launched his major league-leading 26th home run, continuing one of the most unexpected power surges in recent memory. Long known as a journeyman with decent patience and a modicum of power, few expected Bautista at this stage of his career to suddenly turn into a long-ball machine. It’s always fun to see players suddenly show a propensity for the long ball—perhaps we identify with players who manage the baseball equivalent of the young Marty McFly balling up his fist and decking Biff with an unexpected haymaker. 

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April 23, 2009 12:30 pm

Checking the Numbers: Inside Pitch-f/x

31

Eric Seidman

Dissecting a day at the office for the Mets' Johan Santana.

Due to local blackout rules and the lack of a land-line phone capable of proving that my Penn State University residence was not in Philadelphia, I relied on MLB Gameday instead of MLB TV for a good chunk of the 2007 season. The application had been around for a while, but I soon noticed strange terminology and new data accompanying each pitch. Why are there two velocity readings? What does 13" of pFX mean? And what the heck is BRK? A little research soon made sense of the information, and within a few months I became hooked on the data set known as Pitch-f/x. Fast-forward two years, and Pitch-f/x continues to evolve, revolutionizing baseball research in the process. Unfortunately, with updates to system configurations and the amount of information offered, too many readers and baseball fans experience confused reactions similar to mine when they first encounter the data. In an attempt to quash this issue, it seemed prudent to explain some of the more commonly used numbers, discussing what they mean as well as how they should be used. Instead of merely defining terms, the system will be explored in action, with periodic discussions of its inner workings, much as Dan Fox did back in May 2007.

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