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Articles Tagged Coors Field 

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02-20

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3

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 390: 2014 Season Preview Series: Colorado Rockies
by
Ben Lindbergh, Sam Miller and Nick Wheatley-Schaller

11-12

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2

Pebble Hunting: Rereading Nate Silver: 5. The Colorado Effect
by
Sam Miller

05-21

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3

Sporer Report: Has Coors Gone Light?
by
Paul Sporer

04-02

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17

Baseball ProGUESTus: Which Pitch Types Work Best at Coors Field?
by
Dan Rozenson

12-05

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0

BP Unfiltered: Rockies Must Regain Home Edge Under Weiss
by
Zachary Levine

09-17

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1

BP Unfiltered: Petco vs Coors
by
Sam Miller

09-05

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2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 35: Is Coors Field to Blame for the Rockies' Struggles?/Are Fans at Fault When Teams Don't Draw?
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-24

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5

Pebble Hunting: The Rockies and Real Home Run Hitters
by
Sam Miller

08-18

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6

BP Unfiltered: The Longest Home Run Hit Since 2009
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-29

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: The Right Team for the Test?
by
Rany Jazayerli

06-23

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0

BP Unfiltered: Project 5183
by
R.J. Anderson

03-13

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0

Prospectus Hit and Run: Running Afoul
by
Jay Jaffe

10-11

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0

Schrodinger's Bat: On Atmosphere, Probability, and Prediction
by
Dan Fox

08-03

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0

Prospectus Today: Something's Rotten in Den...ver
by
Joe Sheehan

05-24

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Prospectus Q&A: Bill Geivett
by
Jonah Keri

02-21

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Prospectus Feature: PECOTA At Altitude: A Review of Major League Hitters in Colorado
by
Nate Silver

07-16

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0

Doctoring The Numbers: Defense in Colorado
by
Rany Jazayerli

07-16

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Doctoring The Numbers: Defense in Colorado
by
Rany Jazayerli

07-11

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0

Doctoring The Numbers: Offense in Colorado
by
Rany Jazayerli

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Ranging across a couple of old and new themes, explaining that there's something about the weather, and Pythagoras can rock steady.

"All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism."
--Unknown


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Jeff Cirillo's comments about the baseballs used at Coors Field were right on the money.

The Associated Press reported a story yesterday that pushed me to do research I'd been wanting to do for a while. Tuesday afternoon, Brewers utility infielder Jeff Cirillo pointed out what should have been obvious for some time: that the Rockies' use of a humidor for storing game balls has gone past the point of a minor correction for atmospheric conditions and become a means to creating a pitchers' park. Cirillo cited little more than the way a ball felt in his hand and second-hand comments by his teammates, but he did add this:

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May 24, 2006 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Bill Geivett

0

Jonah Keri

The Rockies are off to a hot start, and Jonah sits down with one of the architects of the current team, Bill Geivett. On the menu: developing young talent, competing at altitude, and creative decision making.

Bill Geivett played several seasons in the Angels' minor league system before hanging up his cleats. He quickly caught on with the Yankees as an area scout. Geivett has logged multiple stops since then. He served as farm director for the Expos; he went to Tampa Bay before the Rays ever took the field; he spent two years with the Dodgers, ascending to the role of Assistant General Manager. Geivett joined the Rockies after the 2000 season. His tenure in Colorado started on the major league scouting side. After two years he took over minor league operations. For the last two years Geivett has held the title of Assistant General Manager, Vice President of Baseball Operations for the Rockies.

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There is enough evidence to perform at least an exploratory empirical analysis of what types of skills are best accentuated by Coors Field.

Up until now, the Coors Field Wars have been fought from the top down. There have plenty of theories advanced about what sort of hitter should do well at Coors. Joe Sheehan presented one theory (players who put the ball in play make best use of Coors), Rany Jazayerli presented another (high altitude provides a comparative advantage to whiff-prone hitters by reducing strikeouts), and Dan O'Dowd has tested out both theories and then some in his manic building and rebuilding of the Rockies.

What hasn't been done, at least so far as I am aware, is a systematic study of what sort of hitters actually have benefited from high altitude. Baseball in Denver is no longer a novelty; the Rockies have accumulated tens of thousands of plate appearances in their decade of existence. There is enough evidence to perform at least an exploratory empirical analysis of what types of skills are best accentuated by the ballpark.

Methodology

Including the Mile High years, there have been 29 hitters with significant major league experience in another organization who accumulated at least 130 plate appearances in a season in purple pinstripes. Although it would be stretch to call any of those hitters an established superstar prior to his initiation as a Rockie - Larry Walker can make the best case - they represent every possible permutation of strength and deficiency. It would be hard to identify two more opposite players than Dante Bichette and Alex Cole, who took the outfield together in the Rockies' first ever home game on April 9, 1993.

I turned back the clock and ran PECOTA projections for each of these 29 players. There are only a couple of differences between this set of forecasts and those that appear in this year's book. First, because we do not have Davenport Translations that far back into time, only major league stats were used; thus the emphasis on established major leaguers. Second, all players were projected into a neutral park and league. The PECOTA system makes certain assumptions about how to apply park effects - all players are not treated equally. In this case, however, we're using our forecasting system to test out certain theories about actual performance, and not the other way around; introducing PECOTA's notions about park effects would bias the analysis.

We can get away with comparing park-neutral forecasts to park-affected results by using a measure for value that places all players back on an equal footing - in this case, Equivalent Average. Our nouveau Rockies are listed in the table below, sorted by the difference between their expected and actual EQA.

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July 16, 2002 1:58 am

Doctoring The Numbers: Defense in Colorado

0

Rany Jazayerli

Continuing our discussion from last week on how to build a team at Coors Field, this time, from the run-prevention side.

Continuing our discussion from last week on how to build a team at Coors Field, this time, from the run-prevention side.

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In Baseball Prospectus 2002, Joe Sheehan wrote:

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This year marks the tenth season of major league baseball in Denver. It is clear now that none of us fully understood what we were getting ourselves into when we allowed Rocky Mountain thin air to be unleashed on our national pastime. Nine years and literally thousands of hanging curveballs, home runs, and destroyed pitcher psyches later, we're still trying to wrap our hands around the conundrum that is baseball at altitude. (And before you mention the word "humidor", consider that with the recent run of explosive offense at Coors Field, the Rockies and their opponents have combined to score 11.74 runs per home game, compared to 8.61 runs per game on the road - a 36% increase. It may no longer be the best hitters' park of all-time - Coors Field increased run scoring by 58% from 1999 to 2001 - but it's still the best hitters' park of our generation.)

This year marks the tenth season of major league baseball in Denver. It is clear now that none of us fully understood what we were getting ourselves into when we allowed Rocky Mountain thin air to be unleashed on our national pastime. Nine years and literally thousands of hanging curveballs, home runs, and destroyed pitcher psyches later, we're still trying to wrap our hands around the conundrum that is baseball at altitude.

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