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Articles Tagged Coors Field 

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04-10

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The Buyer's Guide: Mark Reynolds
by
Eric Roseberry

09-24

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3

Fantasy Freestyle: Searching for Silver Bullets
by
J.J. Jansons

07-29

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2

The Buyer's Guide: Jose Reyes
by
J.P. Breen

02-20

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3

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 390: 2014 Season Preview Series: Colorado Rockies
by
Ben Lindbergh, Sam Miller and Nick Wheatley-Schaller

11-12

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2

Pebble Hunting: Rereading Nate Silver: 5. The Colorado Effect
by
Sam Miller

05-21

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3

Sporer Report: Has Coors Gone Light?
by
Paul Sporer

04-02

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17

Baseball ProGUESTus: Which Pitch Types Work Best at Coors Field?
by
Dan Rozenson

12-05

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BP Unfiltered: Rockies Must Regain Home Edge Under Weiss
by
Zachary Levine

09-17

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1

BP Unfiltered: Petco vs Coors
by
Sam Miller

09-05

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2

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 35: Is Coors Field to Blame for the Rockies' Struggles?/Are Fans at Fault When Teams Don't Draw?
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

08-24

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5

Pebble Hunting: The Rockies and Real Home Run Hitters
by
Sam Miller

08-18

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6

BP Unfiltered: The Longest Home Run Hit Since 2009
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-29

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0

The BP Wayback Machine: The Right Team for the Test?
by
Rany Jazayerli

06-23

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BP Unfiltered: Project 5183
by
R.J. Anderson

03-13

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Prospectus Hit and Run: Running Afoul
by
Jay Jaffe

10-11

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Schrodinger's Bat: On Atmosphere, Probability, and Prediction
by
Dan Fox

08-03

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Prospectus Today: Something's Rotten in Den...ver
by
Joe Sheehan

05-24

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Prospectus Q&A: Bill Geivett
by
Jonah Keri

02-21

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Prospectus Feature: PECOTA At Altitude: A Review of Major League Hitters in Colorado
by
Nate Silver

07-16

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Doctoring The Numbers: Defense in Colorado
by
Rany Jazayerli

07-16

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Doctoring The Numbers: Defense in Colorado
by
Rany Jazayerli

07-11

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Doctoring The Numbers: Offense in Colorado
by
Rany Jazayerli

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April 10, 2017 6:00 am

The Buyer's Guide: Mark Reynolds

0

Eric Roseberry

He's getting playing time with the Rockies because of Ian Desmond's injury, and some of the early statistical indicators are encouraging, but what should fantasy owners do in the short- and long-term regarding the free-swinging slugger?

Few players had a better opening week than Rockies first baseman Mark Reynolds. He has started the season by going 9 for 22 with three home runs, four runs scored, and eight RBIs. His early production caught the eye of fantasy owners who made him one of the most-added players of the past week. Reynolds’ ownership percentage has gone from 4 percent to 41 percent in CBS leagues. He experienced a similar spike in ESPN leagues, where he went from 1.5 percent owned to 41.6 percent owned. Reynolds was the second-most added player on Yahoo this week, checking in behind only Kendall Graveman. In 60 percent of leagues, there’s still a chance you could add Reynolds to your roster. The obvious question is: Should you?

We’ll start by looking at the good and the bad when it comes to Reynolds. At the close of the article, a suggested decision will be offered (buy, sell or hold). Is Reynolds a viable fantasy option moving forward?

The Good

At this point owners, are only dealing with a week’s worth of data. It’s an incredibly small sample, and it’s impossible to spot any long-lasting trends yet. But if there is one positive sign to be optimistic about, it might be Reynolds’ strikeout rate.

For his career, Reynolds has a whiff rate of 31 percent. He’s never finished a season with a strikeout rate under 25 percent. However, he did take a positive step forward a season ago by dropping it to a career low 25.4 percent. So far in 2017, Reynolds’ whiff rate is 16.7 percent. If there was any real change to his approach this past season, it looks like those gains might hold this year.

Reynolds also has shown the ability in the past to provide major power production. From 2009-2012, he had three straight seasons hitting at least 32 homers, and he clubbed a career-high 44 in 2009. It’s been a number of years since he’s looked like that type of player, and it’s safe to assume that, at his current age, his power production will be diminished.

The move to Coors Field seemed to provide Reynolds with a bump in a couple of categories in which he’s typically struggled. His batting average was a career-high .282 a season ago, and his .356 OBP was noticeably higher than his .327 career mark. Somewhat surprisingly, he didn’t see much of a bump in power production at the same time.

The Bad

The obvious issue with Reynolds is that he could quickly be out of a job. Ian Desmond was supposed to be the starting first baseman in Colorado this season, but he’s been out since mid-March with a broken hand. Publicly, the team has said that Desmond should only be out four-to-six weeks, and it sounds as if he’s progressing on schedule. Desmond could be back in Colorado’s lineup in a matter of weeks. Even with a hot start, that would leave Reynolds without a regular spot in the Rockies lineup. The team has much more incentive to play Desmond, who they signed to a 5-year, $70 million deal this offseason, than Reynolds (1-year, $1.5 million). There really is nowhere else they can play Reynolds defensively (unless you wanted to put him in the outfield, but my guess is you don’t).

Reynolds’ track record should also give fantasy owners plenty of caution when assessing this recent outburst. He hasn’t hit 20 home runs since 2014, and the highest batting average he tallied since 2010 was .230 before last season’s .282 mark. PECOTA projected Reynolds to finish this year with a .237 BA and 12 home runs. Those numbers are much closer to what owners should expect than something like .260 with 20+ long balls. At 33 years old, it’s more than likely that Reynolds’ best days are behind him.

Buyer’s Guide: Sell (unless he’s simply a short-term CI option).

The playing-time concerns hang over Reynolds’ hot start like a dark cloud. Unless Desmond experiences a setback, there’s just not any realistic way Reynolds will see regular playing time this season. You might hang on to Reynolds through the first few weeks of Desmond’s return to ensure the injury doesn’t flare up but, beyond that, there’s not much season-long value here.

The one exception to selling on Reynolds is if you simply need a short-term stopgap at a corner-infield spot. He’s going to be the everyday first baseman until Desmond returns, and he’s likely to return more value at this point than any other option readily available in the free-agent pool. If you’re heavily relying on Reynolds for the rest of the season, something could have gone wrong on draft night.

If you own Reynolds, now is the time to try and deal him for whatever you can get. Maybe there’s an owner in your league struggling at 1B/3B. Reynolds could be an attractive option to them given the production they’re looking at after a week’s worth of games. If you can get an owner to bite and return anything of value, now is the time to do it.

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September 24, 2015 9:36 am

Fantasy Freestyle: Searching for Silver Bullets

3

J.J. Jansons

A look at a trio of under-the-radar Rockies hitting prospects whose stocks could spike on their way to Coors.

Similarly to under-hyped Yankees and Red Sox fantasy prospects (a rare breed), undervalued Rockies fantasy hitting prospects—although rare—do exist in the wild. Sure, we’ve all been burned by a few Josh Rutledges and Ian Stewarts in our day, but there is plenty of future value to be mined in a deep Rockies system, even once you get past the likes of Trevor Story, David Dahl, Raimel Tapia, Forrest Wall, Ryan McMahon, and the recently drafted Brendan Rodgers.

Every fantasy owner knows that Coors Field is a magnificent place for a hitter to call home, and some of the most productive homegrown Rockies have flown relatively under the fantasy radar. A glance at the current edition of the Rockies roster finds multiple fantasy darlings who were far from top prospects, including Corey Dickerson, an eighth-round pick in 2010 from South Alabama, who failed to appear on a single one of our top-10 team lists (he did appear at no. 17 on the 2012 list) and finished last season as a top-20 overall outfielder. Mister Charlie Blackmon, or “Chuck Nazty,” if you’re well, nasty, peaked at no. 7 on Kevin Goldstein’s team top-10 list in 2011 after being taken in the second round of the 2010 draft out of Georgia Tech and is currently the third-ranked outfielder (and seventh-overall player) on ESPN’s Player Rater. Blackmon barely managed to squeeze his way onto fantasy overlord Bret Sayre’s top-120 outfielder list for dynasty purposes prior to the 2014 season, based largely upon playing-time concerns. Even bona fide fantasy monster Nolan Arenado—likely a top-25 dynasty property heading into the winter—peaked at 32nd on the top-100 fantasy prospect list prior to his debut in the 2013 season.

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July 29, 2015 6:00 am

The Buyer's Guide: Jose Reyes

2

J.P. Breen

Is the move to Coors Field a boon for the shortstop's fantasy value?

In the aftermath of Troy Tulowitzki being traded to Toronto, many of the storylines focused on either the Blue Jays’ powerful offense or the Rockies’ unfortunate handling of the trade in relation to previous agreements made with Tulowitzki. Fantasy owners have flooded the Bat Signal with questions about Tulowitzki’s value in Toronto and whether it’s time to sell on right-hander Jeff Hoffman before he gets devoured by Coors Field.

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Ben and Sam preview the Rockies' season (and analyze Coors Field) with Russell A. Carleton, and Nick talks to Denver Post Rockies beat writer (and National Baseball Writer) Troy Renck (at 30:39).

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November 12, 2013 6:00 am

Pebble Hunting: Rereading Nate Silver: 5. The Colorado Effect

2

Sam Miller

Are the Rockies passig up a substantial advantage?

Note: This winter, I'm rereading and reviewing Nate Silver's entire archive here at BP. Today will be a longer one.

5. PECOTA at Altitude: A Review of Major League Hitters in Colorado
February 21, 2003


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May 21, 2013 5:00 am

Sporer Report: Has Coors Gone Light?

3

Paul Sporer

Opposing pitchers haven't fared quite as badly in the thin air of Denver in 2013 as they have in past years, but that doesn't mean you should lower your start-sit bar.

Patrick Corbin’s filthy, complete-game gem on Monday night in Coors Field drew a chorus of Twitter facepalms as many fantasy managers shied away from the excellent-thus-far-but-still-unproven lefty in the terrifying Denver venue. Of course, if they read last week’s Two-Start Planner, they would’ve had Corbin in their lineups, as I gave him a full “Start” recommendation despite the risk associated with Coors. Back-patting aside, I’ve been keeping a close eye on Coors Field this year and as I mentioned in the aforementioned Planner “it really hasn’t been as scary as it was last year,” and we may need to lower our threshold for starters to consider when they’re traveling to Denver.

It’s not like the Rockies offense has completely fallen off, either. Their 5.02 runs per game is the National League’s best clip and baseball’s second-best, while their 5.55 runs per game at home also tops the NL and checks in third overall behind Detroit (6.20) and Texas (5.58). Last year, the Rockies were scoring six runs per game at home—baseball’s best by half a run—so the competition hasn’t been as fierce when opposing pitchers toe the slab in Coors Field. But it hasn’t been anywhere near easy, either, and yet we are seeing a lot more success from the starters facing the Rockies.

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A PITCHf/x look at the type of arsenal that fares well at altitude.

Most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Dan Rozenson writes about PITCHf/x and sabermetrics for Beyond the Box Score and Big Leagues Mag. Follow him on Twitter @SixToolPlayer.
 


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The Rockies teams of the last few years made a talent gap worse by failing to take advantage of Coors Field. It's a priority for new manager Walt Weiss to change that.

The “best home field advantage in baseball,” as Walt Weiss calls the situation he is taking over as new Rockies manager, isn’t given out as a perk of the job, as if the edge were crowd noise. It is taken, and Weiss seems to understand that.

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September 17, 2012 12:02 pm

BP Unfiltered: Petco vs Coors

1

Sam Miller

The simplistic park comparison.

Petco Park opened in 2004. Before this weekend, the Rockies and Padres had played 162 games against each other since then, one full season's worth of games. Eighty-three were in Colorado and 79 were in San Diego. Same pitchers, same hitters, same managers, same everything; just different parks. So how differently do Petco and Coors play? 

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Ben and Sam consider whether the ballpark might be to blame for the Rockies' lackluster first two decades, then discuss the annual phenomenon of attendance shaming.

Ben and Sam consider whether the ballpark might be to blame for the Rockies' lackluster first two decades, then discuss the annual phenomenon of attendance shaming.

Episode 35: "Is Coors Field to Blame for the Rockies' Struggles?/Are Fans at Fault When Teams Don't Draw?"

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August 24, 2012 5:00 am

Pebble Hunting: The Rockies and Real Home Run Hitters

5

Sam Miller

Giancarlo Stanton's recent rampage against the Rockies inspires two questions: Have the Rockies ever had a "real" power hitter? And if not, why the heck haven't they?

We'll start as soon as Giancarlo Stanton's home run in Coors Field from last Friday night lands.

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The longest home run hit in almost three years went out on Friday night. You know you want to watch it.

On Friday night, with the Marlins losing 5-4 to the Rockies in the top of the sixth and Josh Roenicke on the mound, Giancarlo Stanton hit an important home run. It wasn't important because it tied the game, although the Marlins would go on to win by one run. This was a matchup between two last-place teams, so the outcome was about as inconsequential as the outcomes of baseball games come. It was important because it looked like this:

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