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Articles Tagged Cooperstown 

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01-17

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9

Raising Aces: Classic Deliveries: Hall of Fame Inductees 1980-89
by
Doug Thorburn

01-10

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1

The BP Wayback Machine: The Old You're In, You're Out
by
Joe Sheehan

01-09

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23

Baseball Therapy: The Hall of Fame Ballots By the Numbers
by
Russell A. Carleton

01-09

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1

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 361: Jay Jaffe on the Top Takeaways from the Hall of Fame Election Season
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

01-08

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9

Overthinking It: What Scouts Said About 2014's Top Cooperstown Candidates
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-08

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1

BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 360: Scouting 2013 Hall of Fame Candidates
by
Ben Lindbergh and Sam Miller

01-07

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21

Skewed Left: What the 1936 Hall of Fame Ballot Tells Us About Today's
by
Zachary Levine

12-12

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11

Skewed Left: A Cooperstown Party Like it's 1999
by
Zachary Levine

11-19

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26

Pebble Hunting: The Hall of Fame 50 Percent Probability Test
by
Sam Miller

11-15

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4

BP Unfiltered: Things the Hall of Fame is Not the Hall of, According to a Quick Search
by
Ben Lindbergh

04-23

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1

BP Announcements: Cooperstown, SABR Team Up to Create New Scouts Interactive Database
by
Joe Hamrahi

01-07

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9

BP Unfiltered: Time to Push the Reset Button
by
Dave Studeman

05-24

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10

Wezen-Ball: A Shocking Bit of Truth
by
Larry Granillo

02-17

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17

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Greatness of Gary Carter
by
Jay Jaffe

01-17

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28

Overthinking It: Jorge Posada, the Hall of Fame, and the Fog of WARP
by
Ben Lindbergh

01-16

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22

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Keltner All-Stars, Part II
by
Jay Jaffe

01-13

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61

Heartburn Hardball: Jack Morris in Motion
by
Jonathan Bernhardt

01-10

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28

Prospectus Hit and Run: Barry, Black Jack, and the Big Ballot Surges
by
Jay Jaffe

01-04

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The Catch-All
by
Jay Jaffe

12-30

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41

Prospectus Hit and Run: Morris on the Ballot, Smith to Close
by
Jay Jaffe

12-28

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42

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: The First Basemen
by
Jay Jaffe

12-22

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13

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: Can We Just Stick Edgar in the Corner?
by
Jay Jaffe

12-19

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18

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2012: Middle Infielders
by
Jay Jaffe

10-13

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17

Prospectus Hit and Run: Leyland's Cooperstown Case
by
Jay Jaffe

07-29

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: Beltran and Damon
by
Jay Jaffe

07-24

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7

Wezen-Ball: Who You Find in Cooperstown
by
Larry Granillo

07-23

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6

BP Unfiltered: The Hallworthy Alomar and Blyleven
by
Jay Jaffe

07-22

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23

Prospectus Hit and Run: Cooperstown's Backhanded Compliment
by
Jay Jaffe

07-22

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3

On the Beat: Calling Cooperstown
by
John Perrotto

07-20

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22

The Lineup Card: The Top 13 Veterans Committee Selections That Weren't THAT Bad
by
Baseball Prospectus

02-08

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3

Prospectus Hit and Run: I Saw 'em When, Part 2
by
Jay Jaffe

02-04

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20

Prospectus Hit and Run: Dandy Andy Bows Out
by
Jay Jaffe

01-07

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12

On the Beat: The Stat Geek Heads to Cooperstown
by
John Perrotto

01-04

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7

Prospectus Hit and Run: Class of 2011: The Right Fielders
by
Jay Jaffe

12-29

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10

Prospectus Hit and Run: Class of 2011: No Shortage of Quality Shortstops
by
Jay Jaffe

12-23

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Class of 2011: Bagwell and Baggage
by
Jay Jaffe

12-20

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: Class of 2011: Starting Pitchers
by
Jay Jaffe

11-22

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35

Prospectus Hit and Run: Billy and George
by
Jay Jaffe

08-13

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8

Prospectus Q&A: On Trammell and Whitaker
by
David Laurila

07-28

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7

Prospectus Hit and Run: Don't Call it the Veterans' Committee
by
Jay Jaffe

07-23

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12

Prospectus Hit and Run: If Hawk, Then Rock
by
Jay Jaffe

04-09

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31

Prospectus Hit and Run: Chugging Toward Cooperstown
by
Jay Jaffe

03-26

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10

Prospectus Hit and Run: Mauer and JAWS
by
Jay Jaffe

02-17

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16

Prospectus Hit and Run: Tom Glavine
by
Jay Jaffe

02-16

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24

Expanded Horizons: Thomas and Glavine
by
Tommy Bennett

02-16

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11

Prospectus Hit and Run: The Big Hurt
by
Jay Jaffe

01-13

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77

Prospectus Hit and Run: 10 Men Out
by
Jay Jaffe

01-06

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41

Prospectus Hit and Run: Hall of Fame Cases for Pitchers
by
Jay Jaffe

12-23

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14

Prospectus Hit and Run: Hall of Fame Cases at Third and Short
by
Jay Jaffe

12-21

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52

Prospectus Hit and Run: Alomar, the Crime Dog, the Big Cat and Big Mac
by
Jay Jaffe

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A look at the mechanics of Catfish Hunter, Hoyt Wilhelm, Don Drysdale, Juan Marichal, and Bob Gibson.

Five pitchers were elected to the Hall of Fame by the BBWAA during the 1980s, a number that feels light when one considers the half-dozen arms that were elected in the first five years of the '90s. But the five-pack fairly represents the average induction rate for the four-decade period from 1970-2009. For all the talk about how the modern era is underrepresented in the Hall, it is worth noting that the BBWAA elected just 0.32 pitchers per year from 1936-69 (11 total arms) but has enshrined 0.58 pitchers per year since 1970 (26 total, including the 2014 inductions of Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine).

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A humble proposal of a more equitable and efficient voting process for induction into the Hall of Fame.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

Joe Sheehan anticipated many 2014 complaints about the Hall of Fame election process in the piece reprinted below, which was originally published as a "Prospectus Today" column on December 18, 2008.

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Statistical takeaways from Wednesday's vote.

There’s now officially nothing left to talk about in baseball for another six weeks. But at least we get some good news. Three new plaques will be going up in Cooperstown this summer, a welcome change from the unfortunate shutout that happened during last year’s Hall of Fame voting. Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, and Frank Thomas will all take their places in rural New York. After weeks of the usual arguments over PEDs, the merits of Jack Morris, and the 10-person ballot limit, it’s nice to take a step back and reflect on how good the Class of 2014 really was. Also, we should take a moment to realize that the ballot is starting to read like a BuzzFeed list of “Players that only baseball fans from the ’90s would understand.”

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Ben and Sam talk to Jay Jaffe about the 2014 Hall of Fame voting results, election-season mud-slinging, the 2015 ballot, and more.

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The hits and misses scouts made on future Hall of Fame-caliber players.

“Scouting is hard,” exhibit no. 887: even Hall-of-Fame talent is tough to identify. The median draft position of the 14 players on my make-believe Hall of Fame ballot—excluding Edgar Martinez and Larry Walker, who were signed as amateur free agents—was 28.5. This is a cohort that includes some of the most talented players of the past few decades, including a few with strong cases in the “best ever” argument. But even though almost all of them turned out to be the best in their draft class—unless, like Greg Maddux and Tom Glavine, multiple members were selected in the same year—collectively, they lasted until the tail end of the first round. None of them was picked higher than sixth overall (Barry Bonds). Mike Piazza was pick no. 1,390. Some scout, somewhere, might have seen a future Cooperstown candidate in each of these players, but that wasn’t the industry consensus.

We don’t know what every scout said about every player, but we do know what some scouts said about some players, thanks to Diamond Mines, the Hall of Fame’s archive of declassified scouting reports. For each of the 14 players I mock-voted for, I looked up the earliest Diamond Mines scouting report available to see whether there was any hint of a Hall-of-Famer-to-be. “You Won’t Believe What These 14 Scouting Reports Said,” is what I would have titled this article if I were better at being click bait.

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Ben and Sam discuss BP's Hall of Fame ballot, then review early scouting reports on the players BP would have voted in.

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Player limits, backlogs, character clause controversies...none of it is new.

Hall of Fame voting is decidedly broken. Or maybe it’s only a mess depending on the alarmism factor of the columnist who says so. Or maybe the Hall itself is broken and beyond repair.

The problems are deep-rooted and comprehensive, covering everything from interpretation of the ballot to the moralizing of the voting base.

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December 12, 2013 6:00 am

Skewed Left: A Cooperstown Party Like it's 1999

11

Zachary Levine

Despite the big backlog of qualified candidates, 2014 could bring the best crop of Cooperstown inductees in well over a decade.

It was probably my favorite story idea that I’ve come up with in the 13 months I’ve been working at Baseball Prospectus, in part because it was so original. In the wake of the election of zero living Hall-of-Famers for the 2013 induction class, when everyone was writing about what a travesty this was for the Hall, I told Ben Lindbergh I was going to write about the tragedy for the village of Cooperstown.

It was an original idea until it was already written even before the vote. Until the story of one of my favorite places in the world, just 70 miles from my own hometown, was so well told months later that there was nothing left to say. Until business honchos in the village were apparently changing their answering machine messages to preempt the questions about the death of a yearly tradition of late July.

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November 19, 2013 6:00 am

Pebble Hunting: The Hall of Fame 50 Percent Probability Test

26

Sam Miller

At what win threshold are players at each age level a 50-50 shot to make the Hall of Fame?

I was wondering whether Andrew McCutchen, after winning his first MVP award, was on a Hall of Fame track. So I went to look at what the typical Hall of Famer had at the same age, then realized with shame that the thing I’ve been doing all these years—looking at what the typical Hall of Famer had at the same age—doesn’t make any logical sense. Yes, the average Hall of Famer might have had (X) WARP through age 26, but

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The perfect companion post for your next debate about the Hall.

At some point in the next six weeks, you’ll find yourself arguing about the Hall of Fame with someone whose mind is already made up. (That someone will, at that moment, be having the same experience.) You’ll have a vague sense that this kind of conversation historically hasn’t gone anywhere, and you’ll be tempted to walk away, but you’ll be damned if you’re going to get on the same page about anything with this Lee Smith-loving, Tim Raines-rejecting anti-intellectual, even agreeing to disagree. At this impasse, there’s only one way to win: by reminding them that it’s called the Hall of Fame, not the Hall of whatever crazy criterion they’re using to decide who deserves to get in.

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More than 14,000 scouting reports available through online companion to Museum display

A special group of people near and dear to my heart will finally get recognition this year as the Baseball Hall of Fame opens up its Diamond Mines exhibit honoring professional and amateur scouts. Thanks to the work of my esteemed SABR colleagues Rod Nelson, the late Jim Sandoval, Ted Turocy and Sean Lahman, data linking more than 11,000 players with the names of their signing or recommending scout will now be available to the general public. I've seen the work first-hand, and it's truly some amazing stuff. Below is the full press release of today's announcement.

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AChange.org petition to ask the Hall of Fame Board of Directors to change their voting process

I know the results from the latest Hall of Fame voting aren’t in yet, but it’s already clear that the process is deeply flawed. It was always imperfect, but its flaws are now deep, possibly mortal. The voting process is not equipped to handle the messy challenges of our day, and the Hall of Fame is suffering as a result.

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