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Articles Tagged Colorado Rockies 

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12-08

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2

Transaction Analysis: Texas Two-Step
by
Bryan Grosnick

09-02

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4

The Call-Up: Raimel Tapia
by
Jeffrey Paternostro and George Bissell

08-30

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2

Rubbing Mud: Incremental Improvement In Denver
by
Matthew Trueblood

08-20

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0

The Call-Up: Jeff Hoffman
by
James Fisher and Scooter Hotz

07-25

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The Call-Up: David Dahl
by
Christopher Crawford and George Bissell

07-25

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0

What You Need to Know: Just For the Record
by
Ashley Varela

06-28

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2

Prospectus Feature: Tulo's Bat Is As Cold As The Rockies
by
Aaron Gleeman

06-23

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0

What You Need to Know: Yankees/Rockies 2: The Beltran Rises
by
Demetrius Bell

06-21

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0

What You Need to Know: Eight Solo Shots!
by
Daniel Rathman

06-15

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2

What You Need to Know: Don't Ever Get Used to Coors Field
by
Nicolas Stellini

05-24

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4

Baseball Therapy: Framing the At-Bat
by
Russell A. Carleton

05-21

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1

Raising Aces: Shades of Gray
by
Doug Thorburn

04-29

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2

Prospectus Feature: Goodbye, April: You Are Not Special
by
Rob Mains

04-25

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4

What You Need to Know: FernandoMaedaia?
by
Ashley Varela

04-14

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2

What You Need to Know: The Return Of The Four-Out Save
by
Demetrius Bell

04-11

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What You Need to Know: The Fella's Last Name Is Story
by
Ashley Varela

04-07

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1

What You Need to Know: Need Cano Basehits!
by
Demetrius Bell

04-06

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4

Rubbing Mud: An Aptitude for Altitude
by
Matthew Trueblood

03-31

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1

Rumor Roundup: Tim Lincecum, Still Exists
by
Demetrius Bell

03-28

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1

Winter Is Leaving
by
R.J. Anderson

02-08

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7

Tools of Ignorance: Forget It, Jake
by
Jeff Quinton

01-27

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5

Rubbing Mud: The Latest Rockies Identity
by
Matthew Trueblood

01-13

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0

Rumor Roundup: There Were Four In the Bed and the Little One Said...
by
Daniel Rathman

12-23

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1

Rubbing Mud: Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, Charlie?
by
Matthew Trueblood

12-09

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1

Transaction Analysis: A Motte in the Dark
by
R.J. Anderson, Dustin Palmateer and Christopher Crawford

11-25

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29

Players Prefer Presentation: Baseball Players Hit Women, Too
by
Meg Rowley

09-24

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3

Fantasy Freestyle: Searching for Silver Bullets
by
J.J. Jansons

05-14

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6

Rubbing Mud: Very Bad But Not (Altogether) Boring
by
Matthew Trueblood

04-14

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38

Baseball Therapy: Hit the Pitcher Eighth?
by
Russell A. Carleton

04-08

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7

What You Need to Know: A Shift in Colorado
by
Chris Mosch

04-07

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6

Rubbing Mud: Don't Trade Tulo
by
Matthew Trueblood

03-26

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6

Transaction Analysis: It's Olivera Now, Baby Blue
by
R.J. Anderson

03-19

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10

Every Team's Moneyball: Colorado Rockies: Trouble with the Curve
by
Dan Rozenson

02-11

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3

Rumor Roundup: Phillies' Dream: Veteran Who Catches AND Plays Shortstop
by
Daniel Rathman

02-09

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Transaction Analysis: Texas' New Platoon
by
R.J. Anderson

02-06

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23

Daisy Cutter: Baseball's Greatest One-Hit Wonder
by
Sahadev Sharma

02-05

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2

Transaction Analysis: An Ax To Sign
by
R.J. Anderson

01-13

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6

Rumor Roundup: Three Stories About NL West Teams Pursuing Pitching
by
Daniel Rathman

01-05

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6

Transaction Analysis: The Byrd Has Landed
by
R.J. Anderson and Ben Carsley

12-22

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32

2015 Prospects: Colorado Rockies Top 10 Prospects
by
Nick J. Faleris and BP Prospect Staff

12-19

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1

Rumor Roundup: Kenta Maeda Will Not Be Appearing In This Feature (Beyond Today)
by
Daniel Rathman

12-17

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4

Transaction Analysis: Royals Bank on a Rios Rebound
by
R.J. Anderson, Ben Carsley and Nick Shlain

12-12

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0

Transaction Analysis: Turn Down For Rut
by
R.J. Anderson and Bret Sayre

12-04

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9

Fantasy Team Preview: Colorado Rockies
by
J.P. Breen

11-06

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9

Hot Stove Scouting Report: Michael Cuddyer
by
Chris Rodriguez

10-09

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3

Transaction Analysis: Rocky Mountain Bye
by
R.J. Anderson

09-08

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3

Transaction Analysis: Lose the Boss
by
R.J. Anderson

09-03

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0

Transaction Analysis: The ReCall-Ups
by
Sam Miller

08-06

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10

Moonshot: Troy Tulowitzki and the Brittle Bones Hypotheses
by
Robert Arthur

07-22

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11

Notes About Baseball, 7/22
by
Rocco DeMaro

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What did we learn about various players and teams this month? Less than we'll learn in the next one.

Early season baseball is full of articles about “What we’ve learned so far” after a week, or two weeks, or a month of play. You can’t really blame the sportswriters and TV sports producers and podcast hosts who come up with these pieces. They have to talk about something, and there aren’t any pennant races or awards competitions to discuss in April.

As Russell Carleton has demonstrated, though, most measures of baseball performance take far longer than a week or three to stabilize. Drawing conclusions from a 10- or 20-game sample is akin to statistics problem sets involving drawing balls from an urn. A really, really big urn. With lots and lots of balls in it. When you draw a few balls from a really, really big urn with lots and lots of balls in it, you don’t get a good picture of what’s really in the urn.

But how useless are April statistics? Are they worse than those from other months? On one hand, last April Andrew McCutchen batted .194/.302/.333 and Jose Iglesias batted .377/.427/.536. Jon Lester had a 6.23 ERA while Ubaldo Jimenez’s was 1.59. Those weren't particularly durable figures. On the other hand Dallas Keuchel’s 0.73 April ERA and Josh Donaldson’s .319/.370/.549 April batting line were.

We can look at the relevance of April numbers by correlating them to players’ full-year figures, and comparing the correlation in April to that of May, June, July, August, and September. (Throughout this analysis, April includes a few days of March play in the relevant years, and September includes a few days of October games.) To do this, I selected batting title and ERA qualifiers from each of the past 10 seasons and compared their monthly results to their full-year results. I had a sample of 1,487 batter seasons with corresponding monthly data in about 87 percent of months and 850 pitcher seasons with corresponding monthly data in 86 percent of months.

Admittedly, there’s a selection bias in April data, and it applies mostly to young players. Since I’m comparing monthly data to full-year data for batting title and ERA qualifiers, I’m selecting from those players who hung around long enough to compile 502 plate appearances or 162 innings pitched. If you’re a young player who puts up a .298/.461/.596 batting line in April, as Joc Pederson did last April, you get to stick around to get your 502 plate appearances, even though 261 of your plate appearances occurred during July, August, and September, when you hit .170/.300/.284. On the other hand, if you bat .147/.284/.235 in April, as Rougned Odor did, you do get a chance to bat .352/.426/.639 in 124 plate appearances spread between May and June, but you get them in Round Rock instead of Arlington. So there’s a bias in this analysis in favor of players who perform well in April (giving them a chance to continue to play) compared to those who don’t (who may get shipped out). This shouldn’t have a big impact on the overall variability of April data, though, since the presence of early-season outperformers like Pederson who get full-time status on the strength of their April is canceled, to an extent, by early-season underperformers like Odor who don’t.

So is April more predictive than other months? Here’s a chart for batters, using OPS as the measure, comparing the correlation between batters’ full-year performance and that of each month.

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Kenta Maeda makes baseball history, the White Sox make baseball history, and Yasiel Puig just makes the Rockies sad.

The Weekend Takeaway
There isn’t anyone quite like Kenta Maeda. There have been similar pitchers in similar circumstances, and similar feats in similar sample sizes, but no one has done precisely what Maeda pulled off against the Rockies on Saturday evening.


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Starring Jeury Familia. Meanwhile, Craig Kimbrel gets Chris Davis when he gets a second chance, the Rockies put up a Rockies score, and Trevor Story moves on to the next neat trick.

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Trevor Story can't stop hitting home runs, Vince Velasquez nearly pulls off a no-hitter, and Bartolo Colon resurrects the panache of Willie Mays.

The Weekend Takeaway
Both the Padres and the Rockies had something to rejoice over in the 13-6 slugfest on Friday night. It’s been a long, long week in the NL West, especially for the Friars, who had managed to string together 30 scoreless innings to begin the season. Those 13 runs must've felt like an exorcism.


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Three middle infielders are hitting all the home runs.

The Wednesday Takeaway

In 1941, Boston Red Sox second baseman Bobby Doerr started off the season by hitting a homer in each of Boston’s first three games. For 75 years, that was the benchmark for hot-hitting second basemen, until Robinson Cano decided that it was time to meet that benchmark. Cano slugged two homers on Wednesday afternoon against the Rangers—one in the first inning, and another in the top of the ninth inning to cap a five-run comeback that powered the Seattle Mariners to a 9-5 victory over Texas.

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Does Jorge De La Rosa give the Rockies, and their front office, hope for a sustainable future?

In my opinion, our very first BP Local site ought to have gone to the Rockies. For me, sabermetrics ought always to be about seeking challenges, looking for problems sufficient to force us to come up with truly creative solutions, truly new ideas, and truly original problem-solving methods. Baseball is, after all, a trivial thing, and while it’s popular and interesting enough to make for thoroughly worthwhile leisure, I can’t encourage smart people to spend their time and mental energy on the game unless I feel that those people are putting their talents to a noble, global use. Maybe that’s dreaming too big, asking too much of the discipline of sabermetrics, and of the game itself. Still, that’s my approach.

Given that premise, yes, we should be spending way more time on the Rockies. We should be spending a ton of time on the Rockies. For someone who hopes to learn about more than baseball in the process of analyzing the game, the Rockies offer the richest potential case material. They are an expansion franchise (not only historically, but culturally). They are the most consistently lost organization in the league. Of course, they also play in the most extreme and vexing environment in MLB, and that’s where they differentiate themselves. For a quarter century, the Rockies have tried to solve the problem of winning big-league baseball games at unprecedented elevation (without totally flaming out when they have to play elsewhere), and have consistently failed.

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Tim Lincecum's showcase remains somewhere down the road. Meanwhile, James Loney might be coming to a town near you and Trevor Story might be coming to a ROY race near you.

Tim Lincecum wants to be "perfect" for potential showcase
Opening Day is only a few days away, and one notable player who more than likely won’t be ready is free agent pitcher Tim Lincecum. The former Giant, former All-Star, former Cy Young winner, etc., is still working out on his own, and rumors of his big impending showcase have thus far been greatly exaggerated.


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March 28, 2016 6:05 am

Winter Is Leaving

1

R.J. Anderson

No, really: At least Nolan Arenado is fun to watch.

The Rockies are a mess. They’ve finished fourth or fifth in each of the past five seasons; they’ve trailed the division winner by 20 or more games in all but one of those years (when they checked in 18 games back); and last July they traded their face-of-the-franchise shortstop for, among other (admittedly more important, promising) pieces, a veteran who is now suspended indefinitely following a domestic assault arrest. It’s been all downhill since their divisional-round exit in 2009, and provided you trust PECOTA’s 74-win projection, there’s little reason to believe their fortunes will change over the next seven months. You’d almost be justified in ignoring them. Almost.

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February 8, 2016 6:00 am

Tools of Ignorance: Forget It, Jake

7

Jeff Quinton

It's Unconvincingstrategyinlastplacetown.

The Rockies have done some things the past eight months. They did a thing a couple weeks ago. Like most of the things the Rockies have done lately, trading four years of Corey Dickerson for two years of Jake McGee has caused much head-scratching. The reaction to the trade was a combination of said head-scratching and “LOL Rockies” with a splash of “hey, McGee’s really good and his fastball-heavy approach might be a good fit for Coors.” The analyses of the trade all generally led to the conclusion that the Rockies do not really have a plan and that, if they do, it is simply a plan to try and be mediocre.

I do not think that this is likely. If the plan is to be mediocre or there is no plan, then why do anything at all? Why trade Troy Tulowitzki? Why sign an outfielder, just to trade another and add more payroll along the way? To me, these actions and the motivation to be mediocre do not jibe. That said, we can believe that these moves are unlikely to be successes, while having a different theory as to what is motivating this behavior.

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January 27, 2016 9:11 am

Rubbing Mud: The Latest Rockies Identity

5

Matthew Trueblood

With Coors Field presenting a constant challenge, we seem to get a new one every couple years.

It’s hard to believe in the Rockies. In 22 seasons of play, the franchise can boast only seven winning seasons, and three with more than 83 wins. Their next division title will be their first, and just now, their next division title feels very far away. This summer saw them trade, arguably, the best player in franchise history, in order to kickstart a rebuilding effort and make a clearer statement of purpose in that direction. Still, it feels like their deep farm system has to pan out almost perfectly, if they’re to overwhelm the impossibly deep and well-heeled Dodgers, or the hyper-competitive Giants and Diamondbacks any time soon. It’s almost hopeless. Yet, the Rockies made one other change in 2015, aside from trading Troy Tulowitzki, that ought to give you at least a mustard seed of faith in them: the Mountains moved. A lot.

Through 2014, the Rockies were one of the league’s most shift-averse teams. In 2013, they had a shift on when 95 balls were put in play. Only six teams (four in the NL) shifted less often. In 2014, Colorado fielders were shifted on 114 balls in play, which represents hardly any added commitment to the concept, and which (since everyone else in the league was rapidly adopting shifting and installing shifts as vital parts of their run-prevention game plans) was 87 fewer than any other team in baseball.

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One of the Rockies' three incumbents in the outfield is about to roll over.

Orioles, Rockies discussing Colorado’s spare outfielders
The slow-developing outfield market lost another mid-tier free agent Tuesday, when the Rockies agreed to a three-year, $27.5 million deal with Gerardo Parra. Like Denard Span, who signed a three-year, $31 million contract with the Giants last week, Parra represented something of a risk after batting just .237/.268/.357 following a deadline trade to Baltimore. But the Rockies apparently were comfortable writing off that skid to Parra’s mid-year city and league change, investing in him through the 2018 season with a $12 million fourth-year option.

Colorado was always something off an odd fit for Parra, because the Rockies already had plenty of left-handed-hitting outfielders. Nonetheless, rumors tying them to the ex-D’backs outfielder persisted and eventually a deal came to fruition. Now, Walt Weiss has four lefty-swinging outfield regulars for three spots: Charlie Blackmon, Corey Dickerson, and Carlos Gonzalez all bat from that side of the plate, and Brandon Barnes and Kyle Parker are available as right-handed batters off the bench.


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December 23, 2015 11:16 am

Rubbing Mud: Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, Charlie?

1

Matthew Trueblood

How the Rockies Charlie Blackmon is going against history.

It's the time of year to take stock of the things that matter most to us, so while others spend these final days of 2015 confessing hidden feelings for old friends or redoubling their charitable efforts, I've been obsessing more than ever over Charlie Blackmon. Specifically, because it's my perpetual hangup and the thing that first grabbed me about Blackmon, I've been digging into what I consider the most remarkable transformation of 2015: Blackmon’s plate approach.

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