CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Articles Tagged Collisions 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

No Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

What some of the reactions to last week's collision revealed.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Hunter Felt blogs about baseball, basketball and assorted U.S. sports for the The Guardian. He has contributed to Pop Matters and Et tu, Mr. Destructo? He also is occasionally (not) Terry Francona on Twitter in the guise of @NotCoachTito. You can follow him as himself as @HunterFelt where he mainly just makes really snarky jokes about life in Somerville, MA and raves about his kickass girlfriend.
 


Read the full article...

In the wake of some devastating injuries this year, some thoughts on the biggest dangers in the game of baseball today.

Friday night in Colorado, Rockies pitcher Juan Nicasio was struck in the face by a line drive off the bat of Washington Nationals shortstop Ian Desmond. It's unclear to me from reading reports where exactly on his face the ball struck - either on his cheek, near his ear, or at his temple - but the real injury came from his fall. Watching the video it is clear that, once the ball hit his face, Nicasio fell to the ground and landed on the top of his head (imagine someone doing a headstand). After lying on the mound for more than five minutes, Nicasio was placed on a stretcher with a brace around his neck and carted off the field. It was announced Sunday morning that Nicasio had broken the C1 vertebrae in his neck and had had surgery performed overnight.

This is a scary, scary thing. Neck injuries are about as serious as it gets, with paralysis or worse always a possibility. What's more, the line drive that caused everything hit within a baseball's breadth of Nicasio's temple. If either circumstance was even slightly more severe, we could be talking about Major League Baseball's first on-field death in ninety years. And though that may sound like a bit of a stretch - a gloomy, pessimistic, overly cautious stretch - because we know how it turned out, it's very real.

Read the full article...

Ray Fosse, the victim of history's most famous home-plate collision, weighs in on Buster Posey.

OAKLAND—The photograph used to hang in his office. Taken during a game at Fenway Park, the image showed a flowing swing he once called his own, the same swing he spent the rest of his career trying to replicate. He never came close.

Ray Fosse holds the pose now as he stands in an equipment room in the Oakland Coliseum—his head down to watch the ball jump off his bat, his left arm fully extended through the zone, his mind drifting back to the way it all clicked so easily throughout the first half of the 1970 season.

Read the full article...

Some of baseball's most exciting moments are reserved for its most inconsequential plays.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audience, send us your suggestion.

Revisit Jim Baker's humorous look at plays whose prominence outstrips their impact, which originally ran on June 18, 2004.


Read the full article...

Where do you stand on violent collisions at the plate? Should they be outlawed, or are they a part of the game? Before you answer, a warning...

Late Wednesday night, Scott Cousins of the Florida Marlins (likely) ended the season of San Francisco's reigning Rookie of the Year Buster Posey by colliding with Posey on a play at the plate. Posey, who was more in front of the plate than in the basepath, was turning to make the block and apply the tag when Cousins initiated the contact in an effort to get the upper-hand in the collision (from Cousins' point-of-view, Posey was a split second away from squaring up and tagging him out; Cousins did what he thought was necessary to balance the scales). Posey was upended from his spot, his left leg staying stationary under his body as the rest of him flipped over and made wild contortions. As it stands now, Posey is on the 15-day disabled list with a broken bone and strained ligaments.

The conversation around baseball since the collision - from national writers and commenters to bloggers all over the internet to radio hosts and television announcers - has been almost entirely about the injury and the debate over whether home plate collisions should even be allowed in the sport (we even had a similar debate in the comments to Jay Jaffe's piece). Ignoring for the time the fact that Cleveland's Carlos Santana had a very similar injury last season without garnering even a fraction of the attention Posey's injury has received, the debate seems to settle on one of two points. Either the collisions should be outlawed because baseball is not a contact sport and there is no reason to allow a player to be so vulnerable, especially when there is already a rule in place that is meant to keep things like this from happening; or, the plays should be allowed because they are some of the most exciting parts of the game and have been a part of it from the beginning. Rarely does anyone fall on any other side of the issue.

Read the full article...

A comprehensive recap of a big day for FIELDf/x.

I have seen the future, and its name is FIELDf/x. OK, so we kind of knew that. But today, FIELDf/x started to seem a lot more real, and even more exciting than I’d imagined. You may have noticed that BP had a man on the scene at Sportvision’s PITCHf/x summit whose liveblog was actually live. So why am I doing this, when Colin already did? Well, for one thing, Colin arrived fashionably late, and I was all over those first 14 minutes that he missed. For another, his computer died before a lot of the fun started. And for still another (this is a third reason, now), I thought it might be fun to do a Simmons-style quasi-liveblog (written live, published later) that would free me from worries about frequent updates, and allow me to write at length. Most likely that length turned out to be a good deal longer than anyone has any interest in reading, but if you’re determined to catch up on the day’s intriguing events without sitting through eight hours of archived video, you’re welcome to peruse what lies below. If you’d like to follow along, here’s an agenda, and here’s where you should be able to find downloadable presentations in the near future.

Here we are in sunny California, home of the cutest girls in the world, if the Beach Boys are to be believed (I gather there’s also a more recent chart-topper that expresses a similar view). Okay, so by “we,” I mean the attendees at the 3rd (annual?) Sportvision PITCHf/x summit, held at the Westin San Francisco in—you guessed it—San Francisco. I, on the other hand, am watching from the other end of the continent, via a webcast that dubiously claims to be “hi-res,” despite being blurry enough to make deciphering text an adventure (I guess “hi-res” is relative, in the sense that there are even lower resolutions at which it could’ve been streamed). And sure, maybe the Beach Boys weren’t thinking of this particular gathering when they extolled the virtues of California’s beach bunnies. But never mind that—it’s a beautiful Saturday afternoon here in New York, and how better to spend it than to watch a video of some fellow nerds talk about baseball in a dark room some 3,000 miles away? Well, to describe the experience at the same time, of course. Let’s get this quasi-liveblog started.

Read the full article...

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

June 18, 2004 12:00 am

Baseball's Exciting Plays

0

Jim Baker

Baseball exists in two parallel universes. It serves two masters. It has a foot in two worlds. It straddles a fence. It balances on two horses like a rider at an old west show...and so on and so forth. On the one hand, it must entertain its paying customers and viewers. On the other, it is the prime directive of its participants to succeed. Often, these two missions are at odds (although you would never get most of the men inside the game to admit to that). While some plays are completely frustrating on a strategic level, they serve to entertain the paying customer and home viewer. These are, for the most part, the plays that have long been called into question by the analytical sector of the baseball community. Even those of us in that community cannot deny that when they occur, they can be visually dynamic and bring a jolt to the heart while they're happening. It is only afterward, when the dust has settled and the nitro pills we so desperately require have done their good work that we call into question the logic of such moves--no matter how much they may have thrilled the eye while they were underway.

On the one hand, it must entertain its paying customers and viewers. On the other, it is the prime directive of its participants to succeed. Often, these two missions are at odds (although you would never get most of the men inside the game to admit to that).

While some plays are completely frustrating on a strategic level, they serve to entertain the paying customer and home viewer. These are, for the most part, the plays that have long been called into question by the analytical sector of the baseball community. Even those of us in that community cannot deny that when they occur, they can be visually dynamic and bring a jolt to the heart while they're happening. It is only afterward, when the dust has settled and the nitro pills we so desperately require have done their good work that we call into question the logic of such moves--no matter how much they may have thrilled the eye while they were underway.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

No Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries