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Articles Tagged Collective Bargaining Agreement 

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July 9, 2014 6:00 am

Skewed Left: What the CBA Says About the All-Star Game

7

Zachary Levine

Even the All-Star Game gets collectively bargained.

We’re six days from the All-Star Game, an event that despite Major League Baseball’s best marketing efforts, you might think is kind of meaningless. We’re five days away from the Home Run Derby, an event that even when put next to the All-Star Game takes on the air of a sideshow, and rarely in a good way.

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Searching for exceptions in the Collective Bargaining Agreement.

Baseball’s two publically accessible governing constitutions send us scrambling to their pages for very different reasons, and usually with very different results.

If you find yourself heading for the rule book, you’re probably doing so in a state of confusion and probably some anger. When you dive into the much weightier collective bargaining agreement, well, first of all, you’re probably also confused. Let’s face it; readers of this site probably don’t have to look up much of what happens in the flow of the game (in the case of the rule book) or the baseball calendar and off-field choreography (in the case of the CBA). But you might be intrigued by what’s in there anyway.

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The Blue Jays came very close to exceeding their bonus allotment for amateur draft picks.

Under the terms of the new CBA, teams that exceed their annual allotment for amateur draft picks signing bonuses by more than five percent forfeit their first-round pick for the following year. That's a pretty harsh penalty. Up to five percent, though, they simply pay a 75 percent tax on the overage. That might come to a few hundred thousand dollars, which isn't insignificant, but it's nothing compared to the expected value of a first-round pick. So, to recap: going over by less than five percent: potentially costly. Going over by more than five percent: potentially really​ costly.

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Our first look inside the new Collective Bargaining Agreement.

This is Part 1 of a multi-part series on the latest Collective Bargaining Agreement

On November 22 of last year, Major League Baseball and the MLBPA did something that the NFL and the NBA could not: reached a new labor agreement without a work stoppage. For those that follow baseball’s labor history, it has become a miraculous run. By the time the current five-year Basic Agreement (read here) expires on December 1, 2016, it will have been 21 years of uninterrupted labor peace.

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Talking arbitration with long-time baseball arbitrator, professor, and author Roger Abrams.

While looking toward the future with our comprehensive slate of current content, we'd also like to recognize our rich past by drawing upon our extensive (and mostly free) online archive of work dating back to 1997. In an effort to highlight the best of what's gone before, we'll be bringing you a weekly blast from BP's past, introducing or re-introducing you to some of the most informative and entertaining authors who have passed through our virtual halls. If you have fond recollections of a BP piece that you'd like to nominate for re-exposure to a wider audiencesend us your suggestion.

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April 13, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Roger Abrams

0

David Laurila

Talking arbitration with long-time baseball arbitrator, professor, and author, Roger Abrams.

The Richardson Professor of Law at Northeastern University School of Law, Roger Abrams has been a baseball salary arbitrator since 1986. A former scholar-in-residence at the Baseball Hall of Fame, Abrams is the author of four books, including Legal Bases: Baseball and the Law, and Money Pitch: Baseball Free Agency and Salary Arbitration. David talked to Abrams about the baseball arbitration process, including who is eligible, what can and cannot be argued at a hearing, and why arbitration works.

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July 31, 2006 12:00 am

The Ledger Domain: Quietly, Collective Bargaining Begins

0

Maury Brown

With the current CBA expiring in just a few months, the two sides have begun to talk about the next one.

Last Monday, Commissioner Selig was interviewed on XM 175's Baseball Beat with Charley Steiner. The whole transcript was made available to me through XM 175, and within it, there is this exchange:

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June 3, 2003 12:00 am

The New CBA, Part I

0

Doug Pappas

Doug Pappas starts his series on the new Collective Bargaining Agreement today with a look at Articles I-IV. Over the next few weeks he'll explore some of the key clauses in the CBA as well as some of the most important changes made in this latest edition.

The new collective bargaining agreement between the 30 clubs comprising Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association is the ninth in a series which began in 1968. Although the MLBPA was officially organized in 1956, it didn't function as a union for another decade, until Marvin Miller was hired to serve as its full-time executive director in 1966. Judge Robert Cannon, the players' advisor before Miller, got along so well with the owners that he was a serious candidate for Commissioner when Ford Frick retired. Under Cannon, the MLBPA was even funded by the owners, using money from the players' pension fund, in flagrant violation of federal labor law.

One of Miller's first tasks was to formalize the relationships between the owners and the MLBPA, and the terms and conditions of players' employment by the clubs, in a collective bargaining agreement. The first Basic Agreement, as MLB's CBAs have always been officially called, with its provisions retroactive to January 1. As a sign of where the parties stood before the first CBA, one of its provisions eliminated the $30 deposit on their uniforms the players had previously had to pay. Since then, all subsequent CBAs have built on the outline of this original document, rewriting articles to reflect new terms and adding new matters to the end of the document.

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After any article in which I include a toss-off reference to politics, like calling our president "President-by-court-order," I get a lot of email that says, essentially, that I shouldn't talk about politics. For those of you in this group, I'm going to get to baseball here in about four paragraphs. Baseball is steeped in politics. The issues of tax burden and allocation: is it right to build a stadium for a team, and what good (if any) does it for the city? Labor relations and the roles of unions in the modern economy.

After any article in which I include a toss-off reference to politics, like calling our president "President-by-court-order," I get a lot of email that says, essentially, that I shouldn't talk about politics. For those of you in this group, I'm going to get to baseball here in about four paragraphs.

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I was wrong, of course, and in the process of being wrong learned a lot about labor relations, economics, and how those things apply to baseball.

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To test your mettle, we're offering a quiz on contraction. Let's see how closely you've been paying attention and how well you understand the new math that Major League Baseball has unveiled during its current round of labor negotiations.

Let's say—just for the sake of argument, you understand—that you're a die-hard baseball fan and you can't figure out the "new math" propounded by Major League Baseball owners hell-bent on contraction.

Let's say, for the sake of history, that you've got more than a few gray hairs on your noggin, if you have any hair on the old chrome dome at all. (Of course, you could be using Grecian formula, but then you're also probably using Rafael Palmeiro's potion as well and are too busy pitching woo to have any time to think about baseball history.)

Let's say that you actually care about this stuff, that all of this talk about money and drugs and labor negotiations hasn't bugged you so much and made you so cranky that the national pastime no longer fans your interest. I mean, if you listened to the messages emanating from the game's bunker on Park Avenue, you'd think the sky was falling, the barbarians were at the gate, and that western civilization itself was in jeopardy, with the apocalypse nigh.

Welcome, friend, to the Brave New World of Major League Baseball! With just a little time and effort, you'll discover how to reconcile the "best of times, worst of times" messages than are beamed into your home every day.

To test your mettle, we're offering a quiz on contraction. Let's see how closely you've been paying attention and how well you understand the new math that Major League Baseball has unveiled during its current round of labor negotiations.

Answer: a. The commissioner gave an exclusive interview to TSN's Dave Kindred. It was published on TSN.com on June 19. Read it and weep. 

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Sweeney represents the final chance at redemption for David Glass and the Kansas City Royals. For years, Royals fans have been fed the party line that the team had no money with which to pursue free agents, and that story washed down easy for a while, because in its place we were offered the promise of an exciting young ballclub that was built from within, a team that could be competitive without outside help.

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