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Articles Tagged Colby Lewis 

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September 24, 2012 5:00 am

Transaction Analysis: Lewis, Texas Re-Up

1

R.J. Anderson

With an injury hanging over his free agency, Colby Lewis inked an extension with the Rangers

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The Orioles wrap up a bizarrely historic week with a start from Colby Lewis unlike any we've seen before.

The Orioles have had a bizarrely historic week. On Sunday, 1B/DH Chris Davis picked up the first pitching win by a position player in the American League since Rocky Colavito did it in 1968 against the Boston Red Sox. When the Sox sent Darnell McDonald (another former Oriole) to the mound after him in the top of the 17th inning, it was the first time both teams had used a position player as a reliever since 1925, and it was the first time two position players had gotten a decision since 1902. Until Davis's afternoon, a 0-8, 5K, GIDP day at the plate combined with a pitching win hadn't happened since 1905.

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April 16, 2012 3:05 am

Resident Fantasy Genius: Not Time to Panic Over Lincecum

11

Derek Carty

Tim Lincecum's first two starts were ugly, but this could be an opportunity.

During my chat with BP readers last week, there were a number of questions right out of the gate from panicking Tim Lincecum owners and, on the other side of the coin, owners wondering whether they should take advantage of their league’s panicking Lincecum owner.  I gave a brief response, but I wanted to go into more detail today for those who asked during the chat and for those who didn’t have a chance to stop by.

 

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October 28, 2011 10:37 am

World Series Prospectus: Game Six: The Crazy Train Keeps Rolling

54

Jay Jaffe

If you tuned out when the Rangers led 7-5 in the ninth, you missed quite a finish

It was the best worst World Series game—or perhaps the worst best World Series game—I've ever seen. Four and a half hours, 11 innings, 42 players, 19 runs, 23 men left on base, six home runs, five errors, two final-strike comebacks, a handful of bad relief performances, some managerial howlers including a cardinal (not Cardinal) sin… and it all ended with the much-maligned Joe Buck giving a fitting nod to history by emulating one of his father's most famous calls. As David Freese's game-winning blast landed in the grass beyond the center field wall of Busch Stadium, Buck exclaimed, "We'll see you tomorrow night!" Game Six of the 2011 World Series will be remembered as a classic—a Game Six that can sit alongside those of 1975, 1986, and 1991, among maybe a couple others—as the Cardinals staved off elimination to beat the Rangers 10-9, forcing a Game Seven.

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Sizing up every facet of each contender in this season's Fall Classic.

The Breakdown

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After taking a sabbatical in Japan, Lewis has returned to the majors and flourished in the postseason.

Whereas C.J. Wilson pitched his way back into a starting gig while in the Texas bullpen, Colby Lewis had to work out the kinks in a different country after failing to stick in the major leagues. Lewis nearly doubled his career major-league innings total as the Rangers’ third-best starter this year and brought that success with him into the postseason, where he has thrown 18 2/3 innings with an ERA of just 1.45. With the Rangers down two games to none in the World Series against the Giants, Lewis will need to throw another quality start tonight to keep Texas afloat.

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It's a series that will feature superb pitching staffs, and one team will come away with a long-awaited title.

In baseball as in literature, archetypes tend to be formulaic, proof that fiction falls short of reality when it comes to the power to describe any one thing in shorthand. The need, indeed one of the great benefits of the human mind is to identify patterns, and to peg things that fall within those patterns, or to re-evaluate the pattern as a whole to create some new rubric, some new way of explaining things. Take our current post-season slate: instead of a much-anticipated rematch between the Evil Empire and the Phillies' a-bornin' senior-circuit dynasty, last week we got the pleasure of witnessing imperial ambitions utterly overthrown in both leagues.

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It's Wednesday night, and I didn't write my column early because I was watching the Mariners-Athletics game. Now I sit down, feeling a little vindicated for my season-long fight against local anti-Mike Cameron sentiment. The Mariners face the A's again tomorrow, starting Joel Pineiro against Cory Lidle. The Angels have John Lackey facing Colby Lewis. I don't think this particularly unfair to the Mariners; it's not as if they didn't have their chances to beat up on bad teams, or anything. Their pit is one they've dug themselves with crappy pickups and a low-key battle between the manager and GM, where Piniella seems determined to put the awful pieces he's been given (like Jose Offerman) in crucial game situations where their failures are magnified. Gillick in retaliation doesn't care.

It's Wednesday night, and I didn't write my column early because I was watching the Mariners-Athletics game. Now I sit down, feeling a little vindicated for my season-long fight against local anti-Mike Cameron sentiment.

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