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Articles Tagged Clubhouse 

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April 23, 2010 11:15 am

Prospectus Q&A: Tony Franklin

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David Laurila

A baseball lifer and current manager of the Yankees' Double-A club talks about being a minor-league skipper.

The life of a minor-league manager is far from glamorous, but short of holding a similar position in the big leagues, there is little else Tony Franklin would rather do. Currently in his fourth season at the helm in Trenton—the Yankees’ Double-A affiliate—Franklin has been in the game since 1970 when he began his professional career as an infielder in the Reds’ organization. He began his coaching career in 1979 in the Orioles system, and his first managerial job came in 1982 with the short-season Geneva Cubs. Franklin skippered the Thunder to Eastern League titles in 2007 and 2008.

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March 26, 2010 12:07 pm

Spring Conversations

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Kevin Goldstein

The Braves' director of baseball administration talks about his team and its hopes for the upcoming season.

While he might not be the best-known name, John Coppolella has slowly established himself as one of the brighter young front office stars in the game. After seven years with the Yankees in both scouting and baseball operations, he joined the Braves in October, 2006 as the director of baseball administration, where along with assistant GM Bruce Manno, he is a trusted assistant to general manager Frank Wren. I spent time this week talking with John, talking about the upcoming season at both the major- and minor-league level, the differences between working for the Yankees and Braves, as well as some lessons learned from the Mark Teixeira trade. Here is Part One of that interview

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The young Red Sox reliever discusses remaining humble and keeping it light.

One of the most charismatic players in the game, Justin Masterson knows how to win friends and influence people. The Red Sox right-hander also knows how to win games and induce ground balls. A 23-year-old native of Beavercreek, Ohio, Masterson had an outstanding rookie season in 2008, riding his slingshot delivery and bowling-ball sinker to a 6-5 record and 3.16 ERA in 36 regular-season appearances. Entrusted in the set-up role during the postseason, Masterson also excelled in October, allowing only two runs in nine and two-thirds innings. Masterson sat down late in the season to talk about staying humble while he learned on the job, clubhouse chemistry, and why he likes to toy with the Boston media.

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September 7, 2008 12:05 pm

Prospectus Q&A: Cito Gaston

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David Laurila

The once and future Jays manager talks about his return to the dugout, going up to bat with a plan, and rooming with his childhood idol.

Cito Gaston is looking to recapture the glory days in Toronto. The most successful manager in franchise history, having skippered the Blue Jays to World Series titles in 1992 and 1993, Gaston returned for his second tour of duty when he replaced John Gibbons at the helm on June 20. The team's hitting instructor from 1982-1989, and again in 2000-2001, Gaston was serving as a special assistant to the president and CEO at the time of his hiring. An outfielder during his playing days, the 64-year-old Gaston previously managed the Jays from 1989-1997.

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June 8, 2008 12:00 am

Every Given Sunday: Paint Me a Picture

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John Perrotto

Changes of scenery lead to changes in perception, plus news and notes from around the leagues.

It is funny how perception can color the portrait of a baseball player. Miguel Tejada was considered a malcontent last season with the Orioles, as the shortstop was portrayed as moody, a guy who had lost his zest for the game, and one appeared to be on the downside of his career. Astros general manager Ed Wade drew heavy criticism when he traded five players for Tejada last December. Wade came under more fire when Tejada was fingered as a steroid user just one day later, when the Mitchell Report was released. Throw in the fact that ESPN broke the story in April that Tejada is actually two years older than his listed age of 31, and Wade was considered the village idiot of the game's front offices.

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A rocket alights in the Bronx, a tragedy occurs in St. Louis, and Billy Beane wheels and deals in this week's batch of quotables.

I'M NOT THE MAN THEY THINK I AM AT HOME OH NO NO NO

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Spring training brings excitement for everyone but general managers.

"I don't know yet, but it won't be eighth."
--Yankees manager Joe Torre, on where he'll bat Alex Rodriguez in 2007.

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June 15, 2004 12:00 am

Breaking Balls: A New Low

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Derek Zumsteg

I don't get along with my team. We've disagreed over how the team's been run, from who's been put in the lineup to who's being drafting. Since the ownership group bought the team to save it from possibly moving, they've seemed eager to support Bud Selig and MLB in whatever crazy scheme they come up with. I would bet there are many baseball fans with similarly strained relationships with the teams they support. The Mariners have made it clear in the past that they're interested in acquiring only character guys who are good in the clubhouse, even at the expense of the on-field product. Someone ran some numbers and said "Lovable sells." So the clubhouse troublemakers, the lawyers and the quiet smart guys are all purged once the team takes a dislike to them. The problem is that the M's are willing to do almost anything to get rid of players that fans perceive as having negative qualities or being a problem, while at the same time they're willing to pick up good clubhouse guys with baggage if they think they can get away with it. The Mariners will pick up a guy like Al Martin, who got into a nasty tussle with his backup wife in Arizona, resulting in a lot of counseling and a pinch of jail time. Martin, for his potential legal and character issues, was and remains known for having a great work ethic, an easy guy to get along with on a team, and a good clubhouse presence. The Mariners brought in a bigamist who'd bust up a much smaller secondary wife while running their "Refuse to Abuse" campaign against domestic violence...because they wanted a left-handed bat.

The Mariners have made it clear in the past that they're interested in acquiring only character guys who are good in the clubhouse, even at the expense of the on-field product. Someone ran some numbers and said "Lovable sells." So the clubhouse troublemakers, the lawyers and the quiet smart guys are all purged once the team takes a dislike to them.

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