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Articles Tagged Clubhouse Presence 

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Ben and Sam discuss Yadier Molina's career year, catcher defense, and catcher aging, then talk about Omar Vizquel and the point at which clubhouse chemistry can't cancel out poor on-field production.

Ben and Sam discuss Yadier Molina's career year, catcher defense, and catcher aging, then talk about Omar Vizquel and the point at which clubhouse chemistry can't cancel out poor on-field production.

Episode 38: "The Greatness of Yadier Molina and the Not-So-Greatness of Omar Vizquel"

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Looking back at some observations of a late-1980s batboy.

Growing up in a city roughly 250 miles from the nearest Major League Baseball team, I was always jealous of kids living in those cities who were able to go to a big league game practically any night of the week. If only I lived so close to a big league stadium, I'd think, I'd get to see Cal Ripken and Jose Canseco and Ryne Sandberg and everyone else constantly. It was a dream that was only strengthened by articles like "Confessions of a Batboy", published in the September 1991 issue of Beckett Baseball Card Monthly.

In the article, Mark Haas told tales of his five years as the batboy in the visiting team clubhouse of Cleveland Municipal Stadium. Haas won the position in 1985 as a 15-year-old through an essay contest from the Cleveland Plain-Dealer, and held on to the position through the 1990 season. During that time, he got to experience the Bash Brothers, the miracle Twins, the pathetic Orioles, and Hall of Famers like Wade Boggs, Nolan Ryan, and Bert Blyleven from a unique perspective.

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Why the next big step for baseball teams might not be learning something new, but making better use of the information they already have.

“The management and analysis of data, whether it be scouting reports, statistics, medical information or video, is a critical component of our operation. We look forward to developing a customized program that utilizes the most advanced and efficient technology available in the marketplace today to facilitate quicker, easier and more accurate access to all the sources of information we use to make baseball decisions.”—Cubs President of Baseball Operations Theo Epstein, January 2012

“[Statistical analysis] helps but doesn’t tell the whole story of the game. There is a lot of gut feeling you got to make. If you have a stat and see a flashing number and you see that this guy is doing very good against this other guy, you can use that in a game during a key situation. Yes. But we cannot just depend on stats alone. You got to depend on many other things… I don’t like to become a fantasy manager. The goal for a good manager is to have players who are able to manage themselves on the field.”—Unsuccessful Cubs managerial candidate Sandy Alomar Jr., November 2011

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Various people throughout baseball talk about the importance of the Tigers' long-running double play duo.

“Tram” and “Sweet Lou." The longest-running double-play combination in baseball history, Alan Trammell and Lou Whitaker played 1,918 games together from 1977-95, the most ever for American League teammates.  During that time they combined for 11 All-Star berths, seven Gold Gloves, seven Silver Slugger awards, 4,734 hits, and 429 home runs.  They were, quite simply, the heart and soul of the Detroit Tigers for nearly two full decades.

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The reigning American League Rookie of the Year gives a light-hearted lowdown of the diverse personalities in the Athletics' clubhouse.

Andrew Bailey is the reigning American League Rookie of the Year, and he is also one of the game’s most engaging personalities. The Athletics’ closer clearly has a talented right arm, as evidenced by his 1.81 ERA and 40 saves in 98 big-league appearances. Based on his responses to questions about several Oakland teammates, he also possesses a keen and calculated wit.

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Spring training brings excitement for everyone but general managers.

"I don't know yet, but it won't be eighth."
--Yankees manager Joe Torre, on where he'll bat Alex Rodriguez in 2007.

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June 15, 2004 12:00 am

Breaking Balls: A New Low

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Derek Zumsteg

I don't get along with my team. We've disagreed over how the team's been run, from who's been put in the lineup to who's being drafting. Since the ownership group bought the team to save it from possibly moving, they've seemed eager to support Bud Selig and MLB in whatever crazy scheme they come up with. I would bet there are many baseball fans with similarly strained relationships with the teams they support. The Mariners have made it clear in the past that they're interested in acquiring only character guys who are good in the clubhouse, even at the expense of the on-field product. Someone ran some numbers and said "Lovable sells." So the clubhouse troublemakers, the lawyers and the quiet smart guys are all purged once the team takes a dislike to them. The problem is that the M's are willing to do almost anything to get rid of players that fans perceive as having negative qualities or being a problem, while at the same time they're willing to pick up good clubhouse guys with baggage if they think they can get away with it. The Mariners will pick up a guy like Al Martin, who got into a nasty tussle with his backup wife in Arizona, resulting in a lot of counseling and a pinch of jail time. Martin, for his potential legal and character issues, was and remains known for having a great work ethic, an easy guy to get along with on a team, and a good clubhouse presence. The Mariners brought in a bigamist who'd bust up a much smaller secondary wife while running their "Refuse to Abuse" campaign against domestic violence...because they wanted a left-handed bat.

The Mariners have made it clear in the past that they're interested in acquiring only character guys who are good in the clubhouse, even at the expense of the on-field product. Someone ran some numbers and said "Lovable sells." So the clubhouse troublemakers, the lawyers and the quiet smart guys are all purged once the team takes a dislike to them.

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December 10, 2001 12:00 am

HACKING MASS Results

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Baseball Prospectus

We've tabulated this year's HACKING MASS results, and we've got ourselves a winner. Keith Lindahl led his imaginatively named squad to a fantastic 371.76 ESPN to easily capture the 2001 HACKING MASS title. Keith's winning team is a smorgasboard of stiffness:

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