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Articles Tagged Cleveland Indians 

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11-04

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15

Release Points: How Francona Outmaneuvered Maddon and the Cubs ... Almost
by
Dan Rozenson

11-03

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15

Playoff Prospectus: Assessing the Managers' Moves in Game 7
by
Matthew Trueblood

11-03

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6

Playoff Prospectus: The Highlight Reel: World Series Game 7
by
Ashley Varela

11-03

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14

Playoff Prospectus: After 108 Years, Cubs Win the Marathon and the Sprint
by
Aaron Gleeman

11-02

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1

Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and World Series Game 7 Preview
by
Bryan Grosnick

11-02

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Playoff Prospectus: Who Wore It Best?
by
Trevor Strunk

11-02

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8

Playoff Prospectus: Assessing the Managers' Moves in Game 6
by
Jarrett Seidler

11-02

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Playoff Prospectus: The Highlight Reel: World Series Game 6
by
Mauricio Rubio

11-01

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1

Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and World Series Game 6 Preview
by
Aaron Gleeman

10-31

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Playoff Prospectus: The Highlight Reel: World Series Game 5
by
Demetrius Bell

10-31

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5

Playoff Prospectus: Assessing the Managers' Moves in Game 5
by
Matthew Trueblood

10-31

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5

Playoff Prospectus: Spider-Man Heyward
by
Meg Rowley

10-30

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Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and World Series Game 5 Preview
by
Aaron Gleeman

10-30

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Playoff Prospectus: The Highlight Reel: World Series Game 4
by
Ashley Varela

10-30

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Of Errors, Common and Uncommon
by
Rian Watt

10-30

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1

Playoff Prospectus: Wrigley Goes Silent as Indians See the Finish Line
by
Aaron Gleeman

10-29

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0

Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and World Series Game 4 Preview
by
Scooter Hotz

10-29

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Assessing the Managers' Moves in Game 3
by
Rian Watt

10-29

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0

Playoff Prospectus: Who Says You Can't Go Home?
by
Jarrett Seidler

10-29

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0

Playoff Prospectus: The Highlight Reel: World Series Game 3
by
Mauricio Rubio

10-28

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3

Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and World Series Game 3 Preview
by
Aaron Gleeman

10-27

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2

Playoff Prospectus: Cleveland Clunker
by
Meg Rowley

10-27

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6

Players Prefer Presentation: Watching Andrew Miller
by
Meg Rowley

10-26

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0

Playoff Prospectus: The Kluber Clinic
by
Trevor Strunk

10-26

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0

Playoff Prospectus: The Highlight Reel: World Series Game 1
by
Ashley Varela

10-26

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4

Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and World Series Game 2 Preview
by
Mike Gianella

10-26

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3

Playoff Prospectus: Assessing the Managers' Moves in Game 1
by
Matthew Trueblood

10-25

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2

Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and World Series Game 1 Preview
by
Bryan Grosnick

10-25

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9

Playoff Prospectus: World Series Preview: Cubs vs. Indians
by
Aaron Gleeman

10-25

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8

Rubbing Mud: What We Really Know About Lester's Yips
by
Matthew Trueblood

10-24

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9

Flu-Like Symptoms: Andrew Miller Is Not Goose Gossage
by
Rob Mains

10-19

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2

Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and LCS Game Previews
by
Aaron Gleeman

10-19

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Playoff Prospectus: Take a Loss, Save a Bullpen
by
Kate Morrison

10-18

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2

Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and LCS Game Previews
by
Bryan Grosnick

10-18

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3

Playoff Prospectus: Postseason (Or At Least Indians) Magic
by
Trevor Strunk

10-17

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Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and ALCS Game 3 Preview
by
Jeff Quinton

10-16

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1

Playoff Prospectus: Terry Francona and The Funky Bunch
by
Ashley Varela

10-15

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Playoff Prospectus: Turning Down the Volume
by
Rob Mains

10-14

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3

Playoff Prospectus: ALCS Preview: Blue Jays vs. Indians
by
Matthew Trueblood

10-11

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3

Playoff Prospectus: Going Out With a Walk
by
Brett Cowett

10-08

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2

Playoff Prospectus: Proof, Gargoyles, and David Price
by
Matt Collins

10-07

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1

Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and ALDS Game 2 Previews
by
Aaron Gleeman

10-07

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3

Playoff Prospectus: Terry Francona, Leverage King
by
Matthew Kory

10-06

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Playoff Prospectus: PECOTA Odds and ALDS Game 1 Previews
by
Kate Morrison and Matthew Trueblood

09-28

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5

Banjo Hitter: The Derek Falvey Era
by
Aaron Gleeman

09-02

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1

Transaction Analysis: Bourn Again
by
Bryan Grosnick and Steve Givarz

08-19

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2

Rubbing Mud: These Post-Lucroy Indians
by
Matthew Trueblood

08-05

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What You Need to Know: This Is How You Use Andrew Miller
by
Nicolas Stellini

08-02

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What You Need to Know: Soft-Tossin' Salazar
by
Daniel Rathman

08-01

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Transaction Analysis: Indians Get Their Guy(er)
by
Christopher Crawford and Dustin Palmateer

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Field Marshal Terry Francona vs. Generalissimo Joe Maddon.

Imagine you are Field Marshal Terry Francona, lined up for battle with your 50 divisions behind you. You and your troops have fought well, having just defeated skilled armies from Boston and Toronto. But your nemesis now is Generalissimo Joe Maddon, who has 70 divisions to throw at you. Picture these two armies fighting over seven separate battlefields—first to seize four fields wins. What’s an underdog to do?

Suppose Maddon puts 10 divisions into position for each battle. Francona could mirror his opponent and evenly spread his forces, but he would be outnumbered all along his front. Or, he could do what outnumbered commanders have done for a long time: concentrate his forces selectively.

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Ten innings of high-stakes lever-pulling from Joe Maddon and Terry Francoa.

There’s real freedom in a Game 7. A manager has just one imperative: win this game. Even in a Game 6, a skipper will draw criticism (and perhaps do genuine damage) if he makes a poor decision with regard to some future contest. Just ask Joe Maddon. He entered Wednesday night’s winner-take-all contest with the strange usage of Aroldis Chapman in Game 6 hanging around his neck, and the daunting task of getting 27 outs with a bullpen he largely didn’t trust. Since it was Game 7, though, he had a path to that destination.

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One of the best, wildest games in World Series history.

One hundred and eight years after the Cubs last held the title of World Champions, 212 days after the first pitch of the 2016 season, and 26 days after the Cubs took the postseason by storm, Game 7 of the World Series unfolded exactly as predicted: with a rain-delayed, three-homer, 10-inning, heart-pounding win.

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Lovable losers no more.

Baseball’s regular season is often described as a marathon. Six months of nearly uninterrupted, daily competition during which a single win or loss--or even a few of them consecutively--barely registers as noteworthy within the context of a 162-game schedule. It’s part of the sport’s charm, as games feel more like daily rituals than special events. And then the postseason arrives and that entire perspective shifts. Each game suddenly takes on huge importance and each win or loss is analyzed within an inch of its life. That, too, is part of the sport’s charm--to spend so long leisurely cruising down a road only to realize it was a runway and you’re airborne.

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Kyle Hendricks vs. Corey Kluber, in Cleveland.

Everything ends. Tonight, not only does the 2016 baseball season come to its long-awaited conclusion, but one team will end a championship drought spanning a period of time best served by using the term “century.” For Cleveland, that is “almost a century”–68 years. For Chicago, that is “over a century”--a reign of error that has cemented itself in the annals of baseball history unlike any other.

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Addison Russell's grand slam broke it open, but several smaller moments led to the Indians' undoing in Game 6.

In any baseball game that ends with a score of 9-3, especially any World Series game that ends with a score of 9-3, the central question any casual spectator is inevitably going to have is “so when did it turn from a close call into a laugher?” This question, more than any other, defines the blowout win or loss, since it gives an idea of how truly one-sided the game was. Did the winning team jump out to a 9-0 lead in the first and never look back? Or was this a 1-1 game until the eighth inning when some bullpen mismanagement turned a leftover smoldering campfire into Chernobyl?

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November 2, 2016 6:00 am

Playoff Prospectus: Assessing the Managers' Moves in Game 6

8

Jarrett Seidler

Did the Cubs and Joe Maddon win the battle, but set themselves up to lose the war?

Cubs manager Joe Maddon only made one truly impactful move in the larger story of the series in Game 6. With a 7-2 lead and two on with two outs in the seventh inning—a fairly low-leverage spot, likely to produce even lower leverage eighth and ninth innings—Aroldis Chapman entered the game. Maddon likely could’ve made it all the way through using his medium-leverage pitchers like Carl Edwards Jr., Pedro Strop, Travis Wood, and Hector Rondon, and of course saving Chapman at that exact moment hardly precluded asking him to pitch later if a higher-leverage situation arose.

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Kris Bryant has No Problem with the curve

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Jake Arrieta vs. Josh Tomlin, in Cleveland.

November baseball!

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Flame-throwers, tip drills, and some life at Wrigley Field.

John Smoltz knows a thing or two about big moments in October baseball, to say the least. The Hall of Famer-turned-commentator set the table for the viewing audience in the bottom of the fourth inning last night by basically saying that the Cubs had to score in that frame or they’d be in serious trouble.

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October 31, 2016 7:10 am

Playoff Prospectus: Assessing the Managers' Moves in Game 5

5

Matthew Trueblood

Neither manager came through Game 5 with flying colors, but Joe Maddon out-maneuvered Terry Francona.

There's a temptation, whenever a team is facing the prospect of its season ending in bitter playoff defeat, to expect decisive action and bold strokes. Some glass must be broken; this is an emergency.

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For one night at least Jason Heyward put memories of a bad 2016 behind him, helping the Cubs keep their season alive.

I can’t imagine becoming suddenly, publicly bad at something. Not that I can’t imagine being suddenly bad at something; I just can’t imagine that newfound badness mattering much to anyone. Our failures have consequences, but rarely do we have to answer for them in the village square. Sustained failure is the stuff that gets us fired, or dings our credit rating. It becomes a fact of our biographies that we aren’t proud of and may elect to fib over at Thanksgiving, but after the uncomfortable shifting in our chairs is over, people forget. You care that you lost your job, but your paperboy doesn’t.

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