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Articles Tagged Chemistry 

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Ben and Sam talk about some recent conflicts between veterans and young players, then discuss Don Mattingly's comments about the Dodgers' lack of grit.



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April 4, 2013 5:00 am

In A Pickle: Can You Buy What You Can't See?

9

Jason Wojciechowski

Just because teams can't necessarily measure clutchness and chemistry doesn't mean they don't have to think about how to buy it.

Baseball knowledge expands rapidly, inside the organized professional realm and out. We know things about outfield defense and batted balls and catcher pitch-receiving and pitcher skill and the best way to score a run that we did not know 10, 20, 50 years ago. There is also plenty we do not know, sometimes particular to baseball and sometimes dealing with general human knowledge as applied to baseball. (Think about questions of psychology, for instance.) The question, or one of the questions, if you're in a front office, is how these areas of knowledge intersect with your willingness to pay D dollars for player P.

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Ben and Sam talk about Tim McCarver's impending retirement and share their thoughts on broadcasting, then discuss whether changes in players' routines have reduced the importance of clubhouse chemistry.



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An attempt to quantify the effect a good clubhouse guy has on his teammates.

Brandon McCarthy thinks that Brandon Inge is worth 10 wins or so to a team behind closed doors. Jonny Gomes, too. Participating in a player panel at the SABR Analytics Conference earlier this month, McCarthy posited that if Inge and Gomes had been removed from the 2012 Oakland A's, they might have fallen from a 94-win team to a 70-win team, purely by virtue of being deprived of the effect the two players had in the clubhouse. According to WARP, Gomes was worth 2.2 wins last year, while Inge was worth 0.6. So, assuming that if neither had been on the team, they would have been replaced by... well, replacement level players, that means that Inge and Gomes somehow combined for 21.2 wins just by being good guys in the clubhouse.

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February 26, 2013 5:00 am

Baseball Therapy: Can't Buy Me Chemistry?

10

Russell A. Carleton

Do teams that stick together win together more often than high-turnover teams?

My wife and I have been married for seven and a half years. We dated for four years before that. There are days when it's eerie how in sync we are. We've gotten to the point where someone will say something and we’ll both look up and smile knowingly at each other because we’re both aware that the other's mind just went to the same obscure song lyric from 15 years ago. Yeah, I think we have some chemistry going.

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February 11, 2013 5:00 am

Baseball Therapy: How to Measure Clubhouse Chemistry

25

Russell A. Carleton

How one might go about quantifying the heretofore unquantifiable.

This one is dedicated to the memory of my father-in-law, himself a biochemist. I once tried explaining baseball and sabermetrics to him (he was from Russia). He thought it was nice that I had such an interesting hobby. He will be missed.

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Ben and Sam discuss Yadier Molina's career year, catcher defense, and catcher aging, then talk about Omar Vizquel and the point at which clubhouse chemistry can't cancel out poor on-field production.

Ben and Sam discuss Yadier Molina's career year, catcher defense, and catcher aging, then talk about Omar Vizquel and the point at which clubhouse chemistry can't cancel out poor on-field production.

Episode 38: "The Greatness of Yadier Molina and the Not-So-Greatness of Omar Vizquel"

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An alternative explanation for their lack of success since the big trade.

So, Ken Rosenthal laid down the gauntlet this morning:

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Ben and Sam reach a milestone (the 20-minute mark) as they tackle the topics of clubhouse chemistry and whether there's more to Jeff Mathis than meets the eye.

Ben and Sam reach a milestone (the 20-minute mark) as they tackle the topics of clubhouse chemistry and whether there's more to Jeff Mathis than meets the eye. 

Effectively Wild Episode 21: "Typewriter"

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June 10, 2008 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: The State of the Orioles

0

Joe Sheehan

Some surprise feedback on an earlier column prompts a closer look at the Orioles, though the outcome's not so different.

The Internet is a funny place.

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In the entire history of the World Series, just 11 teams have even tied games in which they trailed by more than one run in the ninth inning. Just four of those teams won the game in which they came back: the 1911 Giants (Game 5), the 1929 A's (Game 5), the 1939 Yankees (Game 4), and the 1985 Cardinals (Game 2).

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On October 8, 1995, I sat in shocked silence as Edgar Martinez broke my heart, lining a double into the left-field corner of the Kingdome, eliminating the Yankees from the playoffs and ending the career of my all-time favorite player, Don Mattingly.

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