CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Articles Tagged Carlos Santana 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives

05-28

comment icon

2

Fantasy Freestyle: Will Carlos Santana Heat Up?
by
Craig Goldstein

02-27

comment icon

13

Skewed Left: What it Means to Move Off Catcher
by
Zachary Levine

02-18

comment icon

0

Rumor Roundup: Looking for Lefty Relief
by
Daniel Rathman

01-23

comment icon

5

Minor League Update: International Winter League Games of January 22
by
Jeff Moore

01-17

comment icon

18

Dynasty League Positional Rankings: Top 50 Catchers
by
Bret Sayre

01-17

comment icon

12

TTO Scoresheet Podcast: Catchers
by
Ian Lefkowitz, Ben Murphy and Jared Weiss

01-16

comment icon

4

Tale of the Tape: Jonathan Lucroy vs. Carlos Santana
by
Alex Kantecki

01-16

comment icon

20

Fantasy Three-Year Projections: Catchers
by
Paul Sporer

01-14

comment icon

13

Fantasy Tier Rankings: Catchers
by
Mike Gianella

01-13

comment icon

7

Fantasy Players to Target: Catchers
by
BP Fantasy Staff

01-06

comment icon

0

Minor League Update: International Winter League Games of January 3-5
by
Jeff Moore

11-27

comment icon

13

Fantasy Team Preview: Cleveland Indians
by
Craig Goldstein and Bret Sayre

10-23

comment icon

15

Baseball ProGUESTus: Finding a Way to Walk off the Island
by
Jorge Arangure Jr.

08-30

comment icon

15

In A Pickle: Carlos Santana, and the Choice of a Generation
by
Jason Wojciechowski

06-06

comment icon

2

Collateral Damage Daily: Wednesday, April 6
by
Corey Dawkins

04-12

comment icon

4

Transaction Analysis: Second Acts for Second Basemen
by
R.J. Anderson

02-07

comment icon

16

Fantasy Beat: BP Scoresheet Early Draft Prep
by
Rob McQuown

11-20

comment icon

34

Future Shock: Indians Top 11 Prospects
by
Kevin Goldstein

04-23

comment icon

31

Checking the Numbers: Inside Pitch-f/x
by
Eric Seidman

04-05

comment icon

0

Preseason Predictions
by
Baseball Prospectus

11-02

comment icon

0

Internet Baseball Awards
by
Greg Spira

10-31

comment icon

0

Internet Baseball Awards
by
Baseball Prospectus

09-12

comment icon

0

Prospectus Game of the Week: Detroit Tigers @ Minnesota Twins, September 10, 2006
by
Derek Jacques

09-01

comment icon

0

Crooked Numbers: In Reverse
by
James Click

07-14

comment icon

0

Mid-Season Baseball Awards
by
Ryan Wilkins

10-28

comment icon

0

Internet Baseball Awards
by
Ryan Wilkins

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

May 28, 2014 6:00 am

Fantasy Freestyle: Will Carlos Santana Heat Up?

2

Craig Goldstein

The Indians catcher-turned-third baseman has scuffled through two months, but there are reasons to be optimistic.

The Indians, fresh off a Wild Card Game appearance in 2013, are in last place in the AL Central. While no one player is to blame for the team's struggles, Carlos Santana's early-season woes are eye-catching. Everyone expected Santana, who has transitioned to third base after spending his first four seasons at catcher, to struggle on defense. Yet nobody anticipated his .159/.327/.301 slash line through 220 plate appearances. The question at hand then, for the Indians and for fantasy owners alike, is whether Santana will be a productive player from this point on. The answer, as it so happens, is yes.

The biggest pimple on the oily face that is Santana’s batted-ball data is the lack of line drives. Santana is no stranger to low line drive rates—regularly producing below the league-average—but his 11.7 percent clip in 2014 would represent a new career-low. The line drives he’s missing have mostly turned into ground balls, though his fly ball rate has increased as well. He's maintained a 20-homer pace because his home-run-per-fly-ball rate has remained static even with the increase in fly balls.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 27, 2014 6:00 am

Skewed Left: What it Means to Move Off Catcher

13

Zachary Levine

How have players who've changed positions from catcher (like Joe Mauer and Carlos Santana) historically tended to do?

One of the favorite storylines this time of year is the positional change, whether it’s putting on an entirely different kind of glove or just moving over a few dozen feet to the left or right. Predicting performance changes is hard, but a positional change is something we can see, so it’s something we can write.

One of the least-favorite storylines—or at least most confusing—is when a positional change comes with a promise that the player will be able to improve on offense because he can spend more time working on it.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

February 18, 2014 6:00 am

Rumor Roundup: Looking for Lefty Relief

0

Daniel Rathman

Checking in on Oliver Perez' availability and Carlos Santana's transition to third base.

Four teams in on Oliver Perez
Two years ago, the Mariners revived Oliver Perez’s major-league career by moving him to the bullpen. He ended up spending two seasons in Seattle, the latter on a one-year, $1.5 million contract that he signed on November 3, 2012, less than five months after the Mariners brought him back to the Show. But the 32-year-old’s stay in the Emerald City might be over, with four teams in the running to become his next employer.

Cafardo believes that Perez could choose his team in the coming days so that he can report to camp and catch up with the pitchers who settled in last week. The four teams that are courting him remain a mystery, but Bob Dutton, who covers the Mariners for the Tacoma News Times, hasn’t heard anything to suggest that he might be back. First-year manager Lloyd McClendon already has a couple of lefties at his disposal in Charlie Furbush and Lucas Luetge, and the Mariners invited Joe Beimel and Randy Wolf to camp to compete for jobs.


The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Notes on prospects and big leaguers playing abroad, including Brewers shortstop Yadiel Rivera and Indians catcher Carlos Santana.

Prospects

Yadiel Rivera, SS, Brewers (Criollos de Caguas, PRWL): 1-1. It was a slow night in the Caribbean with only two games between the three leagues, so coming in as a defensive replacement and getting a hit gets you on the list today. Plus, the Brewers system needs all the love it can get. Rivera is a plus defender at shortstop, which gives him a chance to emerge as a legitimate prospect if he can improve his bat even a little bit.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

January 17, 2014 6:32 am

Dynasty League Positional Rankings: Top 50 Catchers

18

Bret Sayre

From Buster Posey to Christian Bethancourt, this list is loaded with both big leaguers and high-upside prospects.

The Primer:
Because dynasty league rankings are relatively league dependent, I set up parameters for ranking the players below (and the ones who will follow at other positions). The list here presupposes a 16-team standard dynasty format, in which there are no contracts/salaries, players can be kept forever, and owners have minor-league farm systems in which to hoard prospects. Feel free to adjust this as necessary for your individual league, whether it’s moving non-elite prospects without 2014 ETAs down if you don’t have separate farm teams or moving lower-risk, lower-reward players up in deeper mixed or league–only formats.

The catcher position is a tricky one, as there are a lot of players at or near the top of the list who may be playing another position in three or so years. That, plus with most leagues using one active catcher, prospects are featured a little more prominently due to both the major-league depth right now and the fact that there are diminishing returns to carrying too many backstops.


The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

In the debut edition of the Three True Outcomes podcast, our fantasy crew looks at catchers for Scoresheet leagues.

Welcome to BP’s take on Scoresheet fantasy baseball. Scoresheet, for those unfamiliar, is a type of fantasy baseball in which your drafted team plays simulated games each week against other teams in your league, with your players’ performance depending on how they played in real life that week—but not entirely, unlike in a roto or head-to-head league. Other differences from most roto leagues include the importance of real-life fielding ability and a tendency for rosters to be rather deep. While many Scoresheet leagues have their own unique quirky rules, most allow players to be kept for an indefinite number of years, and allow rookies to be kept very cheaply. For non-Scoresheet players in deep or dynasty leagues, we urge you to check out BP’s new TINO podcast, but after you listen to that, we think we will be able to provide some supplementary value as well. Or, better yet, sign up for a Scoresheet team to explore a whole new world of fantasy baseball.

We want to thank BP for this chance to contribute to their suite of fantasy baseball offerings. Our goal is for the weekly column and podcast to complement each other. Both will cover similar ground and maybe even the same jokes. But we believe reading the article will make the podcast more meaningful. And vice versa. In upcoming weeks we look forward to joining in the BP Fantasy fun by taking a position-by-position look at the upcoming season, starting with catcher this week. We’ve got lots more planned after that, but if there’s anything you’d like us to tackle, please feel free to contact us @TTOScoresheet on Twitter or at scoresheet@threetrueoutcomes.com

Read the full article...

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

January 16, 2014 6:10 am

Tale of the Tape: Jonathan Lucroy vs. Carlos Santana

4

Alex Kantecki

This showdown between 27-year-old catchers might be closer than you think.

Today’s “Tale of the Tape” focuses on a pair of 27-year-old catchers from a pair of midwestern cities: Cleveland’s Carlos Santana and Milwaukee’s Jonathan Lucroy. Both finished 2013 as top-five catchers sans Victor Martinez, with the Brewer getting the better of the Indian (no. 3 to no. 5). While that might surprise some people given Santana’s pedigree as a top-flight prospect and Lucroy’s quiet ascent to the top, that doesn’t mean one is overrated and one is underrated. Both catchers are in their primes and should continue to provide top-five upside in 2014; today’s exercise examines who has a better chance of finishing the season on top. Mike Gianella lists Santana and Lucroy as four-star players and ranks them back-to-back at no. 4 and no. 5, respectively, so choosing between the two on draft day could come down to a matter of personal preference.

Batting Average
One look at the career batting averages of Lucroy and Santana makes it clear: Lucroy holds the decisive edge. Lucroy’s .279 career BA dwarfs Santana’s .254, albeit in 410 fewer plate appearances. Dragging Santana’s career average down is a .239 showing in 2011; he rebounded with a .252 mark the following season and even more so with a .268 average in 2013. Lucroy, meanwhile, added 55 points to his .265 in 2011, hitting .320 in 2012 before coming down to earth with a .280 average last year. Lucroy also holds a decisive advantage with a career .306 BABIP (compared to .281 for Santana), and his contact rates are far superior. Additionally, there’s a clear edge among the duo’s strikeout rates—especially when it comes to last season (11.9 percent for Lucroy, 17.1 percent for Santana). Lucroy’s batting average is his greatest advantage.


The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

January 16, 2014 6:10 am

Fantasy Three-Year Projections: Catchers

20

Paul Sporer

A look at how catchers stack up for fantasy purposes between now and 2016.

Everyone in fantasy sports loves to look ahead. Even in the throes of a pennant race, you can fire up a conversation about next year’s first round and it will go on for an hour. With that in mind, the BP fantasy team will be taking a long-view look at every position this offseason with three-year rankings (composite value over the next three seasons). Since it is Catcher Week, the backstops will kick things off. Catchers are particularly difficult to project over a three-year period because you have guys that shift off of the position entirely while the learning curve for young guys is so sharp given all of their defensive duties.

With Joe Mauer done at the position after this year, he’s not going to rank on the list, as even a first-place finish this year wouldn’t be enough. Meanwhile there is some projection to be done with guys who could move off the position so you will see some of those guys much lower than you might anticipate since I have them delivering zero value at the position in year three.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

Buster Posey and Joe Mauer headline a large group of high-end backstops, followed by thinner groupings below.

Today we kick off our positional tier rankings. For the second year in a row, we have made this into a collaborative effort. Players at each position will be divided into five tiers, represented by the number of stars.

Five-star players are the studs at their position. In general, they are the players that will be nabbed in the first couple of rounds of the draft, and they'll fetch auction bids in excess of $30. Four-star players are a cut below the studs at the position. They will also be earl- round selections, and they're projected to be worth more than $20 in most cases. Three-star players are the last tier in which players are projected to provide double-digit dollar value in auctions, and two-star players are projected to earn single digits in dollar value in auctions. One-star players are late-round sleepers and roster placeholders. The positional tiers aren't simply a regurgitation of last year’s values but rather try to offer some insights into what we expect will happen in 2014.

Read the full article...

Notes from the fantasy staff on several backstops you should consider selecting in your drafts this spring.

As our eminent leader Bret Sayre outlined in the Baseball Prospectus draft prep guide, the fantasy staff here at BP is aiming to bring you a comprehensive look at each and every position on a weekly basis. From prospects to veterans, superstars to scrubs and sleepers to potential busts, we want you to have a thorough understanding of every player at every position when you hit your drafts this winter and next spring.

With that in mind, we’ve polled the fantasy staff here for a player to target and a player to avoid for each position, to run every Monday and Friday, respectively. We don’t always agree on every player, which is why you’ll see some names pop up more than once, but we hope those debates give you even more insight as to who you should or shouldn’t select on draft day.

Read the full article...

Notes on prospects, big leaguers, and former big leaguers playing abroad.

Friday, January 3rd

The Good

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Fantasy article. To read it, sign up today!

November 27, 2013 6:00 am

Fantasy Team Preview: Cleveland Indians

13

Craig Goldstein and Bret Sayre

Jason Kipnis, Carlos Santana, and Danny Salazar headline a roster whose complementary players could be appealing in deeper formats.

Coming off their first playoff appearance since blowing a 3-1 lead in the 2007 ALCS, the Indians will look to get back to the Promised Land (if you can call a one-game playoff the Promised Land). And they’ll have to do it with two of their three best pitchers from last season, Ubaldo Jimenez and Scott Kazmir, potentially departing. The lineup remains intact, though they have added underrated outfielder David Murphy so that they don’t have to give nearly 500 plate appearances to Drew Stubbs again.

Yes, the Indians are a better franchise now than they were 25 years ago when they had Ricky Vaughn and Jake Taylor in uniform, but that element that causes us not to take them seriously as a World Series contender still exists. They have a couple of strong, underrated players about to enter their primes in Jason Kipnis and Carlos Santana, but they’ll need others to step up and join them on that stage to make a deep playoff push. With the Tigers improving their roster (and flexibility) by trading for Ian Kinsler and the Royals possibly on the rise, the Indians will have their hands full in the AL Central.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

<< Previous Tag Entries No More Tag Entries