CSS Button No Image Css3Menu.com

Baseball Prospectus home
  
  
Click here to log in Click here for forgotten password Click here to subscribe

Premium and Super Premium Subscribers Get a 20% Discount at MLB.tv!

Articles Tagged California League 

Search BP Articles

All Blogs (including podcasts)

Active Columns

Authors

Article Types

Archives
No Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

October 14, 2006 12:00 am

Prospectus Today: LCS, Day Four

0

Joe Sheehan

The NLCS becomes a battle just as the ALCS is edging towards an end.

\nMathematically, leverage is based on the win expectancy work done by Keith Woolner in BP 2005, and is defined as the change in the probability of winning the game from scoring (or allowing) one additional run in the current game situation divided by the change in probability from scoring\n(or allowing) one run at the start of the game.'; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_18 = 'Adjusted Pitcher Wins. Thorn and Palmers method for calculating a starters value in wins. Included for comparison with SNVA. APW values here calculated using runs instead of earned runs.'; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_19 = 'Support Neutral Lineup-adjusted Value Added (SNVA adjusted for the MLVr of batters faced) per game pitched.'; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_20 = 'The number of double play opportunities (defined as less than two outs with runner(s) on first, first and second, or first second and third).'; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_21 = 'The percentage of double play opportunities turned into actual double plays by a pitcher or hitter.'; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_22 = 'Winning percentage. For teams, Win% is determined by dividing wins by games played. For pitchers, Win% is determined by dividing wins by total decisions. '; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_23 = 'Expected winning percentage for the pitcher, based on how often\na pitcher with the same innings pitched and runs allowed in each individual\ngame earned a win or loss historically in the modern era (1972-present).'; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_24 = 'Attrition Rate is the percent chance that a hitters plate appearances or a pitchers opposing batters faced will decrease by at least 50% relative to his Baseline playing time forecast. Although it is generally a good indicator of the risk of injury, Attrition Rate will also capture seasons in which his playing time decreases due to poor performance or managerial decisions. '; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_25 = 'Batting average (hitters) or batting average allowed (pitchers).'; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_26 = 'Average number of pitches per start.'; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_27 = 'Average Pitcher Abuse Points per game started.'; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_28 = 'Singles or singles allowed.'; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_29 = 'Batting average; hits divided by at-bats.'; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_30 = 'Percentage of pitches thrown for balls.'; xxxpxxxxx1160835748_31 = 'The Baseline forecast, although it does not appear here, is a crucial intermediate step in creating a players forecast. The Baseline developed based on the players previous three seasons of performance. Both major league and (translated) minor league performances are considered.

The rest of this article is restricted to Baseball Prospectus Subscribers.

Not a subscriber?

Click here for more information on Baseball Prospectus subscriptions or use the buttons to the right to subscribe and get access to the best baseball content on the web.


Cancel anytime.


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!


That's a 33% savings over the monthly price!

Already a subscriber? Click here and use the blue login bar to log in.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

March 21, 2006 12:00 am

Future Shock: California, Here They Come

0

Kevin Goldstein

Kevin takes a closer look at the Class A California League, and how its extreme offensive environments make raw performances look more impressive than they truly are.

Of the 14 teams that have their Low Class A affiliate in the Midwest League, eight have their High Class A affiliate in the California League, a very different offensive environment for young hitters and pitchers. The dramatic change in the California League leads to plenty of performances which look like growth, owing the the way the League as a whole inflates offense. Taking a step back and looking at the broader picture, however, shows that one needs to evaluate more than just raw statistics to determine the difference between a true offensive breakout season and one that is a product of the California League.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

June 23, 2004 12:00 am

Can Of Corn: High-A All-Stars

0

Dayn Perry

You've stumbled into the midst of a series on this year's minor league All-Stars. These aren't, part and parcel, the ones you'll find on the various and sundry All-Star teams that will soon be squaring off against one another around the minors. Rather, these are the prospects who should be regarded as the luminaries of the minor leagues, at least according to this particular pontificator. Last week, I cobbled together my Low-A All-Star Team, and if you'd like further ruminations on my methodology for making these selections you should go check out that article. I'll wait here. Otherwise, here's my High-A All-Star ballot. And by "High-A," I mean the best of the California, Carolina and Florida State Leagues...

Last week, I cobbled together my Low-A All-Star Team, and if you'd like further ruminations on my methodology for making these selections you should go check out that article. I'll wait here.

The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

June 18, 2004 12:00 am

A Look at the California League

0

Michael Wolverton

Brad Sullivan, RHP, Age 22; A's 1st round pick in 2003 out of the University of Houston 2004 Stats: 64 IP, 39 SO, 23 BB, 4.92 RA Sullivan was a strikeout machine in college, but he's been anything but in his brief pro career. His velocity is reportedly down from his days in Houston--he topped out at 91 the night I saw him--and he's striking out a mere 14% of California League batters this season, an abysmal percentage for any pitcher, let alone a power guy. The Matt Cain/Sullivan matchup I saw was an interesting contrast in pitching motions. As I wrote Wednesday, Cain's motion was smooth and easy, with lots of leg drive. Sullivan's delivery seemed much more effortful, with a lower arm slot and a very heavy whip of the arm as he throws. It's a similar delivery to fellow ex-Cougar Ryan Wagner (although not at Wagner's level on the painful-just-to-watch scale). It's too early to give up on Sullivan--he's in the perfect organization for developing minor league pitchers--but at the moment he looks like the latest casualty of college overuse.

Modesto A's (Oakland affiliate)

  • Brad Sullivan, RHP, Age 22; A's 1st round pick in 2003 out of the University of Houston
    2004 Stats: 64 IP, 39 SO, 23 BB, 4.92 RA
  • The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

    This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

    June 16, 2004 12:00 am

    A Look at the California League

    0

    Michael Wolverton

    It's hard to beat minor league baseball for a low-cost, low-hassle evening at the ballpark. I've been spending quite a few of my evenings lately in California League parks, mostly checking out teams in that league's Northern division. Today and Friday I'll run down some of the prospects on the five teams in that division, covering the High-A affiliates for the Giants, Rangers, A's, Rockies, and Devil Rays. There's no rigorous method for choosing prospects listed here. In particular, the omission of certain players (like Vince Sinisi and John Hudgins in today's piece) shouldn't be read as a dismissal of them as prospects.

    There's no rigorous method for choosing prospects listed here. In particular, the omission of certain players (like Vince Sinisi and John Hudgins in today's piece) shouldn't be read as a dismissal of them as prospects.

    San Jose Giants (San Francisco affiliate)

    The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

    This is a BP Premium article. To read it, sign up for Premium today!

    February 11, 2004 12:00 am

    Transaction Analysis: January 12-February 6, 2004

    0

    Christina Kahrl

    The Braves strike NRI gold with Russell Branyan. The Astros do what they need to do to compete in the NL Central. Everything you ever wanted to read about Eric Karros. The Padres address their chasm in center. These and other news, notes, and Kahrlisms in today's Transaction Analysis.

    The remainder of this post cannot be viewed at this subscription level. Please click here to subscribe.

    Let's check out the Florida State and California Leagues.

    Happy Friday, all.

    Read the full article...

    July 3, 2001 12:00 am

    Touring the Minors

    0

    Keith Scherer

    Both teams appear to be in stasis. That's not the case. A review of each organization's minor-league system reveals that the Padres are improving much faster than their major-league record suggests, and the Tigers are at long last proceeding, if slowly, and if perhaps too slowly to catch up to the Indians, White Sox, and Twins.

    San Diego Padres

    Read the full article...

    March 5, 2001 12:00 am

    Lost in America

    0

    Keith Scherer

    Following the 2000 season, the minor leagues underwent dozens of changes. Organizations changed their affiliations within leagues, moved their affiliates from one league to another, and jumped and bumped teams between levels. Along with the reconfigurations, there will be several new parks throughout the minor leagues. What follows below is a delineation of the changes, along with an attempt to anticipate what effects those changes might have.

    Most of the changes occurred at the lower levels. At any level, the talent matters more than the park or league. That's especially true for the low minors, where the change is so rapid, the talent so immature, and the organizational goals so much more focused on development than statistical results. This article doesn't spend much space addressing changes at the rookie or short-season levels. But all the changes are worth noting, both to help track player movement and to better analyze drastic changes in player performance.

    Read the full article...

    No Previous Tag Entries Next Tag Entries >>