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Articles Tagged California League 

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January 4, 2012 12:17 am

Future Shock: Rockies Top 11 Prospects

19

Kevin Goldstein

The Rockies' farm system could soon help the team to get back into contention in the NL West.

Previous Rankings: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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December 13, 2011 3:00 am

Future Shock: San Diego Padres Top 11 Prospects

47

Kevin Goldstein

The Padres are the rare team with a very deep farm but no star-level talent.

Previous Rankings: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

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Its players are a long way away from the majors, but that hasn't stopped an upstart league on the fringes of organized baseball from recruiting a new generation of boys of summer.

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Ken Arneson operated the now-defunct Baseball Toaster blog network. Ken wrote for two Toaster blogs, Catfish Stew and the Humbug Journal. Since retiring from blogging two years ago, Ken now spews most of his baseball opinions on Twitter.

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March 29, 2011 9:00 am

Divide and Conquer, NL West: New Beginnings on the Frontier

0

Geoff Young

As a new season dawns, Geoff looks at how baseball went west in the first place.

As Yogi Berra might say, we'll have all year to discuss the season. This week takes us in a different direction. Come, step into my TARDIS, as we examine the origins of professional baseball in each of the NL West cities.

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January 4, 2011 9:00 am

Prospectus Q&A: Bob Kipper

2

David Laurila

Red Sox minor-league pitching coach Bob Kipper recalls his major-league playing experiences.

Before he became a highly-regarded minor-league pitching coach, Bob Kipper lived the dream that he now helps others pursue. The 46-year-old erstwhile left-hander spent eight seasons in the big leagues, and while his record was humble—27-37 with a 4.34 ERA and 11 saves—he considers himself privileged to have simply earned the opportunity. Taken eighth overall in the 1982 draft by the California Angels, Kipper was traded to Pittsburgh three years later and logged the bulk of his 247 career appearances with the Pirates. He has been a pitching coach in the Red Sox organization since 1999, and he spent the 2010 season mentoring hurlers in Double-A Portland.

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What went right (and wrong) on last year's Top 11 lists.

Arizona Diamondbacks
No. 1 Prospect: Jarrod Parker, RHP (52nd overall)
What Was Said: “...If he comes back 100 percent, he's an All-Star.”
Analysis: As expected, Parker missed the entire year rehabbing from Tommy John surgery, but by all accounts, his recovery has been a success, as he's pitching to live hitters in the instructional league and already touching the mid-90s with his fastball. A lost year is never good for one's development, but for Parker, everything post-surgery has gone as well, if not better, than expected.
Two Through Eleven: First baseman Brandon Allen (second) had an interesting season at Triple-A Reno, slugging 25 home runs and drawing 83 walks in just 107 games, but a .261 batting average in a hitter's paradise still leaves a lot of questions. Top 2009 pick Bobby Borchering (third) really didn't get going at Low-A South Bend until the end of the season, but at least he saved his prospect status. Shortstop Chris Owings (fourth) was the best player on the South Bend squad before foot issues cut his season short. Outfielder A.J. Pollock (fifth) missed the entire year following elbow surgery, while fellow flychaser Keon Broxton (sixth) had some of the best tools in the Midwest League and led the minors with 19 triples, but also hit just .228 with 172 strikeouts. A pair of slugging 2009 draftees, outfielder Marc Krauss (seventh) and third baseman, at least in name, Matt Davidson (eighth) both impressed with the bat in their first full seasons, but lefty Mike Belfiore disappointed (ninth) in his. Converted outfielder Leyson Septimo (11th) still has insane velocity for a southpaw, and still has no idea where it's going.
Sleeper: Thick righty Josh Collmenter continued to succeed at High- and Double-A but the lack of a true out pitch caught up to him in the Pacific Coast League.






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July 21, 2010 8:00 am

California League Tour, Part 1

9

Charles Dahan

Taking a trip through the California League, looking at the stadiums, surrounding areas, teams, and hot dog ratings.

California has been home to professional baseball for over 150 years. The move of the Giants and Dodgers from New York actually dramatically diminished the vibrant baseball scene in the state, as it lessened the importance of the Pacific Coast League and the farm system that fed PCL teams. In 1941, the California League was established. The league is in the High-A classification and has 10 teams-the Modesto Nuts, Stockton Ports, and San Jose Giants in Northern California, the Visalia Rawhide and Bakersfield Blaze in the Central Valley, and the Lancaster Jethawks, High Desert (Adelanto) Mavericks, Inland Empire (San Bernardino) 66ers, Rancho Cucamonga Quakes, and Lake Elsinore Storm in the Los Angeles area. 

The league's stadiums range from post-World War II projects such as San Jose Municipal Stadium to state-of-the-art facilities with major-league worthy sky boxes, roving waiters, and enclosed restaurants and bars. Moreover, although statistics are normalized to counteract the effects of different stadiums, the features of different minor-league parks are largely unknown and not quantified. In this edition, three parks--Stockton, Lake Elsinore, and High Desert-are profiled, along with the towns and front office executives that make these clubs unique. Five parks and franchises-San Jose, Inland Empire, Modesto, Rancho Cucamonga, and Visalia-will be featured next week.

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October 23, 2007 12:00 am

Wait 'Til Next Year: Defensive Snubstitutions

0

Bryan Smith

The ten worst defenses in the minors, and the pitchers that learned to hate going to the office because of them.

While going about the business of minor league player evaluation, I think we can sometimes forget that baseball is a team game. Often in the minor leagues, it seems a game between eight players that will never make it, and the one blue-chip player you came out to the ballpark to see. Scouts are able to watch a game with blinders that allow them to focus on one player's individual skills, independent of the other players around him. This is what separates amateur-talent scouts from the average baseball fan, but in statistics, we try to do this by accounting for context. What league was the player in, relative to his age? Was he consistently dominating? What type of environment was the player hitting or pitching in?

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May 24, 2007 12:00 am

Future Shock: State of the Systems, NL West

0

Kevin Goldstein

Justin Upton and Clayton Kershaw stand out from the many fringe prospects in NL West systems.

Arizona Diamondbacks

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May 16, 2007 12:00 am

Future Shock: State of the Systems, AL West

0

Kevin Goldstein

Prospects struggle across the AL West, but there are promising big leaguers out there if you squint hard enough.

Los Angeles Angels

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October 16, 2006 12:00 am

Future Shock: Monday Morning Ten-Pack

0

Kevin Goldstein

Kevin checks out the newsmakers in the winter leagues.

\nMathematically, leverage is based on the win expectancy work done by Keith Woolner in BP 2005, and is defined as the change in the probability of winning the game from scoring (or allowing) one additional run in the current game situation divided by the change in probability from scoring\n(or allowing) one run at the start of the game.'; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_18 = 'Adjusted Pitcher Wins. Thorn and Palmers method for calculating a starters value in wins. Included for comparison with SNVA. APW values here calculated using runs instead of earned runs.'; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_19 = 'Support Neutral Lineup-adjusted Value Added (SNVA adjusted for the MLVr of batters faced) per game pitched.'; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_20 = 'The number of double play opportunities (defined as less than two outs with runner(s) on first, first and second, or first second and third).'; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_21 = 'The percentage of double play opportunities turned into actual double plays by a pitcher or hitter.'; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_22 = 'Winning percentage. For teams, Win% is determined by dividing wins by games played. For pitchers, Win% is determined by dividing wins by total decisions. '; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_23 = 'Expected winning percentage for the pitcher, based on how often\na pitcher with the same innings pitched and runs allowed in each individual\ngame earned a win or loss historically in the modern era (1972-present).'; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_24 = 'Attrition Rate is the percent chance that a hitters plate appearances or a pitchers opposing batters faced will decrease by at least 50% relative to his Baseline playing time forecast. Although it is generally a good indicator of the risk of injury, Attrition Rate will also capture seasons in which his playing time decreases due to poor performance or managerial decisions. '; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_25 = 'Batting average (hitters) or batting average allowed (pitchers).'; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_26 = 'Average number of pitches per start.'; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_27 = 'Average Pitcher Abuse Points per game started.'; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_28 = 'Singles or singles allowed.'; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_29 = 'Batting average; hits divided by at-bats.'; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_30 = 'Percentage of pitches thrown for balls.'; xxxpxxxxx1160988517_31 = 'The Baseline forecast, although it does not appear here, is a crucial intermediate step in creating a players forecast. The Baseline developed based on the players previous three seasons of performance. Both major league and (translated) minor league performances are considered.

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October 14, 2006 12:00 am

Future Shock: Where Did the Tigers and the Athletics Come From?

0

Kevin Goldstein

Even Alexis Gomez came from somewhere (Kansas City). Kevin tells us how the Tigers and A's acquired the rest of their postseason difference-makers.

\nMathematically, leverage is based on the win expectancy work done by Keith Woolner in BP 2005, and is defined as the change in the probability of winning the game from scoring (or allowing) one additional run in the current game situation divided by the change in probability from scoring\n(or allowing) one run at the start of the game.'; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_18 = 'Adjusted Pitcher Wins. Thorn and Palmers method for calculating a starters value in wins. Included for comparison with SNVA. APW values here calculated using runs instead of earned runs.'; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_19 = 'Support Neutral Lineup-adjusted Value Added (SNVA adjusted for the MLVr of batters faced) per game pitched.'; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_20 = 'The number of double play opportunities (defined as less than two outs with runner(s) on first, first and second, or first second and third).'; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_21 = 'The percentage of double play opportunities turned into actual double plays by a pitcher or hitter.'; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_22 = 'Winning percentage. For teams, Win% is determined by dividing wins by games played. For pitchers, Win% is determined by dividing wins by total decisions. '; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_23 = 'Expected winning percentage for the pitcher, based on how often\na pitcher with the same innings pitched and runs allowed in each individual\ngame earned a win or loss historically in the modern era (1972-present).'; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_24 = 'Attrition Rate is the percent chance that a hitters plate appearances or a pitchers opposing batters faced will decrease by at least 50% relative to his Baseline playing time forecast. Although it is generally a good indicator of the risk of injury, Attrition Rate will also capture seasons in which his playing time decreases due to poor performance or managerial decisions. '; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_25 = 'Batting average (hitters) or batting average allowed (pitchers).'; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_26 = 'Average number of pitches per start.'; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_27 = 'Average Pitcher Abuse Points per game started.'; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_28 = 'Singles or singles allowed.'; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_29 = 'Batting average; hits divided by at-bats.'; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_30 = 'Percentage of pitches thrown for balls.'; xxxpxxxxx1160846402_31 = 'The Baseline forecast, although it does not appear here, is a crucial intermediate step in creating a players forecast. The Baseline developed based on the players previous three seasons of performance. Both major league and (translated) minor league performances are considered.

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