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Articles Tagged CBA 

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07-17

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BP Daily Podcast: Effectively Wild Episode 494: Evan Drellich on the Astros' Aiken Pains
by
Ben Lindbergh and Zachary Levine

07-09

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Skewed Left: What the CBA Says About the All-Star Game
by
Zachary Levine

05-08

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Skewed Left: The Five Teams That Don't Have to Play by (All of) the Rules
by
Zachary Levine

03-27

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9

Baseball Therapy: The Lessons of Lohse
by
Russell A. Carleton

11-02

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The BP Wayback Machine: Changing the Game?
by
Joe Sheehan

08-01

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4

Sobsequy: What We Learned About the Deadline
by
Adam Sobsey

07-20

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12

BP Unfiltered: Alex Anthopoulos Always Checks His Math
by
Ben Lindbergh

06-04

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2

Bizball: Inside the 2012-16 MLB CBA: Minimum Salaries, the Luxury Tax
by
Maury Brown

05-29

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21

Bizball: Inside the 2012-16 CBA: The Luxury Tax Meets the Draft
by
Maury Brown

02-03

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The BP Wayback Machine: Cuban Imports
by
John Perrotto

01-18

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The BP Wayback Machine: The Arbitration Process
by
Thomas Gorman

03-12

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14

Transaction Analysis: Import/Export
by
Christina Kahrl

08-13

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3

Defection Alert
by
Clay Davenport

11-29

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Schrodinger's Bat: Always Increasing
by
Dan Fox

02-15

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International Prospectus
by
John Perrotto

11-06

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The Ledger Domain: A Look at the New Collective Bargaining Agreement: Luxury Tax, and Minimum Payroll
by
Maury Brown

01-31

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The Arbitration Process
by
Thomas Gorman

06-11

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The New CBA, Part II
by
Doug Pappas

06-03

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The New CBA, Part I
by
Doug Pappas

05-09

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The New CBA
by
Doug Pappas

03-04

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Surveying the Authors
by
Doug Pappas

09-04

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The Daily Prospectus: Back From a Long Weekend
by
Gary Huckabay

09-03

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Prospectus Roundtable: Strike's End
by
Baseball Prospectus

07-29

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The Daily Prospectus: A Late Pick-Me-Up
by
Joe Sheehan

07-18

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The Daily Prospectus: Leverage
by
Joe Sheehan

07-18

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The Daily Prospectus: Leverage
by
Joe Sheehan

06-21

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Prospectus Feature: Baseball's Brave New World
by
Gary Gillette

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August 13, 2009 1:18 pm

Defection Alert

3

Clay Davenport

Translating the performance of the latest Cuban to skip out on Castroland to answer whether he ranks with this winter's top free agents.

There's been another defection from the land of Castro. Aroldis Chapman is a 21-year-old Cuban emigré-and we're more certain about that than we are for most Cuban players-who walked out of a Dutch hotel in July while playing in a tournament. Given the likelihood of a bidding war as frenzied as the one involving Jose Contreras, he's someone you should have on your radar as a pitcher who may well attract as much interest as the top free agents available to your friendly neighborhood ballclub.

He's a bit of a stringbean at 6-foot-3 and 185 pounds, and he throws left-handed, which is always attractive, but what puts him truly over the top is that he throws 100 mph. Here are his actual stats in Cuba for the last four years:

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November 29, 2007 12:00 am

Schrodinger's Bat: Always Increasing

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Dan Fox

It's the season of giving, and Dan's got something every stathead wants in his or her stocking--BIPChart 2.5

"Software is like entropy. It is difficult to grasp, weighs nothing, and obeys the second law of thermodynamics; i.e. it always increases."
-Norman R. Augustine


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February 15, 2007 12:00 am

International Prospectus

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John Perrotto

With a number of organizations deeply invested in Japan, the Pirates look for Cuban arms to help pull them out of the cellar.

If you don't believe it, just think back to a few months ago when the chat rooms, talk shows, and highlight shows were filled with news of the posting for Daisuke Matsuzaka by Seibu Lions, the spirited bidding war that ensued, the Boston Red Sox winning that bidding at a whopping $51,111,111.11 and the subsequent negotiations than ended with Dice-K signing a six-year contract worth $52 million.

Throw in the $26,000,194 the New York Yankees paid through the posting system to the Hanshin Tigers in order to sign left-hander Kei Igawa to a five-year, $20-million contract, and Japan has clearly replaced Cuba as the nation major league clubs look to for quick fixes.

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How is the luxury tax changing in the new CBA, and what will clubs be able to do with money received? Maury's latest article on what the CBA means for baseball.

Today, I'll look at two more pieces of the CBA puzzle that are designed in place to bolster better competitive balance. As I previously noted, this look at the CBA comes without a ratified CBA in hand. You can guarantee that BP will be going over the finalized agreement with a fine-tooth comb, once it is made public.

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January 31, 2005 12:00 am

The Arbitration Process

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Thomas Gorman

Over the next three weeks, hearings will be held to determine salaries for dozens of ballplayers. These hearings are the culmination of a process that begins in December, but has its roots in the early 1970s.

Salary arbitration had humble beginnings. The owners were exhausted by holdouts who refused to show up for spring training. The players were sick of having that refusal to play as their sole leverage in contract negotiations. With Flood v. Baseball failing to force a change in the reserve clause, arbitration seemed a reasonable solution.

Ed Fitzgerald, the Milwaukee Brewers Chairman and head of the owners' Player Relations Committee (PRC) in the early 1970s, embraced the idea as a way to neutralize the MLBPA's push for free agency. The Association's arguments against the owners would be weakened if the Lords showed a willingness to submit to binding and independent salary arbitration. Other owners, in particular the A's Charlie Finley and the Cardinals' Dick Meyer (who had experience with binding arbitration when he was labor chief of Anheuser-Busch), were suspicious, claiming that arbitration would drive salaries up. Which it would, compared to the status quo.

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June 11, 2003 12:00 am

The New CBA, Part II

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Doug Pappas

Continuing his series on the new Collective Bargaining Agreement, Doug Pappas looks at the ins and outs of MLB scheduling.

Article V: Scheduling

While many provisions of the CBA have no analogue in non-sports labor negotiations, Article V, which deals with the major league schedule, is a set of work rules the UAW or Teamsters can relate to. Schedule-related provisions have been in each CBA since the first.

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June 3, 2003 12:00 am

The New CBA, Part I

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Doug Pappas

Doug Pappas starts his series on the new Collective Bargaining Agreement today with a look at Articles I-IV. Over the next few weeks he'll explore some of the key clauses in the CBA as well as some of the most important changes made in this latest edition.

The new collective bargaining agreement between the 30 clubs comprising Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association is the ninth in a series which began in 1968. Although the MLBPA was officially organized in 1956, it didn't function as a union for another decade, until Marvin Miller was hired to serve as its full-time executive director in 1966. Judge Robert Cannon, the players' advisor before Miller, got along so well with the owners that he was a serious candidate for Commissioner when Ford Frick retired. Under Cannon, the MLBPA was even funded by the owners, using money from the players' pension fund, in flagrant violation of federal labor law.

One of Miller's first tasks was to formalize the relationships between the owners and the MLBPA, and the terms and conditions of players' employment by the clubs, in a collective bargaining agreement. The first Basic Agreement, as MLB's CBAs have always been officially called, with its provisions retroactive to January 1. As a sign of where the parties stood before the first CBA, one of its provisions eliminated the $30 deposit on their uniforms the players had previously had to pay. Since then, all subsequent CBAs have built on the outline of this original document, rewriting articles to reflect new terms and adding new matters to the end of the document.

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May 9, 2003 12:00 am

The New CBA

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Doug Pappas

Although the owners and players shook hands on a new collective bargaining agreement last August 30, the final version of the CBA was not published until this week. The eight-month delay becomes easier to understand when one looks at the document. The table of contents alone runs 11 pages; counting the attachments, the CBA itself is 223 pages long. Over the next few months I'll be writing a series of articles about the new CBA. These articles will walk through the document from beginning to end, translating the key points from legalese to English and discussing them in the context of past agreements.

Over the next few months I'll be writing a series of articles about the new CBA. These articles will walk through the document from beginning to end, translating the key points from legalese to English and discussing them in the context of past agreements.

Not quite yet, though. I'll be on vacation next week, with two transcontinental flights, two Pizza Feeds, three national parks, my first visit to Pac Bell Park, quality time with several friends from college, and at least 2,000 miles of driving to occupy me as I generate content for the other side of my Web site. For now I'll summarize three things I learned from a first pass through the CBA.

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March 4, 2003 12:00 am

Surveying the Authors

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Doug Pappas

For the past seven years, I've surveyed the members of the Society For American Baseball Research's Business of Baseball Committee about issues relating to baseball labor and economics, publishing the results and a cross-section of the comments in the winter issue of the Committee's quarterly newsletter. With a new CBA in place and the Expos still in limbo, I decided to survey my fellow Prospectus writers, too. Unlike the usual Prospectus roundtable, no one saw or commented on anyone else's answers. BP writers who responded to the survey included Jeffrey Bower, Will Carroll, Gary Huckabay, Rany Jazayerli, Jonah Keri, Doug Pappas, Joe Sheehan, Nate Silver and Derek Zumsteg. As you'll see, our views are far from monolithic.

BP writers who responded to the survey included Jeffrey Bower, Will Carroll, Gary Huckabay, Rany Jazayerli, Jonah Keri, Doug Pappas, Joe Sheehan, Nate Silver and Derek Zumsteg. As you'll see, our views are far from monolithic.

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Hi, everyone. I hope you all had a good Labor Day weekend. Of course, I'm an A's fan, so every weekend's been good to me lately. And yet, even with the continuation of The Streak, I'm beginning to get the same feeling in the pit of my stomach that I did when Jeter made the flip to nail Giambi last year. Yeah, 19 in a row is tremendous, but if Oakland can do it, so can Anaheim or Seattle--and there's still plenty of time. Sure, it's better to be in first, but I'd feel considerably better if they could shred out another four or five wins immediately after this run ends.

Hi, everyone. I hope you all had a good Labor Day weekend.

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[Just after midnight Eastern time Friday morning, the Prospectus staff starts discussing the coming agreement] Derek Zumsteg: It appears that if the owners gave in right now, just said "sure, we'll take your last offer", they'd have won more in this negotiation than in any previous one since free agency. Why did the players move so far? Are they that afraid of the NLRB and implementation? Do they believe that if they give in this time, they'll be able to win it back in four years when it's apparent none of this did any good for competitive balance? I'm baffled.

[Just after midnight Eastern time Friday morning, the Prospectus staff starts discussing the coming agreement]

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It's 11:49 p.m. EDT, and I'm sitting here staring slack-jawed at a 13-inch television set. In St. Louis, the remnants of what was a crowd of 47,000 people are going nuts, and the Cardinals are jumping around as if they've won the World Series. Edgar Renteria has just hit a three-run home run to cap a six-run ninth inning, giving the Cards a 10-9 victory.

Wow.

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