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06-20

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16

In A Pickle: The Sexy, Sultry San Jose vs. MLB Complaint
by
Jason Wojciechowski

12-06

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4

BP Unfiltered: Texas Rangers Need IT Customer Service Specialist
by
Joe Hamrahi

11-18

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1

BP Announcements: Kansas City Royals Job Posting - Systems Architect
by
Joe Hamrahi

08-27

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29

Bizball: The Priciest Trade Ever Made
by
Maury Brown

09-06

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3

Divide and Conquer, NL West: Beating the Weak and Powerless
by
Geoff Young

05-27

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5

Baseball ProGUESTus: Curing the Frank McCourt Blues
by
Eric Nusbaum

07-30

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12

Ahead in the Count: The Poor Return on Dan Haren
by
Matt Swartz

07-13

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14

Prospectus Q&A: Jeff Ma
by
Will Carroll

05-20

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18

Squawking Baseball: The Enigma That is MLB Network
by
Shawn Hoffman

03-16

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55

An Agent's Take: You Never Know
by
Joshua Kusnick

03-05

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10

Remodeling the Media
by
Shawn Hoffman

02-26

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25

Solving the Digital Blackout Blues
by
Shawn Hoffman

02-19

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7

Riding High
by
Shawn Hoffman

02-05

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13

Opening Up MLB.com
by
Shawn Hoffman

01-29

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2

Way Above It All
by
Shawn Hoffman

01-20

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Randy Newsom
by
David Laurila

09-05

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0

The Big Picture: Raiding or Raising the East?
by
David Pinto

05-21

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0

Remembering Doug Pappas
by
Maury Brown

02-19

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0

The Ledger Domain: MLB Needs to Reconnect
by
Maury Brown

02-12

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0

The Ledger Domain: A Deeper Look at the Exclusive Extra Innings to DirecTV Deal
by
Maury Brown

01-29

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0

The Ledger Domain: Q&A with Branch Rickey III
by
Maury Brown

01-22

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0

The Ledger Domain: Risky Business
by
Maury Brown

09-24

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0

The Ledger Domain: Perpetual Motion
by
Maury Brown

06-05

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0

The Ledger Domain: Walter O'Malley and Marvin Miller For the Hall of Fame
by
Maury Brown

07-13

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0

Lies, Damned Lies: Book Review, Scout's Honor
by
Nate Silver

09-28

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0

D.C. At The Bat
by
Neil deMause

05-09

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0

Prospectus Q&A: Roger Angell, Part I
by
Alex Belth

03-20

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0

Deep Fried Twinkies
by
Craig Elsten

02-28

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0

Prospectus Feature: The Downfall of Denny McLain
by
Mark Armour

02-28

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0

The Downfall of Denny McLain
by
Baseball Prospectus

04-18

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0

Sensible Revenue Sharing
by
Keith Woolner

08-17

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The Imbalance Sheet: Revenue Sharing
by
Keith Law

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Jason dives into San Jose's case against MLB in the city's ongoing pursuit of the Oakland Athletics.

You've heard about it at this point: The City of San Jose sued Major League Baseball for not letting the A's move to their fair municipality. You can find the complaint, which was filed in federal court in San Jose, here (pdf). It's long, though I've seen longer. The PDF is 188 pages, but that's with exhibits. The text of the complaint itself is 46 pages. It's 203 paragraphs.1

One reason it's so long is that the first six pages (23 paragraphs) are essentially a narrative background of the case. The point of a complaint in the federal courts (warning: I'm about to vastly oversimplify a contentious area of law) is to notify the other party of the claims against it. That's what it boils down to. That does not mean that a complaint saying, "I'm suing you for breach of contract" would be sufficient. Which contract? How was it breached? When was it breached? In order to inform the other party of the claims, then, the complaint has to actually allege facts.

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IT Customer Service Specialist Position Available with the Texas Rangers

Our friends in Arlington asked if we could share this job opening with our readers. Please follow the link at the bottom to apply if you're interested. Tell them Baseball Prospectus sent you. Good luck!

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Kansas City Royals looking for Systems Architect, Baseball Analytics

The Kansas City Royals are looking to hire a Systems Architect for their Baseball Analytics department. You can apply for the position by going to Team Work online. A copy of the job description is below. Let the Royals know you read about the opening at Baseball Prospectus.

JOB SUMMARY:
The Kansas City Royals Baseball Club is seeking a highly motivated data architect and systems developer to deliver analytics solutions to both baseball and business operations. While primarily working with baseball operations, this individual will also support projects for broader business operations. The ideal applicant will be able to manage multiple concurrent projects that expand the overall Royals’ information architecture and analytics capabilities.


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August 27, 2012 5:00 am

Bizball: The Priciest Trade Ever Made

29

Maury Brown

A look at the Boston/LA deal that set a record for the most money ever involved in a Major League Baseball trade.

On Saturday, the baseball world saw what it often likes to see in a true blockbuster trade. There may be regrets when all is said and done, but for now, the sides each got what they were looking for. The Red Sox, who had the league’s third-highest Opening Day payroll ($175,249,119), got little aside from salary relief in the deal ; the owners of the Dodgers, who on May 1 closed a $2.15 billion sale, were looking to not only make the playoffs but run clean through to a World Series championship.

As we covered on Saturday here at BP, the nine player deal had the Red Sox trading right-hander Josh Beckett, left fielder Carl Crawford, first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, infielder Nick Punto, and reportedly $12 million cash considerations to the Los Angeles Dodgers for first baseman James Loney, infielder Ivan DeJesus, Jr., right hander Allen Webster, and two players to be named later. Those two players are rumored to be Rubby de la Rosa and Jerry Sands.

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September 6, 2011 5:00 am

Divide and Conquer, NL West: Beating the Weak and Powerless

3

Geoff Young

While the Giants flounder further from contention, the Diamondbacks continue to rise, largely thanks to their record against losing teams.

Through September 4, Arizona leads the division by seven games with 22 remaining. Although the Diamondbacks have earned their success by playing better than everyone else in the division for an extended period of time—Jay Jaffe has extolled the team's considerable virtues—they also have taken advantage of weaker opponents in a way that the Giants have not.

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Has the time come to end the scourge of evil owners with a simple contract?

Believe it or not, most of our writers didn't enter the world sporting an @baseballprospectus.com address; with a few exceptions, they started out somewhere else. In an effort to up your reading pleasure while tipping our caps to some of the most illuminating work being done elsewhere on the internet, we'll be yielding the stage once a week to the best and brightest baseball writers, researchers and thinkers from outside of the BP umbrella. If you'd like to nominate a guest contributor (including yourself), please drop us a line.

Eric Nusbaum is a writer born in Los Angeles and living in Seattle. He founded and co-edits Pitchers & Poets, a blog devoted to conversation about baseball and its place in our world. A story he wrote for that blog appeared in the 2010 edition of Best American Sportswriting.

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July 30, 2010 8:00 am

Ahead in the Count: The Poor Return on Dan Haren

12

Matt Swartz

The quartet the Snakes received for their ace leads to a few questions about player valuation.

In June, Eric Seidman and I discussed the Diamondbacks’ starting pitchers with some focus on Dan Haren, explaining that he was particularly unlucky. At the time of our article, Haren’s ERA was 5.35 and his SIERA was 3.08. Haren would be the ace of many pitching staffs in the major leagues, and is signed well below market value through 2012, with a reasonably priced option for 2013.

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One of the subjects of the movie 21 discusses his upcoming book, The House Advantage, and incorporating statistics into life.

Jeff Ma is one of the few people who had a movie made about part of his life, and yet remains much more interesting than the character that Hollywood invented. He was one of the "MIT Blackjack Team" portrayed in the movie 21 and in Ben Mezrich's book Bringing Down The House. He started ProTrade and Citizen Sports, which was sold to Yahoo last year. Now, he's brought all of his background and love for sports into a new book, The House Advantage.

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May 20, 2010 11:31 am

Squawking Baseball: The Enigma That is MLB Network

18

Shawn Hoffman

MLB Network is winning awards, but hasn't been as profitable as expected for Major League Baseball.

MLB Network has quickly become a very enigmatic business. It had the biggest launch in cable history last January­—when it instantly entered almost 50 million homes—and reportedly exceeded expectations on the advertising side in its first year. It’s also been a hit critically, as it won a bunch of Emmys last month, and—in my opinion—has been a hell of a lot better than "Baseball Tonight" since day one.

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Agents can sometimes find clients when they expect it.

Josh Kusnick is a Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based agent who will periodically write about his experiences representing professional baseball players and media personalities.

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March 5, 2009 11:43 am

Remodeling the Media

10

Shawn Hoffman

Newspapers are struggling to survive, but the demand for news content remains constant.

It's been a rough couple of weeks for newspapers. The Rocky Mountain News is gone, shut down by parent company E.W. Scripps. The San Francisco Chronicle and Seattle Post-Intelligencer may not be far behind, as Hearst has threatened to close both papers if it's unable to find a buyer or receive major concessions from its unions. And even the Wall Street Journal is taking it on the chin; News Corp had to take a $2.8 billion write-down on the paper (half of what they purchased it for just over a year ago), even though it has kept its circulation relatively flat.

This obviously isn't a new phenomenon. Newspapers have been on death row ever since the internet destroyed the barriers to entry in this space (it takes about four minutes and zero dollars to set up an online publication), but the recession has accelerated the process beyond anyone's reasonable estimates. If the advertising climate in the US doesn't improve by the end of this year, the Rocky will only be the first in a long line of papers going the way of the dodo.

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February 26, 2009 12:28 pm

Solving the Digital Blackout Blues

25

Shawn Hoffman

For a price, of course, but one man's proposal for how to address an increasingly archaic situation.

"This is all a very, very complicated matter. Who really has these [digital] rights, and how do we best bring them to the marketplace? That's the big question. And though we're in sort of a holding pattern right now, it's no doubt the single biggest economic issue our industry is facing."
-MLB Club Official (Sports Business Journal)

That anonymous club official was interviewed before the financial world collapsed in September, so you can forgive him for seeming to have a weird set of priorities. But if you've been reading this space, you know how valuable the digital rights to local MLB game broadcasts could be in the long term. As complicated as the issue may be, you would think that when everybody is losing-and I mean everybody-there would be some serious incentive to figure it out, but so far, no luck. If you live in Montana, you still can't see Mariners games on MLB.tv (or MLB Extra Innings, for that matter). Or, perhaps even worse, if you live in New York, you can only watch the Yankees or Mets if you're also willing to buy FitTv, about seventeen Discovery channels, and a couple hundred other cable stations that you'll never watch.


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